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newton Graphic. 


VOL. XLVII.— NO. 38 


NEWTON MASS., PRIDAY, JUNE 6. 1919. 


TERMS, $3.50 A YEAR 


s 


INTERE STING M EETING 

Aldermen Discuss Oak Hill Streets and Favor 
Concrete Curbing on Cook St. 


Many interesting matters were dis- 
cussed at the meeting 6f the aldermen 
on Monday evening, at. which every 
member was present. 

Hearings were held on an Edison 
’ pole l location on Pleasant street and 
on petition of Hon. G. F’red Simpson 
to keep gasolene at 315 Franklin 
street and both were granted. Other 
hearings were held on petition of J. 
Kligman to sell gasolene at 456 Wa- 
tertown street, on laying a sewer in 
Priscilla road and a sidewalk on Ham- 
mond street at which no one appeared, 
the two laBt being subsequently grant- 
ed. Messrs. Ryan and: Quinn spoke in 
favor of a Bewer in Parkview avenue 
and there was no opposition. 

J. Augustus Remington of Otis park 
and Hedley P. Patey of Grove Hill 
were drawn as Jurors for the June 
court at Cambridge. 

Mayor Childs sent in recommenda- 
tionsfor $1550 for a Memorial tablet 
at the State Armory for $300 for clean- 
ing the grounds at the High School 
after the training detachment, for 
$1000 additional for Welcome Home 
Celebration, for $5800 for construction 
of Westbourne road, all of which were 
granted. He also recommended ’$2000 
for extension of Langley road to Boyl- 
ston street a two room portable school 
building at the Stearns school, for 
$768.02. Laborers pensions for Philip 
Turner and R. J. Adams, relative to 
change in Building Code in regard to 
erection of temporary buildings, for 
$3175 additional for construction of 
Service station at Crafts street yard, 
for $460.74 to settle certain claims, 
and submitting claim of Francis M. 
Cain for back wages as a police offi- 
cer. 

Licenses as a common victualler 
were granted Nicola Delofff, 193 Adams 
street and Mrs. Martha J. Sperl, 628 
Commonwealth avenue, to William H. 
Rand as an auctioneer, and to Miss 
Alice Shovelton. Summit street and C. 
C. Colby, Kenrick street, for private 
garages. 

Other petitions were received for 
sewer in Kenrick street, of Walter V. 
Hess for truck license, George W. Gor- 
don, 26 Centre place, Newton Real Es- 
tate Association, rear 277 Walnut 
street, W. W. Trowbridge, 17 Chestnut 
street, E. B. Wilcox, Hermon terrace, 
for multiple garages, from Lewis H. 
Bacon, Chestnut street, and Alex. 
Smith. Bowen street for private gar- 
ages, for sewer in Priscilla road, sew- 
er in Prince street, from S. A. Lang- 
ley for Soldiers’ relief, J. P. R. Sher- 
_ maiv to eliminate crows, J. F. Daly 
for auto license, J. J. Cady for auto 
license, and C. J. Browm to prohibit 
heavy trucking on Washington street 
hill. 

Petition of Rev. J. E. Park to allow 
children to take part in a Mother 
Goose entertainment on June 5 and 
betterment assessments of Elizabeth 
B. Nye Carver road, and Hurley heirs, 
South Meadow brook were granted. 

On recommendation of committees, 
$72 was authorized to settle claim of 
Henry E. Wry. an ordinance relative 
to use of private garages was adopt- 
ed, a hearing assigned on discontinu- 
ance of Sawaco road, Westbourne road 


laid out under betterment act, sewers 
ordered in Kenrick street and Priscilla 
road, $2500 added to New Curbing ac- 
count, and $460 contributed to M. & 
B. St. Rwy. Co. 

There was a long debate over the 
report of the Public Works commit- 
tee recommending that Dedham street 
and Walnut street, from West Rox- 
bury line to Boylston street be wid- 
ened to 80 feet with a 20 foot roadbed 
on centre location that Walnut street 
between Boylston street and Floral 
street be widened to 75 feet and that 
a building line be etsablished on Wal- 
nut St. between Floral St. and the rail- 
road bridge at Newton Highlands. The 
debate covered the condition of Ded- 
ham St., Dudley Rd., Parker St., and 
Winchester street, the attitude of the 
Mayor towards these improvements 
and the amount of money they would 
cost. 

Alderman Forknall strongLy favored 
the .boulevard construction of Ded- 
ham street at an estimated cost of 
$175000, while the Mayor has only for- 
mally recommended $145000 for Dud- 
ley road, Parker and Winchester 
streets. Mr. Forknall believed the 
Mayor would recommend Dedham 
street work provided the releases 
were signed by the abuttors. Aider- 
man Angier said that so far as he 
was concerned he favored an appro- 
priation of $250000 for street work 
this year, without specific reference 
to particular streets. Aldermen Cole, 
Clement, Blake, Hollis, McCarthy. Car- 
ter, Whidden and Nichols all took part 
in the discussion and the matter was 
tlien referred to the Finance commit- 
tee. _ 

'Alderman Hollis criticized the report 
of the Finance committee that it was 
inexpedient to create an additional 
sergeant of police but he was alonie in 
his opposition. The committee also 
reported that it was inexpedient to 
rearrange the salaries in the Engi- 
neering Dept. Soldiers’ Relief of $10 
a week was allowed Christine A. Sul- 
livan. 

Alderman Whidden said that his 
committee tentatively favored a site 
for an incinerator near the cement 
shed on LewiB terrace and a public 
hearing was ojrdered on the matter at 
the next meeting. 

Alderman Whidden was highly 
praised by Alderman Angier for his 
w’ork in connection with proposed 
service station at the Crafts street 
yard and after he had explained the 
details, an order for $56,671.88 (or this 
work, of which $55,000 was by bond 
issue, was approved. 

Alderman Forknall expressed some 
criticism of the action of the Finance 
committee in raising the report of his 
committee from $22,000 to $27,000 for 
work on South Meadow brook, but the 
order was passed unanimously. 

The action of the Finance committee 
in reducing the Public Works report 
for $2965 for curbing on Cook street to 
$1965 was sharply criticized bv Al- 
derman Forknall who said that the 
difference in amount meant that con- 
crete would be used for curb instead 
(Continued on Page 2) 


V 


Newton Trust Company 

The Largest commercial bank in the suburbs of 
Boston, with an ample capital and surplus, and 

Assets of Over Six Million 

invites the banking business of the people of Newton. 
Small accounts are welcomed and given every atten- 
tion. Business accounts are treated in a broad, liberal 


The exceptional strength of the Board of Directors 
should appeal to all. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


Seward W. Jones 
William F. Bacon 
Howard M. Biscoe 
Albert P. Carter 
Howard P. Converse 
James W. French 
S. Harold Greene 
Frank J. Hale 
Sydney Harwood 


Fred R. Haywood 
Dr. Edward E. Hopkins 
George Hutchinson 
John F. Lothrop 
Franklin T. Miller 
Frederick S. Pratt 
James L. Richards 
George F. Schrafft 
G. Fred Simpson 


WELCOME HOME CELEBRATION 

Newton is Gaily Decorated and Ready to Pay Its Tribute ol Respect to Over 
1100 ol Its Returned Soldiers and Sailors. Full Program ol the Day. 


Elaborate plans are being rapidly 
perfected to make the All Newton 
Welcome Home Celebration* to the 
boys of this city who have been in 
the service of their country, an affair 
long to be remembered. 

Already there has been a generous 
response to the requests of the com- 
mittee In charge that the residences 
and stores along the route of the par- 
ade be decorated. The City Hall and 
public buildings in West Newton and 
the stores In Nonantum square are 
particularly attractive. 

About 1100 men have accepted the 
invitation extended by the city au- 
thorities and they have been requested 
to meet in their respective village 
squares qt noon, where automobiles 
will be ready for them. 

While the parade itself will not start 
from the Lake street end of Common- 
wealth avenue until two o’clock, it 
will be necessary with several hun- 
dred automobiles participating, to 
have plenty of time for the necessary 
formation. The parade will be headed 
by a car bearing a Memorial service 
flag for the 81 Newton* men who gave 
their lives in the war. There will be 
a few cars bearing the principal 
guests of honor, Mayor Childs and 
President Harriman and Vice Presi- 
dent Cole of the Board of Aldermen*, 
and the remainder of the procession 
will be confined exclusively to service 
men with members of the late C. Co. 
having the right of line. The parade 


KN Hi H TS TEM PL A RS 

The Gethsemane Commandery, 
Knight Templars, entertained the la- 
dies at a Mardi Gras last evening at 
Masonic Hall, Newtonville. About 200 
sat down to the banquet. The chair- 
man, Sir Knight Thomas F. Murray, 
then introduced Sir Knight Fred M. 
Blanchard, who was toastmaster for 
the evening. 

The address of welcome was given 
by Eminent Commander, John E. 
Cobb. Mrs. Cobb was then presented 
with a very beautiful bouquet of flow- 
ers. During the banquet. Miss Mor- 
gan of Brookline told humorous and 
witty stories which were enthusiasti- 
cally received. 

At 8.30 all retired to the drill hall 
where a squad of 24 under the com- 
mand of Adj. Albert E. Billings, 1st 
Lieut. W. G. S. Chamberlain, and 2nd 
Lieut. Lowell D. MacNutt gave an ex- 
hibition. Miss W. S. Richardson and 
Miss Alice Wilson from Worcester 
also gave very charming dances. An 
organ recital and a cornet solo added 
to the pleasure of those present. The 
latter part of the evening was spent 
in dancing, Hayes Orchestra furnish- 
ing the music. 

The committe in charge were chair- 
man, Sir Knight Thomas F. Murray, 
Adj. Albert E. Billings, Sir Knight 
George A. Bacon, and the entire drill 
corps. 


will pass thru every part of the city 
between two o’clock and half past 
three, when It ends at Norumbega 
Park. It has been suggested that the 
various places of business in the city 
arrange to close their doors while the 
procession is passing in their vicinity. 
At City Hall, West Newton, a large 
reviewing stand has been erected at 
which Mayor Childs and the guests 
of honor will review the parade. 
Mayor Childs has also invited the 
aldermen, veterans of the G. A. R., and 
of the Spanish War to be his guests at 
this review. At Norumbega Park, the 
exercises beginning at four o’clock 
will take place In the theatre, where 
President Harriman will preside and’ 
brief speeches will be made, followed 
by an hour of excellent vaudeville. 

Two large tents have been erected 
in the athletic field and a substantial 
banquet will be served here at six 
o’clock. 75 representative women of 
the city have offered their aid in serv- 
ing this dinner. The festivities will 
close in the evening with a grand 
ball at the State Armory in West 
Newton. A large tent has been erect- 
ed here for refreshments and both the 
hall and tent have been decorated for 
the occasion. 

There will also be a separate tent 
for checking garments with profes- 
sional checkers In charge and there 
will be continuous music by the New- 
ton Constabulary band and the Col- 
onial Singing Orchestra. 


The men taking part In the cele- 
bration will be presented with sou- 
venir badges. 

An unusual and greatly appreciated 
part of the Welcome celebration has 
been the performances given on Mon- 
day, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday 
evenings of this week in Players' Hall, 
of the original comic opera “Miss In- 
dependence” by the members of the 
Newton Amateur Opera Association. 
It will be remembered that this opera 
was given last winter by the Associa- 
tion, and the members of the cast have 
most generously given their time and 
efforts to make this part of the cele- 
bration a success. 

The arrangements at Norumbega 
Park are in charge of a committee of 
which Representative Bernard Early 
is chairman and Alderman Goodwin, 
secretary. At the ball. General James 
G. White is in charge and will have 
the assistance of Capt. Henry D. 
Cormerais, as floor director, and the 
following aides, all of whom are old 
Co. C. men, Capt. Edward Edmunds. 
First Sergt. Wesley Pease. Sergt. A. 
Leo Taffe. Sergt. John F. Faherty, 
Sergt. Edward J. Cannon. Corp. Albert 
J. Considine, and Corp. Thomas 
Hickey. 

The parade is in charge of a com- 
petent committee headed by Mr. Fred 
M. Blanchard and the automobiles are 
in charge of Capt. Henry W. Crowell 
of Company A of the State Guard. 


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320 Huntington Avenue 

Boston 


While in bathing yesterday after- 
noon at the swimming hole above the 
dam on Charles River at Bridge street. 
Nonantum, James T. Lombardi. 12 
years ot age, and living on Capitol 
street, was drowned, and another boy 
known as Jerry had a narrow escape, 
being saved by Mr. Martin Dargon of 
Union street who was passing by. Mr. 
Dargon. after rescuing Jerry, went out 
again after Lombardi, and reached 
him, but was unable to save the lad. 
being nearly overcome himself. Mr. 
Dargon states that if there had been a 
life preserver at this point, both boys 
could have been saved. 

This is one of the popular bathing 
pools on the river and is visited daily 
by hundreds of young boys and 
several drownings have taken 
place here. As it is on Metropolitan 
Par’.; land there is no reason why the 
Commission should not place a life 
preserving outfit at^his point. 

STILL WINNING 


Newton High improved its position 
in the Suburban League Wednesday, 
when it defeated Cambridge Latin, 3 to 
2, in one of the best games of the 
school season at Newtonville. 

Newton was fortunate to win, for 
Cambridge Latin made a great rally 
in the eighth, scoring two runs. 

Capt. Fred Sawyer pitched good 
ball', only four hits being made off his 
delivery. 


IDEAL MEMORIAL DAY 

Veterans of German War Participate lor the First 
Time In the Exercises of the Day 


XT. IDA SCHOOL 


Mt. Ida School concluded its work 
for the year this week, holding its 
class day exercises on Tuesday, its an- 
nual play Tuesday night and holding 
its graduating exercises on Wednes- 
day. 

On Class Day. the seniors, carrying 
baskets of yellow roses, the class flow- 
er. marched beneath an arch formed 
by fifty-four juniors wearing blue and 
pink hats and holding wands of the 
same colors. The senior president ex- 
tended a welcome, and the vice presi- 
dent delivered the class oration. Va- 
rious amusing gifts to undergraduates 
were then made by Ruth Cole of Port- 
land, and Miss Wild Rose delivered the 
class prophecy. Miss de Becker was 
the ivy orator, and after the planting 
of the ivy. and the singing of the ivy 
song, the senior president presented 
the spade to Marion Hanauer, the jun- 
ior president. The class poem was 
read by its author. Virginia Hann. 

The class play was ‘‘She Stoops to 
Conquer.” 

Mayor Edwin O. Childs made the ad- 
dress at the graduation exercises on 
Wednesday evening and Principal 
George F. Jewett presented diplomas 
to 34 graduates. The formal exercises 
which vrere curtailed on account of 
the heat were followed by a reception 
in the gy mnasium. 

Song Thrown In. 

Eggs that are chqap sometimes do 
when you put them to your ear. — Bos- 
ton Transcript. 


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Last Friday was an ideal Memorial 
Day, — not alone in weather condi- 
tions, which were nearly perfection, 
but in the unusual observance of the 
day by Charles Ward Post G. A. R. 

The official orders, as printed re- 
cently in the Graphic were carried 
out to the letter and included the work 
of details of the Post in the morning, 
decorating the graves at the various 
cemeteries, and the usual impressive 
exercises at St. Mary’s churchyard, 
Newton Ixiwer Falls, and the casting 
of flowers into the adjacent Charles 
river in memory of our sailor dead. 
The Newton Highlands Improvement 
Association served an excellent lunch 
to the Post and the staff of the 
Chief Marshal, in Lincoln Hall, a wel- 
coming address being made by the 
president. Mr. James Kingman, and 
the service being in the hands of a 
bevy of young ladies. 

The usual parade was formed by 
Chief of Staff. Major J. C. DeMille 
in the streets near the Hyde school, 
and the procession marched thru Lin- 
coln street, and Walnut street to the 
Newton Cemetery in the following or- 
der: 

Detail of Police 

Chief Marshal, Hon. Edwin O. Childs 
Adjutant General Chief of Staff 

Aides and Associate ipembers and 
members o f the city government 

Co. A. 11th Regt. Mass. State Guard. 

Capt. Henry W. Crowell 
Co. C. 101st Infantry, U. S. A, 
Capt. H. D. Cormerais 
Band 

J. Wiley Edmands Camp, S. V. M. 

Edward A. Cauldwell, Commanding 

Charles Ward Post. G. A. R. 

Chas. W. Coleman. Commander 
Thomas Burnett Camp. S. W. V. 

George Wascott, Commander 

Mrs. A. E. Cunningham Tent, D. V. 
Mrs. Ruth B. Williams. President 
Boy Scouts 

J. C. Irwin, Commissioner 

For the first time in its history, the 
members of the Post rode in automo- 
biles. only four members making the 
march on foot. 

The presence of the C Co. boys un- 
der command of Capt. Cormerais was 
also an interesting feature and the 
sqpiall crowds along the way made up 
in enthusiasm what they lacked in 
numbers. The writer has attended 
the Memorial Qpy exercises for many 
years, but the popular interest last 
Friday was noticeably absent, there 
being but few people along the route 
of the parade and the Cemetery. 

There was also an unusual observ- 
ance at the Cemetery exercises around 
the soldiers’ monument. Past Dept. 
Commander Alfred A. Wetherbee read 
the Gettysburg address in his usual 
impressive manner, reports were re- 
ceived and the orders of the day read. 
C Co. then laid a beautiful wreath at 
the foot of the monument for the boys 
who had given their lives in the s war 
just ended, and ex-alderman E! G. 
Hapgood laid another wreath for the 
city of Newton and made a most elo- 
quent memorial address. 

To the ve'terans of the Cijril War. 
he said. “We shall never forget that 
your deeds of half a century ago gave 
to the world a new vision” of the 
matchless valor of American hearts 
and the deathless glory of American 
arms." Nor that it was your policy of 
magnanimity and reconciliation that 
| made possible: "the indissolvable un- 
ion of American states and the im- 
perishable brotherhood of the Ameri- 
can people." 

One year ago the American forces 
had not been proved. Then the high 
tide of Prussian forces was rolling to- 
| wards Paris. The French were reel- 
[ ing back, when there entered a new 


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Established 1840 

564 COMMONWEALTH AVE., NEWTON CENTRE 
Newton South 1640 


THE SECOND CHURCH 

WEST NEWTON 

Sunday, June S 

CHILDREN’S Day Festival Service 
MB. l'ARK will preach 
The Auxiliary Choirs will sing 
All Seats Free 


and untried force, which gave its an- 
swer In deeds not words, and formed 
.a spear head on which the Prussian 
broke and fled. From that hour these 
men have never known defeat. All 
this was done at a great price and a 
great sacrifice and they have laid the 
splendor of their youth on the altar 
of their country We pay unstinting 
honor In recognition of that service. 
It remains for us to do our part and 
for one thing, we should do all we can 
to discourage such propaganda as that 
.issued by “The Association to Op- 
pose War” which is organized to 
“work in opposition to every kind of 
.war and violence.” Mr. Hapgood clos- 
ed by reading the poem 'Friends of 
the World" written after the death of 
Theodore Roosevelt. 

The following ladies served as mark- 
ers at the four corners of the monu- 
ment. Mrs. Esther Scribner. Mrs. Ed- 
ward N. Soulis. Mrs. David Donovan 
and Mrs. W. A. Wetherbee. 

The procession then refo: med and 
marched to Temple Hall. Ne vtonvllle, 
passing the John A. Andrew home on 
Washington park ’in order to pay a 
marching salute to its inmat ?s. 

The usual Memorial Day banquet 
was served at Temple Hal! with Com- 
mander Charles W. Coleman acting 
as toastmaster. The first spe tker was 
Mayor Childs, the Chief Ma shal. Mr. 
Childs said in part: — For fifty years 
we have especially honored the GraryT 
Army on Memorial Day. and they haJfe 
kept the fires of patriotism burning. 
Their patriotic instruction in irmr 
schools led our boys to answer the 
first call to arms and our older men to 
form the State Guard and the Newton 
Constabulary and compelled all our 
people to do all they could to win the 
war. It was a wonderful spirit which 
led us to free civilization and to save 
the world. The future has more dif- 
ficulties than war. This is no time 
for relaxation and there is danger in 
over confidence and in under estimat- 
ing our tasks. 

Capt. Cormerais wanted attention 
called to a proposed mass meeting in 
Newton on June 16th to organize a 
local unit in the American Legion. He 
referred to the men he had commanded 
that day saying that while they had 
had but little close order marching 
they did know hoy to carry a 70- 
pound pack and hike across country. 
He praised the 26th Division which he 
said never failed to gain its objective 
and never failed to hold what it had 
gained. These men, he said, have come 
home 200 - better than when they 
went away. They do not want to be 
patronized, but you must give them 
•vhat is coming to them or they will 
know the reason why. There is no 
dojlar standard for them for after liv- 
ing in France for nearly two years 
without money, they can’t be bought 
now. He hoped a Memorial building 
would be erected so that the Grand 
Army might enjoy it before they pass- 
ed on and surely before it was too late 
for the veterans of the present war to 
enjoy it. 

Alderman Reuben Forknall said that 
he had been a member of the old Co. 
C in 1876 but he appreciated the fact 
that young and old now met a united 
band and that the first should be last 
and the last first. 

Capt. Crowell expressed the senti- 
ments of Co. A. and ten fered the Post 
any service it could render. 

Rev. Dr. Charles R. Ross of the New- 
tonville Methodist church said that 
the memory of those who wore the 
blue uniform will be sacred in our 
hearts as long as America was Amer- 
ica. To the younger men, he said, 
that they had done their work well, 
but there were yet battles to be 
fought and victories of peace to be 
won. Foes in our country and in our 
city cry out against the rtag and our 
principles and they must be fought 
to a finish, otherwise those 70.000 dead 
in France would have died in vain. 
Out of the war we have got a united 
country, a nation that can do things 
and no one will dare in the future to 
tread on liberty, or righteousness or 
humanity. 

The evening closed with the singing 
of America. 


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1‘. 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 6, 1919. 






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C. BRIGHAM COMPANY 


Auburndaie 

. — Mr. Clarence Tower and family 
have taken a cottage at Allerton and 
expect to make a long season. 

— Next Sunday will be observed by 
the Congregational church as Chil- 
dren’s Day, the entire morning service 
being given up to the children. Chil- 
dren will also be baptized. The Junior 
Choir will sing in the place of the reg- 
ular choir, and the Primary, Junior, 
and Intermediate Departments will all 
take part. Bibles will be given to all 
children who are seven years of age. 

— The Good Government Club will 
hold a meeting next Thursday evening 
in Norumbega Hall to consider the 
League of Nations. Mr. J. Porter Rus- 
sell of Newton and Mr. R. L. Bridg- 
man of Auburndaie will open the dis- 
cussion which will be followed by 
questions from the floor. An attempt 
will be made to embody the sentiment 
of the meeting in resolutions vrhich 
will be sent to the U. S. Senate. The 
meeting is public, and it is hoped that 
both men and women will be present 
and will take part in the discussion. 


SUMMER COMFORTS! 

Vudor Porch Shades keep 
your piazza and sleeping 
porch cool and shady. 
Come in all sizes. We have 
the most comfortable and 
attractive porch furniture 
including lamps, chairs 
and tables. Prices are right. 
Wayne Cedared Bags for 
putting away winter cloth- 
ing — and evening clothes 
— guaranteed to keep all 
dust and moths from in- 
juring garments. Fine for 
furs and fur coats. 

BEMIS & JEWETT 

Newton Centre and Needham 


Auburiidaie 

— Mr. and Mrs. Foff have rented Dr. 
Hutchinson’s place. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Murphy of Boston 
have Just returned to Central street. 

— Mrs. Clara B. Kimball has bought 
a home on Studio road of A. J. Peters, 
Trustee. 

— On Thursday Mrs. Olih F. Herrick 
gave a party for her little daughter, 
Helen, in honor of her 9th birthday. 

— At the meeting of the Knights of 
King Arthur last Monday night, Theo- 
dore Ruggles was chosen Pendragon. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Robert James of Cen- 
tral street have taken Dr. Hutchinson’s 
house at Shirley Point for the summer. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Herman Goldberger 
of Central terrace spent the holiday 
at their summer cottage at Nantasket. 

— Mrs. William Herron and daughter 
of Inverness. Florida, are spending the 
summer with Mrs. Mary E. Herron of 
Lexington street. 

— Miss Heloise Kennedy has gone 
with Dr. and Mrs. Littig to attend the 
graduation of Mr. Sidney Littig from 
the Univ. of Penn.. Philadelphia. 

— Mrs. C. E. Harrington of Maple 
street has opened her summer cottages 
at Gloucester for the season. She will 
go to Gloucester for the summer on 
July 1st. 

— Hermann Perkins, Eliot Stickney,. 
William Eaton. John Draper and War- 1 
ren Conn spent three days recently at 
George Fisk’s summer cottage at Es- 
sex, Mass. 

— Money deposited in Auburndaie 
Co-operative Bank goes on interest 
monthly. Interest is compounded 
four times a year,. La3t dividends at 
rate of 6 Vz ner cent. advt. 

— Next Monday night the Knights of 
King Arthur will hold a welcome 
meeting to welcome the 75 w r ho have 
been in service. Dr. and Mrs. Gordon 
will be guests of the occasion. 

— Mrs. Chauncey B. Conn and her 
daughter. Muriel, are going to North 
Conway for June. During July and 
August they will go to their cottage on 
The Lynn Shore Drive. 

— Auburndaie is proud that one of 
her sons. Capt. Edward Edmunds of 
Melrose street, has won the Distin- 
guished Service Cross for bravery at 
Verdun. Captain Edmunds’ company. 
Company E of Connecticut, presented 
him with a grafanola. He recently 
married Miss Frances Barrett of 
Upper Falls and is now on his honey- 
moon. 


INTERESTING MEETS 

(Continued from Page 1) 


of granite. He believed the latter 
was the cheapest in the long run. Al- 
derman Madden said that concrete 
ought not to be used on a street like 
Cook street, and Alderman Blake said 
that concrete was not first class con- 
struction. President Harriman took 
the floor to favor large appropriations 
for curbing, which he said added so 
much to the neat appearance of the 
city. He favored large expenditures 
and while there was no question as to 
the superiority of granite, concrete 
could well be used on streets which 
were not thorofares. Concrete curb- 
ing had been used on Adams street 
with no fault to find and with the 
large difference in cost, the board was 
justified in saving the difference be- 
tween the two forms of construction. 
An amendment to increase the order 
to $2965 was defeated and the $1965 
appropriation authorized. 

There was another logn debate over 
$500 asked for clerical assistance by 
the Comptroller. Alderman Hollis 
said that something was evidently the 
trouble in this office and it was the 
duty of the board to find out what it 
was. He wanted a special committee 
to investigate but could get no second 
to his motion. Alderman Blake said 
there was no need of any investigation 
and warmly praised the work of the 
Comptroller and favored even larger 
appropriations if necessary. The or- 
der was then passed, Mr. Hollis voting 
No. 

The Finance committee presented 
a hot report on the matter of archi- 
tects commissions for work on the 
school buildings required by the State 
Police. This bill, was improperly in- 
curred and the city not legally liable. 
In view of the fact that the board had 
voted $25,000 for a part of this work, 
the committee favored a payment of 
6 r; commission on the work so au 
thorized, less payments already made 
on account. $900 was thereupon au 
thorized. 

There was also a debate upon the 
report of the License committee fav- 
oring a location for a gasolene filling 
station by the Jenny Mfg. Co. in No- 
nantum square- opposite the Fire sta- 
tion. It was opposed by Aldermen 
Goodwin, Kendrick, and Heathcote 
and favored by Alderman Hollis, Car- 
ter. Clement, Whidden and McAuslan 
and finally grante‘d by a vote of 15 to 
6 . 

The Liberty Motor Mart was granted 
a gasolene permit for 1000 gallons at 
1203 Washington street and the M. & 
B. St. Rwy. Co. were granted pole lo- 
cations on Homer street and Walnut 
street and the Tel. Co. and Edison Co. 
a joint pole on Ricker road. 

The board adjourned at 10.55. 


NEW llAMrslIIHE DAY AT 
VALLEY FORGE 


AN APPEAL FOR JEWISH RIGHTS 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
.Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, flext of kin, cred- 
itors. and all other persons inter- 
ested in the estate of Mary Sheehan 
late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. intestate. 

WHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter I 
of administration on the estate of said 
deceased to John J. Sheehan of New- 
ton in the County of Middlesex, with- 
out giving a surety on his bond. 

A'ou are hereby cited to appear at a I 
Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge, in suid County of Middlesex, 
on the twenty-sixth day of June A. D. 
1919. at nine o’clock in the forenoon, 
to Bhow cause if any you have, why | 
the same should not be granted. 

And the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper 
publishd in Newton the last publica- 
tion to be one duy, at least, before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Melntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
fourth day of June in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and niueteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

June 6-13-20 


AWOMOBIE INSUBANCk 

AT COST 
• WwPu V iflore • 

Massachusetts Mutual Auto. Ins. Ca 
Automobile Mutual Liability Ins. Ca 
10 Cent ml Street, Boston 


The efforts now being so energeti- 
cally made before the Peace Confer- 
ence at Paris, to assure the Jewish 
People equal rights with the rest of 
the population of each and every coun- 
try, and the dfemand that the protec- 
tion of these rights shall be assured 
of at all times by the proposed League 
of Nations, must not be abated. 

Jewish people have been shamefully 
persecuted and systematically slaugh- 
tered by terrible pogroms in the small 
independencies which have arisen 
w'ithin the last year. These indepen- 
dencies have not fulfilled their obliga- 
tion to protet the civic rights of their 
Jewish residents. 

Only last week the sight of 25,000 
Jews marching thru the streets of 
Boston in dignified protest at the 
atrocities in Poland and elsewhere 
showed how deeply our Jewish fellow 
citizens hope that religious discrimin- 
ation will be abandoned. At a recent 
meeting, in Boston, of the “Jews of 
America,” a resolution was adopted as 
follows: “to secure for Jews equal, 
civil, religious, political, and econom- 
ic rights and opportunities in all 
countries of the world; to ask finan- 
cial assistance for the Jews in Poland, 
Roumania and Palestine who have 
been objects of attacks and who have 
not received their proportionate share 
of help.” 

The Jewish residents of the City of 
Newton appeal to their fellow citizens 
for contributions to alleviate the suf- 
ferings of the destitute people in Eu- 
rope. 

Contributions may be sent to Mayor 
Edwin O. Childs. Newton, Mass., Mr. 
Ixmis J. Fried. 310 Watertown street, 
Newton, and Mr. John W. Murphy, 
Watertown street, Newton, Mass. 


BIRTHDAY PARTY 


AUCTION 

SALES 

We held fifteen Auction Sales 
last Year — every one being suc- 
cessful — a record no other Auc- 
tioneer in this community can 
claim. 

Let Us Sell Your Real Estate 
at Auction. 

J. EDWARD GALLANAN 

Real Estate Broker and 
Auctioneer 

271 WASHINGTON STREET 
NEWTON 


Merchant's Co-operative Bank 

19 Milk Street, Boston 

BERTRAM D. BLAISDELL ALBERT E. DUFF1LL 

President Treasurer 

Money to loan on Real Estate 
First mortgages only Owner and occupant preferred 
Assets, $6,601,378.76 

Dividends for past year at rate of 5J4% per annum 

BEGIN NOW TO PAY OFF THAT MORTGAGE 
June Shares Now on Sule 



The eleventh Birthday Party of the 
Palestine Chapter of the O. E. S. last 
Tuesday was a memorable affair. The 
banquet was in charge of Mrs. Eliza 
beth M. Wilkins and a committee of 
30. and about 250 were present. 

The hall was beautifully decorated. 
On each of the 10 tables was a bas- 
ket of bridlewreath and iris, while 
from the June boxes on each table ex- 
tended Streamers to each plate con- 
taining conundrums. Two hosts and 
two hostesses presided over each ta- 
ble, and a young son and daughter of 
the members waited upon the table. 
The presiding officers were Miss Ger- 
trude Spear. W. M., and Mr. Everett 
W. Crawford, AV. P. 

A reception followed the banquet. 
In the reception line were the follow- 
ing brothers from the Palestine Chap- 
ter who have returned from service: 
Major Lewis E. Moore, Lieut. Warren 
W. Mar. stun. Lieut. Theodore Lock- 
wood, and Corporal Lewis Littlehale. 
Also in the receiving line were Mrs. 
Lilian F. Leonard, D. G. M., and Miss 
Annie M. Corse, D. G. M., both Past 
Matrons of the Palestine Chapter who 
have received appointments in the 
Grand Chapter. 

The entertainment was furnished by 
Mrs. Millicent Stranger, reader; Mrs. 
Clare Crowley, soprano; Miss Helen 
Walker, soprano, Mrs. R. Grace 
Moore, contralto. The Handlin Sis- 
ters gave impersonations, and Cun- 
ningham's orchestra furnished the 
music. 


MIL,L,IINERY 8ALB 

MLLE. CAROLINE 

Many of Her Exclusive Models 
Have Now Reached the Department 

$5.00 and $6.00 

No Two Alike in Form or Color 
480 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON 
Block of Brunswick Hotel 


Mr. Arthur E. Pearson and Miss 
Pearson of Otis and Chestnut streets, 
West Newton, gave an informal din- 
ner at the Bcllevue-Strntford in 
Philadelphia on the evening of Mem- 
orial Day in honor of the Right 
Reverend Thomas J. Garland, D.D., 
Bishop Suffrngran of tho Diocese of 
Pennsylvania and Mrs. Garland, and 
their guests who attended the Dedica- 
tion of the New Hampshire Bay in the 
Cloister of the Colonies of the Wash- 
ington Memorial Chapel at Valley 
Forge, Pennsylvania, the gift of Mr. 
Pearson. Mr. William Henry Pearson 
attended. The Dedication party also 
included the Hon. Hobart Pillsbury, 
Deputy Secretary of State, Delegate to 
the Dedication of the New Hampshire 
Bay, appointed by His Excellency 
John H. Bartlett, Esq., Governor, as 
his representative, who tendered the 
greetings of the State. Rev. Samuel 
Atkins Eliot, D.D.. President of the 
American Unitarian Association, who 
gave the Address. Miss Eliot, Mr. Otis 
G. Hammond, of Concord, N. H., Sup- 
erintendent of the New Hampshire 
Historical Society, Hon. Oscar Avery 
Mnrden and Mrs. Marden of Stough- 
ton. Mr. Walter Kendall Watkins of 
Malden, and a summer resident of 
New Hampshire, sometime Historian- 
General of The National Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution, rep- 
resenting the Massachusetts Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion and the Society of Colonial Wars 
in the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, who made a personal gift to 
Rev. W. Herbert Burk. D.D., Rector of 
the Chapel and President of the Val 
ley Forge Museum of American His- 
tory consisting of a Valley Forge 
muster roll of the officers of Col. 
Wigglesworth’s Massachusetts Regi- 
ment. Dr. Gporge H. Talbot and Mrs. 
Talbot of Newtonville, Mrs. Hanna S. 
Holmes Wiswell of Wellesley, Mr. 
George F. Larcom and Mrs. Larcom 
of West Newton, Miss Helen P. War- 
ren of West Newton, Dr, Susan M. 
Coffin of Boston, Miss Clara C. Hewins 
and Miss Josephine Hewins of Ded- 
ham. Miss Henrietta Rockwood of 
Roxbury, Mr. Edward Lowry Pearson 
of Brockton. Mass.. Mr. Thomas N. 
Jamqs and Miss Mildred E. James of 
New York City, and Mrs. Francis Col- 
gate Dale of Cold Spring on-the-Hud- 
son. Some of the party were obliged 
to return on the Federal Express Fri- 
day night, the others went to New 
York on Saturday where they were 
registered at The Biltmore. 


NEWTON’S WAR MEMORIAL 


N. H. S. 


Fred Sawyer, captain of the base- 
ball team is making arrangements to 
join the Portland, Maine, club of the 
New England League. He will go to 
Portland. June 25, but will not- sign 
a contract however until Newton fin- 
ishes the season. Arrangements are 
being made for a post season game 
with Boston College High which will 
probably be played at Braves Field or 
Fenway Park. Newton has practi- 
cally clinched the Suburban League 
championship and B. C. High is a 
certain winner of the Boston City 
League Championship. 

This year’s class hymn has been 
written by Edna McGregor and will 
be sung to the music written by Men- 
delssohn for Burns’ Oh, Wert Thou 
in the Cauld Blast. 

It is hoped that the Newtonian will 
be issued about .Ituie 10. This is un- 
certain however as the publication 
has been considerably delayed by a 
strike of engravers. 

On Thursday morning Memorial 
Day exercises were held in the assem- 
bly hall. After a prayer by Mr. 
Adams, Harry Watson recited Lin- 
coln’s Gettysburg address. The first 
speaker was Lieut. Louis Ranlett, who 
was severely wounded while on active 
duty in France. Lieut. Ranlett spoke 
very interestingly of his many adven- 
tures and told in detail an especially 
exciting one in which it was his duty 
to go into No Man’s Land with a squad 
of men to bring back the wounded. 
The next speaker was Captain Ryan, 
a civil war veteran who might well be 
proud of his service record. He was 
with Custer fighting the Indians and 
was wounded fivo times in the fight- 
ing during the early part of the war. 
It is very seldom that the school has 
opportunity of hearing a speaker 
who has had the experiences that 
Captain Ryan has had. 

This year’s honor list contains the 
names of twenty four girls and fifteen 
hoys. I?irst honors go to Robert E. 
Anderson, Jr. and second honors to 
Ruth Anson Belcher. In order to be 
on the honor list one must have at- 
tained the rank of eighty or above for 
the entire school course. 

On Thursday a debate was held be- 
tween the sophomore classes of Miss 
Smith and Miss Richardson on the 
subject, Capital Punishment should be 
abolished. Miss Richardson’s side 
which had the negative won. The de- 
baters for the negative were Rey- 
nolds, Alingham and Richards, for the 
affirmative, tMurshall Hayden and 
Smith. 


Newton Highlands 


— The estate at 19 Bowdoin street 
has been sold to Mabel R. Steere of 
Brookline. 

— A garage has been built in the 
renr or the Hutchinson residence on 
Allerton road. 

A social dance will he given by 
Wanetu Associates at Lincoln Hull, 
Thursday evening, June 12tli. 

— Commander \V. A. Hall of the Bu- 
reau of Navigation lias been visiting 
Mrs. Stephen A. Wiswell for a few 
days. 

— On Wednesday, May 28th, a son, 
Lyman Newell Robinson, was born to 
Mr. and Mrs. WIubIow D. Robinson of 
10 Hyde street. 

-Tho Women Associates voted on 
Tuesday to give $750 for Serbian re- 
lief. $500 for Polish relief, and $250 for 
work among our own sudors. 

— During tho absence of the Rev. 
George Smart for the month of June, 
tho Rev. Charles White of Newton 
Highlands has been officiating at the 
Congregational church. 

Edward K. Gibbs 1ms purchased 
tho estate at No. 257 Lake aveuue tho 
property is assessed for $6,700. With 
t lie house are 12.000 feet of land. Char- 
lotte K. Small was the gruntor. 


To the Editor: — 

A letter received by me from an 
architect Is especially worthy of con- 
sideration as it reflects a view prob- 
ably hold by some othors. Referring 
to the widely approved Idea of a me- 
morial on Claflln Field In which, with 
a memorial portico and shrine, there 
should bo associated a citizens' hall 
o( physical training, a center for com- 
munity welfare societies, and a civic 
auditoriuril, the writer says: — 

“We should have such a building in 
Newton, along the lines mentioned in 
your circular, and it would fill a great 
need, but I believe it is wrong to call 
such a building a memorial. . 

A memorial should be in tho fullest 
sense of the word a memorial, and 
nothing else.” 

This seems to assume that a memo- 
rial in the best sense can be nothing 
but some material thing, expressing 
some ideal with beauty or strength, 
but essentially devoid of utility. 
Gravestones are such; and, ignoring 
their incidental utilities, so are the 
Pyramids, the Lion of Lucerne, the 
Bunker Hill Monument, the Statue 
of Liberty, the Shaw Memorial. A1 
though these are national monuments, 
perhaps beyond the power of a local 
community to command, they will 
serve as types for discussion. 

My answer is that sculpture is only 
one form of memorial. Even archi- 
tecture, which ministers to all the arts 
and to the utilities, is only one of the 
voices that may proclaim honor. Two 
examples: 

An eating house is certainly prosa- 
ic; and an auditorium is utilitarian; 
but "Memorial Hall’ at Cambridge 
which combines these two incongru- 
ous elements, has been in the fullest 
sense of the word a memorial, a more 
worthy and effectual memorial of the 
sons of Harvard whose names are 
wrought in its transept than any stone 
monument or arch which the art of 
its age could have produced. Young 
men. amounting now to many thous- 
ands, whose daily fortune it has been 
and is to pass among those names, in 
that memorial setting, cannot fail to 
absorb something of the spirit of the 
men there honored. The association 
of the College commons and the Col- 
lege theatre with the Memorial has 
made the memorial real. 

A young man of promise died in 
China. His memorial Is the “Leland 
Stanford, Jr., University,’’ instituted 
in his name with its endowment of 
$30,000,000, to give instruction free to 
all and to help carry forward that 
civilization from which his contribu- 
tion was cut off. Absolutely utilita- 
rian, one cannot deny the greatness, 
nor the beauty, nor the strength of 
this university as a memorial. And 
Leland Stanford, Jr., whose name and 
honoring are preserved in the title of 
the memorial, is honored more per- 
petually and more insistently in this 
institution than by any mere monu- 
ment. arch, or architectural structure. 

This uncovers the truth that a memo- 
rial may be an institution. An insti- 
tution is greater than the materials 
that compose its buildings. 

It has been said that our Newton 
memorial ought not to be a building, 
because the memorial should be more 
permanent than a building, and should 
be, for example, a memorial arch. 
Architecture ministered in this form 
to the memory of Lelaiid Stanford, Jr., 
in the magnificent memorial arch, one 
hundred' feet high, with its frieze rep- 
resenting "Progress of Civilization in 
America,” constituting the main gate- 
way to the University buildings, and 
undoubtedly surpassing any material 
thing that Newton could have. 

As it happens .that arch has perish- 
ed already. Yet the Institution lives 
on. All of the buildings might fall; 
yet the Institution would live on. 

Let us have in Newton a memorial 
fashioned with such art of form as 
our architects and sculptors can com- 
mand. | Let it have a feature which, 
like the transept at Memorial Hall, or 
the monument at the gate of Soldiers’ 
Field, or the memorial arch of Le- 
land Stanford, Jr., University shall al- 
ways express honor to the names 
there enshrined; but let the memorial 
as a whole he something to honor 
them in a higher, a truer and a more 
effectual sense than by being merely 
a beautiful stone marker. Let it be 
also an institution. Let it have life 
which shall breathe the spirit of the 
Honored. Let it not be a place where 
future citizens shall merely pause and 
look. Let it rather, and in addition, 
be a place where future citizens, even 
in spite of themselves, shall absorb 
something of democracy, something of 
loyalty, even something of heroics. 

I do not undervalue the power of 
art, nor of the purely ideal; especi- 
ally when executed in a grand and 
national way. But I believe that what- 
ever our community can command of 
art can wisely be coupled with some 
living influence which will in a pracr 
tical and useful way hand down to 
generations to come tho spirit thai| 
spurred us to war and maintained us 
to victory. 

Respectfully, 

EVERETT E. KENT. 



CLEANSING 


At Its 


BEST 


AT 


LEW A 


OS 


AMERICAS GREATEST 

CLEANSERS DYERS 

LAUNDER ERS 

Packages Called For and Delivered in the Newtons from Watertown Shop at Works 

Telephone 300 Newton North 

“You Can Rely on Lewandos” 

Boston New York Philadelphia 


DORCHESTER AWNING CO., INC. 

AWNINGS 



TENTS 

WATERPROOF 

HORSE AND WAGON COVERS 

ROOFING DUCK 

WEDDING CANOPIES AND LARGE TENTS TO LET 

AWNINGS TAKEN DOWN AND STORED 

Factory and Salesroom* 1548-1558 DORCHESTER AVE., 
Telephone Dorchester 722 BOSTON 


Newton 


-The annual meeting of the Newton 
Woman’s Club will be heAd in the Fall. 

- Mrs. G. D. Gilman of Vernon court 
is at Abbott Hill, Wilton, N. H., for 
the summer. 

— Lieut. Kenway, son of Mrs. H. P. 
Kenway, of Centre street, has just 
been promoted t/6 a captaincy in the 
United States Reserve Army. 

— Next Sunday morning Channing 
Church will observe Children’s Day in 
the place of the regular services. There 
will be stinging and recitations by the 
children, and special music. 

— Oil Sunday evening at 7.30 there 
will be a service for returned soldiers 
at GJTace Church. All those belonging 
to tfie church are asked to attend if 
possible in uniform. All soldiers are 
cordially Invited and are asked to come 
if possible in uniform. The address 
will/ be by the Rev. Edward P. Sullivan 
of Trinity Church, Newton Centre. 

-The Methodist Church will have 
its 'Children’s Day service at 4 P. M. 
nexi\ Sunday. There will be recitations 
and singing by the members of the 
Primary and Junior Departments. At 
the hiornlng service children will be 
christened, and new members received 
into the church. About 20 new mem- 
bers arp expected to join the church at 
this time. 


LIBRARY NOTES 


It is refreshing on these hot days to 
step into the library and look at tho 
pictures of ice-bergs and maps of the 
Scott and Amundsen expeditions. Oue 
sees the training of the dogs and the 
transporting of the goods which took 
place in New Zealand. “In the Grip 
of the Antartie Ice" gives one a good 
idea of the dangers to be overcome. 
Very unusual ure the protographs of 
spray ridges of ice ufter a blizzard, 
and of the pressure ridge. The cloud 
effects, too, are worthy of note. A 
member of the party writes, “It would 
he difficult to describe our surround- 
ings in sufficiently glowing terms.” 
The photographs of Mt. Erebus, a 
snowy peak with a smoking summit 
and of Castle Borg give some idea of 
the grandeur. 



WEDDING GIFTS 
In 

Percolators and dialing 
Dishes 

Trays and Table Cutlery 

.-41 SUMMER ST. BOSTON* 



QUALITY- DURABIlllY- ECONOMY 


It’s time to think about 
protection for your House, 
also its appearance. Ask 
us about the above line of 
Paint, Stains, etc. 

Chandler & Barber Co. 

124 Summer St., Boston 


HARRIS E. JOHONNOT 

Electrician and Contractor 

13« PEARL ST, NEWTON 
Order Office 392 Centre St, Newton 
Telephone 1671-J Newton North 


REAL ESTATE 
NEWTONS ! ! 

NEWTON REAL ESTATE 
OWNERS; Our spring season is 
here and we are having an un- 
usual demand for real estate of 
all kinds. Whether your house 
is for sale or to rent it will be 
to your best interests to list par- 
ticulars with us immediately. A 
card or ’phone call will bring a 
representative and expert ad- 
vice will be given gratia. 

We respectfully solicit your 
patronage and assure you per- 
sonal interest and active service 
— at all times. 

See Us First! 

John T. Burns & Sons, Inc. 

363 CENTRE ST., NEWTON 
807 Washington St, NewrtonvIUe 
Com. Ave., cor. Manet RtL, N. C. 

Tel. 570-424 New. No. 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Julia Sullivan late of New- 
ton in said County, deceased. 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will and tes- 
tament of said deceased has been pre- 
sented to said Court, for Probate, by 
Patrick C. Cotter who prays that let- 
ters testamentary may be issued to 
him, the executor therein named, with- 
out giving a surety on his official 
bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, on 
the twenty-third day of June A. D. 
1919, at nine o’clock in the forenoon, 
to show cause, if any you have, why 
the same should not be granted. 

Anif said petitioner is hereby di- 
rected to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in oacli 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the last publication to 
be one day, at least, before said Court, . 
and by mailing postpaid, or delivering 
a copy of this citation to all known 
persons interested in tho estate, seven 
days at least before said Court. 

Witness, Charles .1. Melntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
twentieth day of May in the year one , 
thousand nine hundred and nineteen. 


TmL 174 Newton North 

June 6-13-20 


New York’s 


Most Artistic Designer 

JUc 

of 

Coats, Wraps, 

Street and Evening Gowns 

WEDDING 

GOWNS A SPECIALTY 

419 Boylston St., Boston 

Enter 399 Boylston St., Room 325 

Phone B. B. 7120 


Painting, 

Paper Hanging 

Estimates ilnfiivl 

f|M|| ft ■ ■ A A ! rt 43 

Cheerfully [JBdff 

6 ana Aucoin 

Given 

U UIIU nuuuill Street 

Telephone Day 

or Night 1077-W North 


V 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 6, 1919. 



WALDORF 

p 

R 

E 

S 

E 

N 

o 

N 

THEATRE 

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Y 

WALTHAM 

Afternoons 2.30 to 4.30 Evenings Continuous 7 to 10.45 

T 

1 

N 

B 

1 

Week of June 9th 

\A 

V 

c 

V 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday 

A 

U 

A 

R 

1 

E 

GERALDINE FARRAR 

D 

E 

V 

1 

T 

Y 

in 

“The Hell-Cat” 

L 

L 

E 

T 

H 

A Woman’s Law of the Great Plains 

P 

H 

E 

A 

T 

Three Headline Acts 

O 

T 

n 

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E 

Special Comedy, Orchestra, Etc. 

p 

O 

U 

Thursday Friday Saturday 

L 

A 

Y 

T 

S 

1 

D 

REX BEACH’S 

s 

c 

E 

O 

g— 

“The Crimson Gardenia" 

o 

N 

C 

E 

F 

B 

A Story of Bogus Money and Honest Hearts 

R 

T 

O 

S 

T 

Three llii Star Acts 

O 

,R 

■ 

o 

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Special Comedy - Orchestra 

AND 

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H 

E 


40 Degrees Cooler 

Than the Street 

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R 

A 


DYNAMITE OUTRAGE 

Attempt to Destroy Residence of Repres- 
entative Leland Powers in Newtonviile 


Tho entire city was startled and the 
residents in the vicinity of Grove Hill, 
Newtonviile, were badly frightened 
Just after midnight on Monday by a 
loud explosion, caused by dynamite 
or a bomb on the premises of Repre- 
sentative Leland Powers on Beaumont 
avenue, Newtonviile. The explosive 
was placed against the back of the 
house, between the kitchen and tho 
pantry, and adjoining the bulkhead 
to the cellar. Fortunately for Mr. 
Powers, it was placed immediately at 
the end of one of tho large beams sup- 
porting the house, and most of the 
force of the explosion was outward in 
consequence. A large hole was blown 
in the underpinning of the house, the 
frame and doors of the bulkhead were 
blown some distance and badly shat- 
tered, the gutter pipe was broken and 
twisted, some damage done to the 
eaves and the glass in nearly every 
window on that side of the house was 
blown to atoms. 

Representative Powers was sleep- 
ing in a room at the front of the 
house. His daughter, Polly, was on 
a sleeping porch at the second floor 
level, and his boy in a room adjoining. 
The cook, Rose Martin, was sleeping 
in a room off the kitchen fifteen feet 
from tho explosion. The cook was 
thrown out of bed, but was not in- 
jured. The nurse, Sarah Fallon, who 
was sleeping near tho children, 
screamed when the explosion took 
place and rushed toward the little 
girl’s room. The door was jammed, 
and was forced by Mr. Powers. The 
little girl s cheek was cut, but the boy 
was still sleeping. In the kitchen 
very near the explosion, was a dog, 
“Jerry,” and two kittens. "Tom” and 
“Pepper,” belonging to the children. 
They were unharmed, though covered 
with plaster and dust. 

“I was awakened,” states Mr. Pow- 
ers, “by a heavy explosion and the 
sound of crashing glass. It was just 
12.05 by my watch. I ran into the 
hallway to investigate. It was filled 
with a heavy smoke and odor. y 

“The nurse who cares for my 
daughter Polly and infant son Samuel, 
and the cook were both calling from 
their rooms. I first went to the chil- 
dren’s room and found them unin- 
jured. The cook was also unhurt, al- 
though she was sleeping within a few 
feet of what, seemingly, was the point 
of the explosion. 

“I tried to teleph.one for the police, 
but found the telephone either thrown 
out of order by the explosion, or cut 
off. I then ran across the street to 
neighbors, who had also been aroused 
by the explosion, and from there no- 
tified the police. They and the Fire 
Department responded in force with- 
in a few minutes. 

“In the interval, and with the police 
and fire officials, I investigated the 



/ 


RESIDENCE OF REPRESENTATIVE LELAND POWERS ON BEAUMONT AVENUE, NEWTON VILLE, SHOWING DAMAGE DONE BY EXPLOSION 


probable cause and damage. It Avas 
unmistakably a bomb, probably of dy- 
namite from the odor, that was used. 
The side cellar Avindows of the house 
are sunken slightly beloAv the grade, 
and in the little window Avell formed 
before one, in about the center of one 
side of the house, the explosive had 
been placed. 

“I have no suspicion of any indi- 
vidual or local enemy; I feel that I 
was probably included in an ‘enemy 
group’ because of my outspoken op- 
position to disorder by laAvless per- 
sons, and my advocacy of the Anti- 
Anarchy laws noAV in the Legislature.” 

Inspector Walter L. Wedger of the 
State Police gives his opinion that the 
explosion xvas caused by dynamite and 
that the persons responsible for the 
damage were undoubtedly unfamilar 


Avith its use or greater damage might 
have been caused. 

District Attorney Nathan Tufts of 
Middlesex county has offered a reAvard 
of $1000 for the arrest and conviction 
of the perpetrators of the deed. 

Taken in connection with similar 
outrages in other parts of the coun- 
try at about the same hour, it is also 
thought that it is part of an organized 
movement. 


MISS HI BBARD A BRIDE 


The marriage of Miss Amy Hub- 
bard. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Orrin 
(\ Hubbard of West Newton, to James 
Marland Abbott of LoAvell. will take 
place at Mount Vernon. N. H., the 
summer home of the bride’s parents. 
tomorroAv afternoon, June 7, at four 


o’clock. The officiating clergyman 
| Avill be Dr. Laurens Mac-Lure of Grace 
Church, Newton. Miss Hubbard avIII 
be attended by Miss Sarah Almy Mar- 
; ble of Worcester, and Miss Eleanore 
Holmes of West Newton. Mr. Ab- 
; bott’s best man is to be John B. 
Shearer of Boston, and the ushers are 
Edward M. Abbott of Westford; E. 
Howard George of Milton; Harry 
i Robbins of Somerville; Earnest E. 
Smith of Boston; Arthur Spalding of 
Lowell, and Philip H. Thayer of West 
Newton. Miss Hubbard Avas grad- 
uated from Smith college in 1912 and 
Mr. Abbott from Hazard in 189S. He 
is a member of several clubs. The en- 
gagement of Miss Hubbard to Mr. 
i Abbott was announced early last 
August, Avhile the family was at Mount 
i Vernon. 


HE MEN WAY — DELL 


Last Wednesday at 3 o’clock. Miss 
Mabel Ruth Hines Dell, daughter of 
Mrs. William A Dell of 50 Brooks 
avenue. Newtonviile. was married t 
Mr. Frank Eugene Hemenway, son 
Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Hemenwaj 
North Adams. Mass. The cerem 
which was a double ring service w* 
performed by Rev. Dr. Charles R 
Ross. The wedding was a very simple 
one without attendants. A reception 
at the home followed the ceremony. 
The house was very tastefully deco- 
rated Avith roses and ferns. A solo 
was sung by Mrs. George H. Griswold, 
aunt of the bride. After the honey- 
moon. Mr. and Mrs. Hemenway will 
be at home at 10 Concord street, Na- 
tick. 


"MIGHTY GOOD READING” 

is the way a distinguished educator describes the One Hundred Condensed 
Novels; “a Liberal Education in the Masterpieces of Fiction,” 

1 ' Now Appearing Exclusively in 


0&t0M 





Look Over This Schedule of Good Things Coming in the Next Three Weeks 


Friday, June 6 

The Newcomes 

BY THACKERAY 

Condensation by Churles K. Bol- 
ton, librarian of the Boston 
Athenaeum 

Saturday, June 7 

20,000 Leagues Under 
the Sea 

BY JULES VERNE 

Condensation by James B. 
Connolly 

Sunday, June 8 

Little Women 

BY LOUISA M. ALCOTT 

Condensation by Carolyn Wells 

Monday, June 9 

Richard Carvel 

BY WINSTON CHURCHILL 

Condensation by Hon. David I. 
Walsh, Ex-Gov. of Mass, and 
U. S. Senator 

Tuesday, June 10 

Tale of Two Cities 

BY DICKENS 

Condensation by Sara A. Hamlin 

Wednesday, June 11 

Westward Ho! 

BY CHARLES KINGSLEY 

Condensation by James B. 
Connolly 

Thursday, June 12 

Consuelo 

BY GEORGE SAND 

Condensation by Irving Bach- 
eller 

Friday, June 13 

Adam Bede 

BY GEORGE ELIOT 
Condensation by Editor Ellery 
Sedgwick of the Atlantic 
Monthly 

Saturday, June 14 

Tess of the 
D’Ubervilles 

BY THOMAS HARDY 
Condensation by Ruth McCall 

i i 

Sunday, June 15 

Don Quixote 

BY CERVANTES 
Condensation by Nathan Has- 
kell Dole 

Monday, June 16 

Paul and Virginia 

BY ST. PIERRE 

Condensation by Irving Bach- 
eller 

Tuesday, June 17 

Tom Brown’s 
Schooldays 

BY THOMAS HUGHES 
Condensation by Prof. W. F. 
Harris 

Wednesday, June 18 

Dombey and Son 

BY DICKENS 

Condensation by Caroline Tick- 
nor 

Thursday, June 19 

Romola 

BY GEORGE ELIOT 

Condensation by Prof. W. F. 
Harris 

Friduy, June 20 

Legend of Sleepy Hollow 

BY WASHINGTON IRVING 

Condensation by Mabel Herbert 
Urncr 

Saturday, June 21 

Wreck of the 
Grosvenor 

BY 

WILLIAM CLARK RUSSELL 
Condensation by Jumes U. 

Connolly 

Sunday, June 22 

The Right of Way 

BY SIR GILBERT PARKER 

Condensation by Helen B. Dole 

Monday, June 23 

Coniston 

BY WINSTON CHURCHILL 
Condensation b>* Hon. Samuel 
W. McCall, Ex-Gov. of Mass. 

Tuesday, June 24 

Far From the Madding 
Crowd 

BY THOMAS HARDY 
Condensation by Alfred S. Clark 

Wednesday, June 25 

The Deemster 

BY HALL CAINE 

Condensation by Caroline Tick* 
nor 

Thursday, June 26 

Hypatia 

BY CHARLES KINGSLEY 

Condensation by Prof. W. F. 
Harris 


BKjgT Be Sure to Have Post Containing These Condensations Follow You on Your Vacation! 






V 


THK NF.WT5injHX*m PB1DAT, Jim* It, 1M». 

■ | ill ' ' 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 


Nm*„ M MKMdHlUM ■»H i r , 


VS. MI 1’rtr Y«*r. Slngl* CoplM. « Ownt* 

Hy Mall Poatag* Frew. 

▲II money went at ••nder'a rUik. 

CbecWli and money order* should be made 
payable to 

NKWTON GRAPHIC PUBLISHING OO. 

J. C. Drimblwem, Tnaa 


I 


EDITORIAL 


While some of the public interest 
manifested last week in the hearing 
on a proposed Memorial and a New 
City Hall, was undoubtedly due to the 
efforts of a committee advocating a 
municipal gymnasium as such mem- 
orial. still there were enough others 
present to indicate that more than a 
transient interest is being taken in 
these important matters. 

While there was an emphatic ex- 
pression that the Memorial should not 
be combined with a New City Hall, we 
also fear that this result was due 
largely to the efforts of those who 
favor another form of Memorial. The 
expression that a City Hall was noth 
ing but an “office building” was re 
peated more than once and showed 
the bias behind it. As a matter o' 
fact, there are few more impres 
sive memorials than the Hall of Flags 
in our State House— a mere office 
building from one point of view — but 
the Hall of Flags is a Rlace which few 
can enter or pass bjTj without ex- 
periencing some feeling of awe and 
reverence. City Halls bam? of course, 
be “mere office buildings,” the present 
City Hall for instance, and yet, we 
have a feeling that a City Hall like 
that in Springfield, could be made a 
most impressive kind of Memorial, 
and one in which every citizen would 
take far more pride than in a munici- 
pal gymnasium or swimming pool. 
Moreover, we must take exceptions to 
' the evident intent of Capt. Cormerais’ 
remarks, that this Memorial is to be a 
meeting place or cluhroom. so to 
speak of the returned soldiers and 
sailors. We do not believe this will 
meet with popular approval. This 
Memorial should be raised to the men 
from Newton who have made the su- 
preme sacrifice and ought not to be 
profaned with tobacco smoke and 
ither attributes of a clubroom. 

„.We were rather surprised and 
ta UtIy pleased that there was so 
ohti’ri sentiment expressed, for a new 

_ Hall in the immediate future. 

, -Mayor Hutchinson advanced some 
i.rong arguments and Representa- 
tive Powers clearly indicated that this 
work ought to be done now’, if the 
financial interests of the city are to 
be considered. So far as the location 
is concerned, there is a strong moral 
obligation to build such a structure 
on and near the present building in 
West Newton. When the city govern- 
ment of two years ago accepted the 
splendid gift from residents of West 
Newton of land and buildings ap- 
proximating $75,000 for a site for a 
new City Hall, the city entered into. an 
agreement which it has no right, 
morally speaking, to break, no matter 
what the legal aspects of the case 
may be. The site ought to be con- 
sidered as settled and only the de- 
tails of the new building ought to be 
in question. 

— o — 

To those who understand the huge 
amount of work which has been done 
in the past twenty -years to improve 
traffic conditions in Nonantum Square, 
the action of the aldermen in granting 
a gas filling station opposite the en- 
gine house, is a tremendous surprise 
and disappointment. With all three 
aldermen from this village opposing 
the grant, it seems strange that the 
aldermen from other parts of the city 
should take the action they have. Resi- 
dents of other parts of the city cannot 
realize, even if they have, as sopie of 
the aldermen stated Monday evening, 
spent as much as a half hour studying 
the conditions, what a large amount of 
traffic is constantly moving thru this 
busy entrance to our city, and they 
cannot appreciate what it means to add 
a large number of automobiles to the 
present traffic. For many years we 
have fought to improve the trolley car 
conditions, and wiiile the present ar- 
rangement is not ideal it is far better 
than the old way of using the square 
as a terminal for both the Cambridge 
as well as the Brighton bound cars. 
Mayor Childs appreciated the condi- 
tions here, and for some years, a traffic 
officer in the centre of the square has 
been of great value. ’Even with these 
improvements, there are still frequent 
accidents and many “near” accidents 
in this place. Let us hope that the 
Mayor will again appreciate the con- 
ditions and veto the order passed by 
the aldermen. 

— o — 

Bolshevism and its allied forces 
seemed thousands of miles away from 
this peaceful city only last Monday, 
but with the attempt to dynamite the 
residence of Representative Leland 
Powers in Newtonville, we begin to 
realize that we must be up and doing 
all we can in this community to stamp 


GERANIUM and BEDDING PLANTS 
of Ml Kinds at 
NKWTON ROSE CONSERVATORIES 
R. C.' Rridghara. Prop. 

.129 Newtonville Avenue 
Newtonvlllo 

Telephone Newton North 404 


out these enemies of our country. This 
attack on Mr. Powers is only a sample 
of what will be hi store for all our 
public officials, if it is allowed to go 
unpunished. Governor Coolidge hns 
acted with hia usual wisdom in re- 
questing the legislature to pay for the 
damage out. of public funds, for the 
public is deeply interested in protect- 
ing its servants in every way possible. 


Don’t go 
away 

WITHOUT ORDERING THE 

Daily 

Transcript 


SENT TO YOUR 


SUMMER ADDRESS 


HARRY RODGERS 
Boston’s Famous Organist 
At Central Square Theatre 


DESPISE THE “HIGHER LIFE” 


8outh Sea Natives Satisfied and Joy- 
ous Among tho Primitive Surround- 
ings of Their Islands. 

Doctor Osier suggested nothing new 
—if he ever said it at all — for down 
among the South Sea islands the old 
are buried alive when they pass the 
period of usefulness. 

Martin Johnson showed motion pic- 
tures of natives dancing on the newTy 
made graves of the victims of this 
South Pacific “efficiency” when he 
and Mrs^ Johnson spoke before the 
National Geographic society at Wash- 
ington. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Johnson went 
"gunning” for the pictures among the 
numerous unexplored Islands which 
dot the South Pacific, an area that 
covers a tenth of the globe’s surface, 
and cpatains 20,000,000 Inhabitants. 
Ot these at lerfst 2,000,000, Mr. John- 
son estimated, still are savage enough 
“to believe the earth Is fiat, and they 
never heard of German ‘kultur’ or 
have been aqnoyed by book agents.” 

Native dances, which seemed amaz- 
ingly like' the steps of a Broadway 
chorus, were danced by maidens at- 
tired In nose sticks, huge earrings and 
necklaces, which seemed to comprise 
the complete attire dictated by the 
spring fashions of the Solomon Is- 
lands. The “open work ears," which 
had been distended by disks, that look 
like ear drums, often hung down to 
the shoulders. In Malaitn ; they are 
wearing strings of human teeth, and 
nothing else, this season. 

Mrs. Johnson told of the distinctive 
variety of “pidgin” i English spoken 
by the’ shore natives of various is- 
lands. There are as many as 400 dif- 
ferent tongues spoken by the various 
islanders, Mr. Johnson stated. Mrs. 
Johnson usually made friends with 
the natives, among whom, she naively 
stated, there probably was little more 
danger than among the white lights 
of Broadway. But this popularity oc- 
casionally had its disadvantages. 

The pictures showed the four coal- 
black wives of one native chief, who 
courteously offered to trade them all 
for the explorer’s wife. 

Cannibalism still exists In many of 
these islands, and Mr. Johnson showed 
one picture of natives hearing a huge 
bowl to the grove where they ob- 
served their ceremonials In connection 
with their human roasts. Amid a 
background of some of the most beau- 
tiful scenery to be found In the world, 
the speaker said, exist peoples of al- 
most animal-like savugery and feroc- 
ity, to whom torture and murder seem 
the favorite pastimes. 

MICKIE SAYS 


WELL IP tuts AIN’T 

OfcVSCrONDEST BUSINESS ▲NNVGV.N \ 
VIB.ST A BOOB COMAE IN *gifW AN AO 
AT "THE LAS’ NUNNIt N NNAVLES US LATE 

n Then yje haota stop ’n plane Of 

A mow CUT N THEN -TH PAPE. AS OOT * 
PULL OF ’LECVaiClTi N STUCK f’ EViESLT 
TWIN N VNUAPPEO’AOUNO TH ROLLERS 

n then th’ ink stavlteo stp.eaw.in’ , 

N THE BELT BOSTEO ‘N \Nl NIISSEO TH‘ 

; train with th sack o’ papers n sonie 

FOLKS COMAE PESTERIn'rOUNO AFTER 

their paper* h that samae boob conie 

IN V KICK ’BOOT A MISTAKE IN Tw’ AO *M» 
NOW I JEST PIEO THIS FORMA- -N-’n- 
OAWGONE TH’ DAWGON 6 LUCK AHVWAN 


42 ? 


1 ^ 


Roulette Gives Way to Pool at Aix-Le-Bains 


In the big gambling casino at Aix, which is leased by the Y. M. C. A., the 
American triune of skill has replaced the French game of chance. They 
had to hire the Yankee soldier to come to Aix, but one taste of “Y” 
hospitality and he had to be hired to stay away. 


CMAPteS 

(|V( OtEKi 

▼wraf 


“THE T SOUGHT SERVICE, NOT 
FAME,” SAY S GEOR GE W. PERKINS 

Chairman of War Work Finance Committee returns home and 
reports fully on monumental and efficient organization 
reared by Y. M. C. A. for service to A. E. F. 


George W. Perkins of New York, 
chairman of the finance committee of 
the War Work Council of the Y. M. 
C. A., has just returned from Europe, 
where he spent over four months in 
making a thorough investigation of 
the work done by the Y. M. C. A. 
Chairman Perkins’ report is an im- 
pressive exhibit of the prodigious 
service rendered by the great organiz- 
ation in all directions in the war land, 
and members and friends of the As- 
sociation may well feel that its big 
task was Well done. In his summary 
Perkins says: 

“No higher tribute could be paid to 
the work of the Y. M. C. A. than tha: 
which is now being paid by the Army 
Itself, for it is either taking over o. 
largely co-operating in the work oi 
continuing and enlarging the activities 
instituted by the Y- M. C. A. at the 
beginning of its work in Europe. 
After the armistice was signed, it was 
neither necessary ror practical tc 
keep the soldiers at military drill 
every day. Our men had not intended 
to enter the army as a permanent call- 
ing. They had simply gone into th 
war to whip Germany. When the jot 
was finished, they were through, am 
they wanted to come home immedi- 
ately and get to work at their civilian 
occupations. There were more than 
2.000.000 of them scattered through 
France and Germany. The greai 
question was how to occupy the tim* 
of these men, how to give them 
healthy occupation and at the same 
time prepare them, at least in soin« 
degree, for the work they were to taki 
up on returning home. The army at 
once turned to the Y. M. C. A. for help 
in solving this problem. Generu 
headquarters assigned many high of- 
ficers to co-operate In the work th« 
Y. M. C: A. was carrying on in alb-, 
letics, entertainment and educationa 
activities. 

“The Army has not taken over the 
Y. M- C. A.’s athletic and entertain- 
ment departments, but the officers o 
the Army are now closely associated 
with the Y. M. C. A. directors of 
these activities, and the two organiza 
tions, working in close co-operation, 
are today shaping the policy of en- 
tertainment and athletic activities, the 
Y. M. C. A. furnishing the money, 
and the Y. M. C. A. and Army joint- 
ly furnishing the personnel. I believe 
that the beneficial effects of the edu- 
cational program laid down by the Y. 
M. C. A., and the athletic activities It 
has carried on, have been so far- 
reaching that the War Department 
will hereafter continue these activities 
in our army in times of peace as 
well as in times of war. for many of- 
ficers have told me that the beneficial 
effect of these activities on the morale 
of the army could hardly be measured. 
Germany had nothing of this sort in 
its army, and its absence caused a 
great loss In the morale of its men. 

“One critic of the Y. M. C. A. In 
France stated that in his Judgment 
the outstanding mistake made by the 
Y. M. C. A- was in trying to have 
too large a staff of workers; that the 
Y. M. C. A. should have limited Itself 
to a staff of 500 men and women; that 


this number could have been so care- 
fully selected that each one would 
have been a star performer; that 
working in this way, the Y. M. C. A. 
could have made a pronounced suc- 
cess and would have had no criticism. 

“Had the Y. M. C. A. followed such 
a course, it would clearly have been 
thinking much more of its own repu- 
tation than of the service it could 
render. It is obviously ridiculous to 
•ay that the Y. M. C. A. could have 
icrformed greater service with 500 
very competent men and women than 
t performed with 11,000 or 12,000 men 
and women, some of whom proved 
^competent. 

“The Y. M. C. A. never solicited 
noney for the ptfrpose of giving away 
ts canteen supplies. If the Y. M, C. A. 
iad given away canteen supplies in 
France on the scale of its sales, it 
vould have spent in this activity alone 
at least as much money as its entire 
xpenditures in France for all its 
ictivities. The constant policy of the 
Y7 M. C. A. was to sell canteen sup- 
dies as nearly as possible at cost, 
and to bend every effort, when fighting 
vas in progress' to furnish the men 
at the front wRh supplies free of 
charg£ wherq it' was at all possible 
:o get the goods to them. 

“The Y. M. C. A’s definite program 
in Europe from the beginning, and 
continuously, has been to bend every 
■ffort and use every dollar it could 
obtain to occupy the leisure time of 
the soldiers, and to do this with vari- 
ous forms of entertainment, athletics, 
worth-while educational activities, etc. 
Ca.n there be any doubt that every 
i'ather and inoGv?*. every wife and 
sister, and the men themselves, will 
approve the Y. M. C. A-’s course in 
this respect? Is it not infinitely better 
to do everything possible to occupy 
the leisure time and to fill the long 
dreary evenings of the soldiers than 
to use the money in giving away a 
larger quantity of cigarettes, choco- 
lates and other similar articles? 

“The Y. M. C. A. tried to respond to 
every call that the Army made on ii 
It never hesitated to tackje any Job 
it was asked to undertake; it did not 
sidestep any task it was asked to 
perform- It took the position that it 
was in Europe to do all it could, as 
best it could; that when it was called 
on to render service of any kind, its 
duty was to respond in the same spirit 
that the soldiers (lid, and not hold hack 
because adverse circumstances might 
make it impossible to meet with max- 
imum success. The Y. sought service, 
not fame. Surely every contributor of 
money will approve the Y. M. C. A.’s 
course in this respect. 

“The vast work it has accomplished 
and is accomplishing in Europe can 
never be gauged at its true worth ex- 
cept by those who have seen it in its 
entirety. Whatever imperfections may 
have existed the results achieved are 
unquestionably so beneficial as to bo 
a source of deep satisfaction to those 
who so unselfishly served the cause 
and those who so generously contrib- 
uted the funds that made tho work 
possible.” 


“On Our Right We Have — ” 




-1 


NEWTON SAVINGS BANK 

INCORPORATED 1831 

The Oldest and Largest Bank in the City of Newton 

Deposit Now Interest Begins 

JULY 10 

The only Savings Bank in Newton paying 


Demonstration Home Garden 


The home gardener who has been 
onto his Job has already been out in 
his garden carefully scrutinizing his 
cabbages, peas and other vegetables for 
traces of plant lice. It is safe to say 
that these aphids can be found in any 
garden at this time, so it is well to be 
on the watch for these pests and have 
some spray material in preparation. 

Plant lice vary in size and color but 
may he recognized easily on account 
of their soft bodies with long legs and 
feelers. They are a very destructive 
pest as they breed in large numbers. 
It does not take long for a number of 
plant lice to suck the juices from a 
plant and kill it. 

Because they are a sucking insect 
they cannot be controlled by arsenical 
poisons or paris green. The aphid 
thrusts its sharp bill through the leaf 
of the plant and sucks the juices from 
within. They can be controlled by a 
contact spray, the purpose of which is 
to burn the tender body of the aphids. 

I’he two popular contact sprays for 
plant lice are the 40 per cent nicotine 
sulphate spray known on the market 
as “Black Leaf 40” and kerosene emul- 
sion. The home gardener usually has 
better results with the former spray as 
the kerosene emulsion often causes 
much damage to the plant itself unless 
it is properly prepared. 

Nicotine sulphate should be used at 
the rate of 1*4 teaspoonfuls “Black 
Leaf 40” and one cubic inch of soap 
per gallon of water. The soap helps as 
a spyader and sticker for the mixture 
and should always be added when the 
"Black Leaf 40” is used alone. The 
above proportion is stronger than what 
Is recommended on the package but we 
find that the manufacturers’ propor- 
tion is not strong enough in a great 
many cases. 

The other spray for plant lice — kero- 
sene emulsion — can either be pur- 
chased or manufactured at home. To 
make this spray dissolve one cubic 
inch of soap in a cup of water and boil 
on the stove a few minutes until the 
soap is thoroughly dissolved. When 
this has been accomplished remove the 
solution from the stove and add to it 
two cupfuls of kerosene. Stir very 
thoroughly until the solution becomes 
completely emulsified. The solu- 
tion must be violently agitated 
until a creamy mixture has been 
obtained. This solution must be 
diluted at the rate of one part to 
15 parts of water before the plants are 
sprayed with it. 

By the time this artiole appears the 
plant lice will already have begun 
their miserable work and the gardener 
who begins to spray his plants before 
they get so lousy that he is not able to 
see them is the one who will harvest 
something from his garden. If you 
don’t get the bugs, the bugs will get 
you. 


HEAL ESTATE 


Tills merry party of doughboys about to linvo tho I’uL-iis d© Glace in Puria 
on a “Y” sightseeing tour allows forth one of tho reasons why it Is go- 
Ing to be hard "to koep ’em ilowuon t! e f mi.” 


John T. Burns & Sons, Inc., report 
that they have sold for Annie M. 
Donohue her single frame 8 room 
house situated at No. 497 Ward street, 
Newton Centre. With the house there 

a corner lot of 12,000 feet of land 
anil a garage. Total assessment is 
$8400. Arlene R. Hudson purchases 
for a home. 

John T. Burns & Sons, Inc., also re- 
port that they have sold to Edward K. 
Gibbs the single family ten room 
house situated at No. 257 Lake avenue, 
Newton Highlands. With the house 
there are 12,000 feet of land and the 
total assessment is $6700. Charlotte 

K. Small was the grantor. 

The same concern report that they 
have sold to Charles R. Hendrie the 
property at No. 147 Aspen avenue, Au- 
burndale. With the house, which is 
practically new, there is a double 
garage and 31,000 square feet of land. 
Valuation of the same is $10,500. J. 

L. Greenberg was the gruntor. 

The Burns agency also have sold 
for Wulter H. Coombs his two fam- 
ily house, garage, and three lots of 
land containing 15,000 square feet, 
situated at No. 9 and No. 11 Simpson 
terrace, Newtonville. Catherine Mc- 
Caffrey was the purchaser. The prop- 
erty is assessed for $5500, price paid 
was far in excess of the assessment. 

Tlio sumo concern report that they 
have sold for George B. Voorhees his 
colonial eight room home at No. 9 
Victoria Circle, Newton Centre. With 
the house there ure 6000 square feet 
of land and tho total assessment is 
$6800. Harrison P. Eddy, Jr„ pur- 
chases for u home. 


HEAL ESTATE 

Alvord Bros, announco the sale for 
the Newton Savings Bank of Bul- 
iough’s Park at the junction of Com- 
monwealth avenue, and Bullough’s 
Pond lo the Bonolli-Adums Co. for 
immediate development, consisting of 
294,367 square feet of land, assessed 
for $^4, 600. Tho property lias a 
frontage on Commonwealth avenue of 
about 900 foot, and is in a neighbor- 
hood that is destined to bo one of tho 
groat AoaUlentiul sections of the New- 
tous. 


Auto Delivery Telephones j NeSon^North^ 149* Main Office, Watertown 

THOMAS JOSEPH McCUE 

Construction and 
Motor Trucking Contractor 

WHOLESALE COAL RETAIL 
264 North Beacon St., Watertown, Mass. 


NEWTON FREE LIBRARY 

Recent Verse 


Aldington, Richard. Images — old and 
new. YP-A364 

B<5ok of Yale Review verse. YP-9B6441 
Braith waite, W. S'., ed. Victory! cele- 
brated by thirty-eight American 
poets, with an introduction by Theo- 
dore Roosevelt. YP-9B73 v 

Chapman, J. J. Songs and poems. 

YP-C366 

Cooper, J. F.. Jr. Afterglow. YP-C7& 
Frankau, Gilbert. The other side, and 
other poems. YP-F85 o 

Gautier, Judith. Chinese lyrics from 
the book of jade. YP66-9G23 

Havnes, Williams, comp. Fisherman’s 
verse. YP-9H329 

Hewlett, M. H. The village wife'sla- 
ment. YP-H49 v 

Housman, Laurence. The heart of 
peace. YP-H818 

Kilmer, Aline. Candles that burn. 

YP-K558 

Kilmer, Joyce. Poems, essays and let- 
ters, edited with a memoir by R. C. 
Holliday. 2v. YP-K55 

Kipling, Rudyard. The years between. 

YP-K628 y 

McCrae, John. In Flanders fields, and 
other poems. YP-M13 

McMillin, R. E. Poems. YP-M228 

Middleton, Scudder. The new day. 

YP-M585 

Murdoch, Walter, comp. The Oxford 
book of Australasian verse. YP-9M94 
Morley, Christopher. The rocking 
horse. YP-M82 r 

Neihardt, J. G. The song of three 
friends. YP-N31 so 

Noyes, Alfred. The new morning. 

YP-N87 n 

Osborn. E. B., ed. The muse in arms; 
a collection of war poems, for the 
most part written in the field of ac- 
tion. YP-9081 

Peterson, Arthur. Andvarl’s ring. 

YP-P44 a 

—Collected poems. YP-P44 c 

Rostrevor, George. Escape and fan- 
tasy. * YP-R739 

Stokes, Will. Songs of the services; 
army, navy and marine corps. 

YP-S87 

Van Dyke. Henry. Golden stars, and 
other verses. YP-V28 go 

Welsh, J. C. Songs of a miner. 

YP-W46 

Wilson, E. E.. ed. Comrades of the 
mist, and other rhymes of the grand 
fleet. Poems written by the officers 
and crew of the U. S. S. Arkansas, 
and printed in a weekly paper on 
board the ship. YP-9W689 

Yeats, W. B. The wild swans at Code. 

YP-Y34 w 


WAJJ AJIOUT TO BREAK OUT. «Y” 
INGOING TO START IT. 
‘“WANT TO ENLIST? 

No, this olnt any of that anti-Y. M. 
C, A. bunk. It is to let you know 
that a baseball war is about to begin 
right here in our midst, between the 
War service men of Waltham and 
Newton. Don’t show yourself to be a 
slacker. If you have any “pep” or 
community spirit, enlist at once. The 
nearest Recruiting office is the New- 
ton "Y”. Call around and let Lieut. 
Sterling sign you up with either out- 
fit. 

Practice game every Monday and 
Friday evening at 6.30 sharp. Good 
issue of baseball equipment. 




BUILD YOUR HOME NOW 
AND SAVE MONEY 
DO NOT WAIT until the building boom 
Is on, which Is sure to advance the price 
of labor and materials. Let us show you 
tho actual estimates, and how you can 
I)i|tl4. th|s seven-room colonial house, with 
all Improvements, for J4200. Call and see 
tho plans and see how wo saved tho 
owner |1000 on the cost of this building. 
Plana of buildings of every description. 
HITCHINGS & HITCHINGS, Architects, 
176 Federal SL. Boston, Mass. 


v^Dci n ce 


There’s nothing 
no cooling and. in- 
vigors ting us a 
foaming glass of 


NEWTON 

— The 58th Anniversary Exercises 
and Childreu’s Day will be held at the 
North Church on Sunday evening, June 
8, at 6.30 o’clock. There will be a de- 
mobilizing of the Flag at that time 
by the pastor and Mayor Childs. 


City of Newton 

v. 

Notice Ih Hereby Given 

PUBLIC HEARING 


before the Board of Aldermen at 
CITY HALL, WEST NEWTON 


Oil 


MONDAY, JUNE 16 

at 7.45 I*. >L In regard lo the proposed 
construction by I lie city of an Incin- 
erator near I lie present Cement sited, 
near t lie junction of Neivtonville Ave- 
nue and Lewis Terrace, Newton. 

By order of tho Bourd of Aldermen, 
FRANK M. GRANT, City Clerk. 


'Swett’s 

■ _ ORIGINAL. 

ROOT BEER 

Drawn from the big stono bottle 
at the fount — it’s wholesome, 
refreshing, delicious and satis- 
fying. There’s a vim and vigor 
In every sip — that’s why Its 
been the favorite thirst- x 
quencher for moro than 
60 yuors. 

At Founts and in Bottles Everywhere 


Distributed by 
COCHRANE & 8TIMET8, West Newton 
ii. I*. ATKINS, 300 Centre St. Newton 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 

To the heirs-at-law, next of kin, cred- > 
itors, and all other persons inter- 
ested in the estate of Sarah Emma 
Stanton late of Newton in said 
County, deceased, intestate. 

WHEREAS a petition has been pre- . 
seated to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration on the estato of said 
deceased to Harold B. Stanton of 
Watertown in the County of Middle- 
sex. without giving a surety on his 
bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge, in said County of Middlesex, 
on the thirtieth day of June A.I). 1919, 
at nine o’clock in tho forenoon, to 
show cause if any you have, why the 
sumo should not be granted. 

And the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in * 
tho Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the last publication 
to bo one day, ut least, before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles .1. Hr hit ire, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, tills 
fifth day of Juno in tho year one thou-*v 
sand nine hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

June 1-13-20. 




THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 6, 1919. 


Light Four 
Touring 

$ 1225 



Light Six 
Touring 
$1585 


ABOVE PRIC&B'F.'O. B. . DETROIT 


Big Six Touring , $1985 

R. H. EVANS 

Brook Street, Newton 


Waban 


— Mrs. Ida B. Fowler has purchased 
e H. R. Hunting house on Pine Ridge 
~ad. 

— Mr. Frank L. Miller has Just re- 
red from his position as organist of 
nion Church. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George M. Angier of 
ine Ridge road have opened their 
mmer home at Marion, Mass. 

* — Ladies’ Handicap Singles and 
oys’ Handicap Singles. will be played 
u the grounds of the Neighborhood 
lub during June. 

-A few places still open for the 
ight boys, Norse Camp on the Cape, 
vington, Auburndale, Mass., phone 
ewton West 634M. Advt. 

* — A Bazaar conducted by the ladies 
f the Union Church was held at the 
fub house on Wednesday evening, 
ancing was enjoyed to the music of 
Hurdy Gurdy and strawberries and 
e cream were served. 

— On Wednesday the Ladies’ Circle 
f Union Church gave a bazaar fol- 
‘wed by a supper and entertainment, 
here was ice cream and candy for the 
hildren, hurdy-gurdy and other shows 
hich were exceedingly popular. 

— Next Sunday will he Children’s 
unday at Union Church. There will 
e baptism of infants, recitations and 
inging by the children, presentations 
f' Bibles and diplomas, and a song by 
iss Bates. The pastor will give a 
hort sermon for children. 

— The Sunday School of the Church 
f the Good Shepherd closed last week, 
aving had a season of good average 
ttendance. The following received 
old pins for perfect atendancd, Anne 
pain, John Spain, Mary Tilton, Kath- 
n Tilton, Robert Horn, John Stet- 
on and Charles Martin. 

— The Anniversary Exercises of the 
hurch school will be held at the 
'nion Church Sunday at 11 o’clock, 
hese will include the processional 
nd singing by the school; Scripture 
ecitations and requirements, the con- 
ecration of children in the baptism; 
resentation of Bibles and diplomas; 
warding of "Go To Church” Band j 
adges for current term; sermon for 
he children; a song by Miss, Bates 
nd congregational singing. 


“n&EASON— CLAPP 


On May 29th Miss Emily Blanchard 
lapp, daughter of Mr. adn Mrs. Clift 
ogers Clapp of 49 Temple street, 
est Newton, was married to Mr. 
ollis Tidd Gleason, son of Mr. and 
rs. Edward H. Gleason of 83 Elm 
treet, Jamaica Plain. The wedding 
ty>k place in the Unitarian Church, 
Rev. Julian C. Jaynes officiating, 
he best man was Mr. Francis P. Far- 
uhar of San Francisco, California, 
he maid of honor was Miss Eliza- 
eth B. Clapp, sister of the bride. The 
shers were Mr. James T. Williams 
f Boston, Mr. John A. Paine of West 
Newton, Mr. William M. Rand of Hing- 
hhm, and Mr. Gardner Swan of Hltig- 
am, Mr. Henry Ten Eych Perry of 
Albany, New York, and Mr. John Earl 
Cunningham of Boston. A reception 
at the house followed the wedding. 




CAMBRIDGE 


» CfHTML Sa. THSAr**-' 

Our Wonderful Ventilating System 
makes this theatre the eoolest In 
Oreater Boston. 

DOUGLAS 

FAIRBANKS 


“The Knickerbocker 
Buckaroo” 

To Be Shown for the Entire Week 
Vaudeville to he ('liuniced 
Tliurs., Frl. and Sat. 


NEXT MON., TUKS., WED. 

AC s TS VAUDEVILLE AC 6 TS 


(iEOKGK & I 
NETTIE FOKTO | 


POWERS & 
WALLACE 


HETTY BOND 


SANDY 

sii.vw 


HUGHES 

DUO 


HARRY KOHLERS 

BOSTON’S FAMOUS ORGANIST 

l.ute«t Mark Sennett Comedy 
"NO MOTHER TO GUIDE HIM" 

Big s uiitluy Night Concert 
AUTO PARKING FKKK 

Daily ut 2 and 7.30. Sat. Continuous 
1.30 to 10.30. Tel. (unit.. BOO. Sent* 
ltenerved One Week In Advance, Ex- 
cept Sat. Spec. Mat. Prices, lie A 17o 


Newton Centre 

— Mr. Louis P. Andres has leased the 
house 35 Bowen street. 

— Rev. Edward M. Noyes has just re- 
turned from a trip of several days in 
New York. 

— Mr. J. P. Wescott, Jr., of Newton- 
ville, has purchased the house, 775 
Commonwealth avenue. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Otis S. Phillips of 
Morton street are being congratulated 
on the birth of a daughter. 

— Mr. H. S. Moody of Commonwealth 
avenue has purchased the Alden 
Speare estate on Centre street. 

— Miss Elizabeth Osgood has been 
elected sergeant at arms of the sopho- 
more class at Mt. Holyoke College. 

Box 714 was rung Tuesday afternoon 
for a slight fire in an automobile 
owned by Mr. Wm. Almy of Brookline. 

— The alarm from box 712 Saturday 
evening was for a fire in the preserve 
factory of the Wales estate on Cedar 
street. 

— Mrs. E. P. Young and daughters, 
Dorothy and Barbara of Glenwood ave- 
nue are spending a few weeks at their 
cottage in Wareham, Mass. 

— Mr. George B. Baker of Chestnut 
hill is an incorporator in the Eliot 
Street Garage Co. recently organized 
in Boston with a capital of $1,000,000. 

— The property formerly occupied by 
the late Samuel Ward on Crescent ave- 
nue has been purchased by the Sacred 
Heart Church as a site for a parochial 
school. 

— Your boy will have the best of 
times, come back stronger and bet- 
ter, if he goes to camp — Norse Camp, 
on the Cape. Ovington, Auburndale, 
Mass., phone Newton West 634M. Advt. 

— Three lads from this village won 
five honors each in scholarship at Phil- 
lips Academy at Andover, this last 
half term. They are L. H. Fitch. Jr., 
1920, W. L. Jones, 1919, and W. F. 
Vaughn, 1919. 

— Mr, and Mrs. Frederic H. Butts of 
Gibbs street announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Miss Anita 
Grant Butts, to Alfred J. Craddock of 
Philadelphia, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Alfred Craddock of Newport, Ky. 

— The community picnic for the 
Newton Centre churches will be held 
at the Riverside Recreation grounds 
Saturday afternoon and evening, June 
14. Games and sports are being ar- 
ranged for all ages. Watch this paper 
for further announcements. 

— Miss Priscilla Ordway and the 
Girl Scout Troop number 3 will give 
an entertainment in Jolly’s Hollow on 
June 7th. It will take the form of an 
outdoor masque with Greek dances and 
Fairies. Water Sprites and dances by 
the Ferns and Flowers. The dancing 
Is in charge of Miss Hazel Sands. 

— Next Sunday at the First Church 
will be observed as Children’s Sunday. 
There will be christening of children, 
and exercises by the Primary and 
Juinior Departments. Bibles will be 
given to those graduating from the 
Primary Department, and diplomas to 
those graduating from the Junior De- 
partment. The pastor will speak on 
"The Children’s Crusade.” 

— The Archdeaconry of Lowell met 
at Trinity Church on Thursday for an 
all day session. Several important 
subjects were discussed. Among them 
"What is the matter with our Church 
School?” by the Rev. J. A. Furrer, "A 
greater variety in the Conduct of Serv- 
ices” by Rev. Arthur W. Moulton of 
Grace Church, Lawrence. Other speak- 
ers were Rev. Prescott Ewarts of 
Christ Church, Cambridge, and the 
Rev, W. W. Love the missionary of the 
Diocese. 

— The Union Field day of the New- 
ton Centre Churches will be held Sat- 
urday, June 14th, at the Riverside 
Recreation Grounds. Special cars will 
be attached to the train leaving New- 
ton Centre at 12.46, and returning, to 
the train leaving Riverside at 7.41. 
Tickets must he bought at the Newton 
Centre Dairy Lunch on Monday or 
Tuesday, June 9 and 10th. Land and 
water sports, contests, and a tennis 
tournament have been arranged, and 
a good time is promised for everybody 
who attends. 



WEDDING GIFTS 
In 

Sterling SUrer 
Beautiful New Goods 
Lowest Prices 

""Ml SUMMER ST. BOSTON 


DARIUS COBB'S MASTERPIECE 

THE MASTER 

9x12 Sepia Reproduction 
55 Cent* Postpaid 

THE PILCRIM PRESS 

14 BEACON ST., B08T0N 


Awnings, Tents, Canopies, Wagon 
Covers, Canvas Goods 

Of Every Description 

FLAGS AND FLAG POLES 

Tents and Canopies to Rent 
For Weddings and Receptions 

L. NICKERSON, 173 State St., Boston 

Established 1875 Telephone Richmond 986 


Newtonville 

Miss Webb has sffid her house on 
Fair Oaks avenue to Mr. CbAs. C. 
Bnlcom. 

—Miss Veronica RArry, RadclifTe ’22, 
has beon elected captain of her class 
basket hall team. 

— Mr. J. S. Olcott of Austin street 
has purchased, for his own occupancy, 
the house 16 Austin street. 

— Congratulations are being given 
Mr! and Mrs. C. B. Whitney on the 
birth of a son on Wednesday. 

—Mrs. J. Ellis Gammons of Brook- 
side avenue has Just returned from a 
trip to the White Mountains. 

— Waltqr Gifford, has returned from 
a week’s fishing trip at Grand Lake 
Stream, Washington County, Maine. 

—Mr. J. P. Westcott, Jr., of Wash- 
ington park ha spurchased the house 
776 Commonwealth avenue, Newton 
Centre. 

— Miss Claire McGUnchee of Elm 
road, Radcliffe, 21, has been elected 
secretary of the Music Club of that 
college. 

— Mrs. George Gould of Washington 
street, formerly Alice Wing, is recov- 
ering from an operation at the New- 
ton Hospital. 

— Mr. and Mrs. C. Haverland Morse 
and daughter of Brookside avenue 
have returned from a visit to Lake 
Winnipesaukee. 

— Mr. C.. R. King has sold his house 
on Broadway to Mr. John Lancaster 
and moved to 985 Boylston street, 
Newton Highlands. 

— Mr. William A. Rose of Gay street 
has taken an apartment at The Col- 
onna, and Mr. Edward S. Gilmore of 
Park place has taken the house he has 
Just vacated. 

— On Thursday evening Miss Ruth 
Howell, daughter of Mrs. Charles M. 
Howell was quietly married to Mr. 
Joseph Hallett, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Nelson Hallett. 

— St. John’s Church will not be 
closed during the summer. Services 
in charge of the Lay Reader, Mr. Nich- 
olson, will be held in August during 
the Rector’s absence. 

— The Gethsemane Commandery of 
the Masonic Lodge held a Mardi Gras 
on Thursday at Temple Hall. Dinner 
was served at 6.30 followed by an en- 
tertainment and dance. 

— On Saturday afternoon, two auto- 
mobiles collided while on Crafts street, 
near Albemarle road and J. F. Dooley 
of Roxbury, was arrested and later m 
court fined $76. He appealed. 

— Mr. Joseph E. Butler of Austin 
street was overcome by the heat on 
Tuesday afternoon, while riding on a 
street car In West Newton and was 
taken to the Newton Hospital. 

— Perfect contentment for the boy, 
assurance of safety and right guid- 
ance to the mother, at Norse Camp, 
on the Cape. Ovington, Auburndale, 
Mass., phone Newton West 634M. Advt. 

— On June 19th there will be an in- 
formal reception to the boys who have 
returned from service in the Univer- 
salist Church. There will be a spe- 
cial musical program, speaking and 
dancing. 

—The automobile of Mr. W. T. Glid- 
den' of Newtonville avenue, while 
standing In front of the residence of 
Dr. E. E. Hopkins on the same street, 
on Monday afternoon, was stolen by 
three young men. It was later recov- 
ered in Cambridge. 

— Mrs. William B. Arnold has been 
made Chairman of a Committee for a 
sale to be held in the Fall for the Par- 
ish House fund of St. John’s church. 
Every woman in the parish is Urged 
to co-operate, and to meet at Mrs. Ar- 
nold’s on Monday afternoon, June 9th. 
Porch parties have been suggested for 
summer work. 

— The Annual Meeting of the "Q. M.” 
Club of St. John’s Church was held 
Sunday evening. The constitution 
Recently drawn up was ratified, aud 
the following officers were elected: 
President, Robert Irwin; Vice-Presi- 
dents, Betty Arnold, Jean Hayden R. 
T. Loring, Jr.; Secretary and Treas- 
urer, Adele Hatch. 

— A minister, mindful of the ups 
and downs of church attendance, once 
wrote, "It is true that a good many 
do have conscientious scruples against 
church going when golf, gardening and 
.motoring season is on. The Rector is 
not unreasonable. But he would not 
have you neglect church for three solid 
months. In June go as much as you 
can. Go once in July. And in August 
once.” 

— The Annual Meeting of the Wo- 
man’s Guild of St. John’s Church was 
held at the home of Mrs. Harlan H. 
Ballard, Jr., on Tuesday. May 27th. 
After a delicious supper the business 
meeting took place and the following 
officers were elected for the coming 
year: President, Mrs. Harlan H. Bal- 
lard. Jr.; Vice-President, Mrs. Charles 
F. Alexander; Secretary, Mrs. Gilbert 
L. Valentine; Treasurer, Mrs. Karl W. 
Reece. The Guild has had a most suc- 
cessful year with $179.04 balance in 
the treasury. $125 has been given for 
the Parish House Fund. 

— On Wednesday evening in the par- 
lor of the Central Church, the pupils of 
the Misses Cotton gave a pianoforte 
Recital, which brought out a fairly 
large audience despite the intense heat, 
and an interesting and well-balanced 
program wus presented. There were 
a number of very little •children among 
the performers and one was struck at 
once with the confidence and precision 
which they brought to their playing. 
Even though the little fingers might 
not always he perfectly under control 
the musical idea was evidently clear 
in the young minds, notwithstanding 
the heat and the natural sleepiness 
induced by late hourB. The advanced 
pupils charmed the uudience with the 
brilliance and ease and grace of their 
playing, which was really remarkuble. 
Mr. Thomas W. Cotton, baritone, gave 
one selection, and the program was 
further varied by a reading. “In the 
Buys of Lafayette” given by Miss Caro- 
lyn McClellan to incidental musical 
accompaniment. Among those taking 
part were Marjorie Nichols, Martha 
Willson, Crawford Livingston. Esther 
Colemun, Stanley Soustor, Arline Fow 
ler. Bruce Fowler, Richard Cooper, 
Mary Colemun, Carolyn McClellan. 
Elizabeth Edwards. Bernardine and 
Virginia Brooks, Samuel Moore, Cath- 
erine Hodges, Stanley Kimlmll, Isa 
hello Souster, Katherine Cooper and 
Virginia McClellan 

Daily Thought. 

lie hath no power thut hath not 
power to use. — llalley. 


HOSE PLANTS and PANSY PLANTS 
at 

NEWTON H0*R C^llRBVATORIHS 

R. C. Bridgham, Prop. 

329 Newtonville Avrnoo 
Newtonville 

Telephone Newton North 404 


West Newton 

—Mrs. E. W. Pride of Temple street 
is entertaining her cousin from Kan- 
sas. 

— Mrs. H. M. WheelocK of Highland 
street la visiting her sister In New 
York City . 

— Mrs. May L. Sweatt has purchased 
the double house ac 1591-93 Washing- 
ton street. 

— Mr. H. M. Warren of Fountain 
street has opened his residence at Al- 
lerton, Mass. 

— Miss H. E. Hallett of Highland 
street from returned from school at 
Norton, Mass. 

— Mr. W. M. Bullivant of Mt. Vernon 
street has opened his summer home 
at Marion, Mass. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Ralph A. Barry of 
Warwick road are being congratulated 
on the birth of a son. 

— Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Crimmins of 
Dartmouth street entertained friends 
at dinner on Tuesday evening. 

— Miss Winifred Whittlesey, Rad- 
cliffe, ’21. has been elected manager of 
the Mandolin Club of that college. 

—Mr. Chester O. Dorchester of Win- 
throp street was elected treasurer of 
the Boston Methodist Social Union this 
week. 

—There was a still alarm early Sun- 
day morning for a small fire in some 
rubbish on the place of Mrs. Elizabeth 
Brace on Highland avenue. 

-Next Sunday is Children’s Day 
Festival Sunday at the Second Church, 
the combined choirs of the church, the 
primary school and the orchestra will 
take part in the morning service. 

—Rev. J. Edgar Park of Winthrop 
street gave the memorial address last 
Sunday evening at Milton Academy 
for the alumni of the school who had 
fallen in the war. 

— Mr. R. B. Henderson of Water- 
town. Mass., who recently purchased 
the Alley estate on Chestnut street 
has resold to Mr. C. W. Boynton, who 
will occupy in the fall. 

— Norse Camp under expert guid- 
ance, limited to twelve boys. A big, 
wholesome, outdoor, summer. For 
your boy? Ovington, Auburndale, 
Mass., phone Newton West 634M. Advt. 

—The Unitarian Church held its an- 
nual Flower Service last Sunday, and 
the following named children were 
christened:— Sally Barnard, Nancy 
Virginia Carter, Bertha Ogden. Ed- 
mund Whitehead Ogden, Jr., William 
Mason Wise, Jr. 

— The following will return to West 
Newton from Vassar College this 
week: Miss Elizabeth Carter. Miss Dor- 
othy Hallett, Miss Marjorie Hartwell, 
and Miss. Marjorie Howlanrf. Miss 
Mabelle Bartholomew will graduate 
from Vassar College nexjt week. 

— Children’s Day will be observed by 
the Sunday-School of. the Lincoln Park 
Baptist Church next Stmday with a 
concert at 10.45 A. M h Miss Craigan 
of Newton Centre, a ' specialist in 
story-telling will give a nuhiber of 
stories. There will be no service in 
the evening. 

—The wedding of Miss Helen Har- 
gedon, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Hargedon of Derby street and Dr. 
William T. Coggar of Belmont, took 
place Wednesday morning at St. Ber- 
nard’s Church, Rev. J. F. Keleher offi- 
ciating. Dr. and Mrs. Coggar will 
make their home in Belmont. 

— At the annual \fenrrorial Day 
Work Horse parade in Boston last 
week, several ribbons were won by the 
C. F . Eddy Co. In the veteran driver 
class, there were three employees of 
this Company, James Fox, with serv- 
ice of 22 years, and Thomas Clark and 
James Spikes with 31 years each. 

—On Saturday. May 31, under the 
auspices of the Women’s Alliance of 
the Unitarian Church, an all day pic- 
nic was given to 370 Syrian children 
in the Middlesex Fells. The children 
started at 10 A. M. from the Barnard 
Memorial, Boston, in five special cars. 
Rev. Julius F. Krolflfer, whose address 
on Americanization at the Alliance 
Annual Luncheon on April 29 inspired 
the excursion, assisted in its manage- 
ment. With Reservation “animals” to 
visit, relay games, etc., the day was 
a happy occasion for the children and 
the assistants. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Thomas O. Marvin 
of Brookline, have issued invitations 
to the wedding of their daughter, Mar- 
jorie Marvin, to Ensign Justin Down 
ing Hartford, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. 
W. Hartford of Portsmouth, N. H., 
who graduates this week from the 
Naval Academy at Annapolis. The 
ceremony will he performed in the 
picturesque Little Harbor Chapel 
Portsmouth, and the reception will 
held at the summer residence of the 
bride’s parents. Wild Rose Lane, New 
Castle. The marriage service will be 
performed by Rev. Judson P. Marvin 
of Annisquam and Rev. Reignold K. 
Marvin of Franklin, uncles of the 
bride. Miss Marion Marvin will be 
maid of honor, and Miss Janet Mitch- 
ell, Smith College. ’19, of East Orange, 
N. J., and Miss Dorothy Marvin of 
Camden, S. C., will be bridesmaids. 
The best man will be Lieut. Charles 
M. Dale of the Coast Artillery, and the 
ushers will he classmates of Mt. Hart- 
ford at the Naval Academy. 

ANNUAL MEETING 


Newton Highlands 

— Mr. Aflllhe Ward has reopened iff* 
residence on Carver road. 

—Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Litchner of 
Rockledge are in Maine. 

—Mr. Ralph Walsh of Fldral street 
has returned from Virginia. 

—Mr. C. R. King of Newtonville has 
taken the house 985 Boylston atreet. 

—Mr. William J. Cozens has pur- 
chased the house 48 Dickertnan road. 

— Mr. Louis 8. Brigham of Randolph, 
Vermont, has been visiting here this 

— Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Bean left this 
week for a trip to Rangeley flakes, 
Maine. 

— Mrs. C. H. Beach of Floral street 
has been, visiting relatives in Cam- 
bridge. 

—Mr. M. S. Pennell of Centre street 
has been In Philadelphia this week on 
a business trip. 

— Mrs. S. L. Eaton entertains the 
Travel Class of West Newton at her 
home here today. 

—A Children’s Day Concert will be 
given at the Methodist Church Sunday 
evening. June 15th. 

— A special meeting of the Women 
Associates of Newton Highlands was 
held Tuesday morning. 

— Mr. Frank A. Burdick of Lake 
avenue has been in New York on a 
business trip this week. 

— There was a very successful en- 
tertainment held at St. Paul’s Parish 
House on Tuesday evening. 

— The young daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Sawyer of Flor.il street, 
who has been ill. has recovered. 

— Mrs. C. C. Small has sold her resi- 
dence on Floral street, consisting of a 
house and garage, to Mr. Harris, who 
buys for occupancy. 

— The Ladies’ Aid Society of the 
Methodist Church will hojd a lawn 
party and supper on the church lawn 
on the evening of June 19th. 

— Rev. and Mrs. G. G. Phipps have 
returned from Wellesley, where he 
had part in the exercises at the dedi- 
cation there of the new Congregational 
Church. 

—Do you want your boy to broaden, 
mentally and physically? Send him 
to camp — Norse Camp, on the Cape. 
Ovington, Auburndale, Mass., phone 
Newton West 634M. Advt. 

—Mr. Warren F. Spaulding of Bos- 
ton spoke at the Methodist Church 
last Sunday evening, his subject be- 
ing, "The New View of the Bad Boy." 
Mr. Spaulding .is secretary or the 
Mass. Prison Association. 

— While Mr, Ernest Laubner of Ded- 
ham street was {standing in front of 
his automobile in the square. Sat- 
urday evening, another machine back- 
ed into him, inflicting some injury and 
drove away without inquiry. 

. — The preacher next Sunday at the 
Congregational Church will be Rev. 
Stoddard Lane of Bogota, N. J.. Ser- 
geant in the Section Sanitaire. S. S. V. 
539. American Ambulance Service. Am- 
herst Unit. Awarded Croix de Guerre. 
Children’s Day will be observed at the 
morning service. Diplomas will be 
given to church school pupils gradu- 
ating from the several departments, 
and plants will be given to beginners, 
atid Primary Departments. 


CENTRAL SQUARE THEATRE 


Douglas Fairbanks has a suitcase 
full of brand new stunts that he in- 
troduces in his next picture "The 
Knickerbocker Buckaroo,” which is to 
be shown at Gordon’s Cambridge Cen- 
tral Square Theatre, all next week. 

His latest Artcraft release takes 
him out West, where in an effort to 
be unselfish and do things for other 
people, he gets into melodramatic 
mix-qps that create their own comedy 
incidents. 

In addition to this wonderful photo- 
play there will be a fine bill of vaude^ 
ville. including: Betty Bond, charac- 
ter songs in her own beautiful stage 
setting; George and Nettie Forto in a 
variety of comedy, singing and danc- 
ing; Powers and Wallace, a very clev- 
er pair in a sketch entitled "Georgia 
on Broadway”, also Sandy Shaw, and 
Hughes Duo. 

The latest Mack Sennett Comedy 
"No Mother to Guide Him” will also 
be shown. 

There will be an entire change of 
vaudeville Thursday. Friday and Sat- 
urday. • 


LOST and FOUND 


LOST— In or near Church of Our 
Lady. Adams street, a bag containing 
a $50 1st Liberty Loan Bond, and a 
small sum of money. Return to Mary 
E. Murphy. 91 Crafts street. 



Deposits Draw Interest 
From July 10th 


SPECIAL PRICE REDUCTIONS 

ON 

Ladies' and Gent’s Custom Work 


*80 Salt, Now *40 
*00 Salt, Now *30 
*73 Sait, Now *03 

Perfect Fit, Stylish 
Cut and Hand 
Tailoring 

Every Stitch 
Guaranteed 

Contract Pressing 
First Claw Cleansing 
and Dyeing 

\V© would be pleased 
to call on you with 
samples. 

HIGHLANDS 

CLEANSING 

SHOP 

II. Krlkorlan 
Proprietor 

1157 Walnut St. 
Newton Highlands 

Trt. New. So. SS3-M 



TiaSdWVD H 

CARPENTER and CABINET MAKER 
Telephone 215# Newton North 
Jobbing Promptly Attended To 
Residence: 

11 Roumere Rd., NewtonrilU 

Telephone 2844-W Newton North 


LostSavjngs Bank Books 

Saving* Bank Books a* llstsd fcslsw 
ar* lost and appUoatlon has been osnds 
for payments of the accounts In accord- 
ance with Sec. 40. Chap. 590. of th# Acts 
of 1908 and amendments. 

Newfbn Savings Bank Book. No. 44.961 
Newton Saving* Bank Book. No. 45.9So 
Newton Savings Hunk Book No. 45634. 
Newton Savings Bank Book No. 16175 


WOODLAND 

PARK 

A Boarding School for Girls and 
a Country Day School for Girls, 
and for Boys under ten. 

The Junior Department of Lasell 
Seminary 

Located in attractive and com- 
fortable building formerly known 
as the Woodland Park HoteL 
Kindergarten, Primary and 
Grammar Grades 
Conversational French, Music 
with supervised practice. Drawing, 
Sewing. Folk and Social Dancing 
and Deportment, Swimming and 
Riding; Individual attention. An 
abundance of good wholesome 
’ood, fresh air, exercise and sleep. 
Visitors Always Welcome 
Come and see the school and 
talk over the problem. For cata- 
log address 

GUY M. WINSLOW, 
Auburndale, Mas*. 

Phone 

Newton WVst 630 


MISCELLANEOUS 


J. E. BLANCHARD, Furniture and 

Piano Moving, General Trucking. 72 Vfc 
Elmwood St.. Newton. Tel. N. N. 
1198-M. N. N. 593-W. 


WANTED 


TO LET 


TO LET — In Newtonville. 1 large 
furnished room in private family for 
business men only. Tel. Newton No. 
1385. 


WANTED — In Newton, by 3 adults, 
5 or 6 heated, unfurnished rooms La 
two-apartment. or two-family house. 
Must be m good neighborhood and 
convenient to cars. Address “D”, 
j Graphic Office. 

WANTED — Woman to take home 
‘ family washing for two adults, white 
preferred. Apply Mrs. R. T. Stanley, 
111 Pleasant street, Newton Centre. 


TO LET — Two pleasant furnished 
rooms, convenient to trains and elec- 
trics. Apply 19 Austin street, New- 
tonville. 


FOR KENT — In Newtonville. after 
Sept. 1st. room in private family. Tel. 
Newton North 912-R. 


- WANTED — A neat girl, 16 or 17. as 
mother’s helper to assist in light 
house-work and the care of two chil- 
dren. Can go home nights. Tel. New- 
ton North 2646-W. 

WANTED— A High School boy to cut 
grass at 27 George street, Newton. 
Must bring mower. 


The annual meeting of the Newton- 
ville Improvement Association was 
held lust evening In Dennison hall, 
Newtonville, with a good attendance 
considering the heat. 

The following officers were re-elect- 
ed, president, John Daboll; vice-presi- 
dents, Albert M. Lyon, Rev. Richard 
T. Loring and Edwin E. Woodbury; 
secretary-treusurer, Harry D. Cabot. 

Mr. William C. Adams of the Fish 
and Game Commission of the State 
gave a most interesting und instruct- 
ive illustrated lecture on Fish and 
Games Birds and this was followed 
by a musical entertainment and re- 
freshments. 


LOST — On May 29. an Antique 
Cameo Pin. Possibly near Newton- 
ville Postotfice or Technical High 
School Building. Reward. Finder 
please return to office of School De- 
partment. 


LOST — Tuesday. June 3, a crocheted 
hag. between Elmwood street and 
Newton square. Reward if returned 
to Telephone Office, Elmwood street, 
Newton. 


FOR SALE 


FOR SALE— Magee range, good as 
pew. $50.00. Golden Oak dining table. 
6 chairs, $50.00. Iron bed. springs, 
mattress. $10.00. Tel. N. W. 711-R. 


TO RENT — In Waban. space in a 
new private garage. Telephone New- 
ton South 1439-M. 


GARAGE TO LET — $4.00 a month. 
Apply 37 Hunt street. Tel. N. N. 904-R. 


TO LET — A tenement of four rooms 
and bath, all improvements. Apply 
21 Thornton St.. Newton. 


TO LET — Garage for automobile or 
for storage, at 37S Cherry street. West 
Newton. 


WANTED — Women with experience 
as Dressmakers. Drapers or Finish- 
ers. Can work five days a week if 
desired. Miss Fish, 140 Boylston St.. 
Boston. 


SITUATION WANTED — Young man 
having chauffeur's license and wide ex- 
perience. is at liberty evenings, Sat- 
urday afternoons and Sundays. For 
further particulars address E. O. A.. 
12 Kimball terrace. Newtonville. Mass, 
or Phone Newton North 1953-W. 


» \NTED — Strong boy. 16 years or 
over. Garden City Laundry. 75 Ad- 
ams St.. Newton. 


FOR SALE A Jewell, four burner 
gas range, in good condition. Can be 
seen at 419 Centre street, or telephone 
Newton North 1771. 


FOR SALE— Refrigerator. Capacity 
100 pounds, new in November. Price 
$30. Tel. Newton South 668-M. 


FOR RENT— Two pleasant rooms WOMEN AND GIRLS W ANTED — • 
suitable for gentleman alone or light High wages, steady positions. Gar- 
housekeeping. 39 Wesley street, den City Laundry, 75 Adams St.. Xew- 
Newton. j ton. 

WANTED — Boarding homes for 
babies, within fifteen miles of Boston, 
where intelligent care will be given. 
Good locality and good sanitary con- 
ditions required. Address Miss Mary 
S. Doran, Boston Children’s Aid So- 
ciety, 43 Hawkins street, Boston. 


TO LET — Ou Cabot street, Newton- 
ville. A high class single house, 11 
rooms, 2 bath rooms, quartered oak 
floors, electric lights, etc. $75 per 
month, ready July first. I will also; 
have a uice 10-room single house on 
I Harvard street, $50 per month for ! 
August first. Also several single and 
two-family houses ;md choice building 
lots for sale. D. P. O’Sullivan, Real 
Estate and Insurance, 2S6 Cabot St., ! 
Newtonville. 


White-Light Producer. 

By substituting other metals for 
mercury In a vapor electric lump 
u European scientist produces a pure 
white light. 


FOR SALE — An Oak Dining-room 
table in good condition. Inquire ut 
261 Centro Street, Newton. 

i ok SALE \ and 

ice chest at a bargain. Appl> :i till 
belt Btri 
Newton West. 

FOR SALE Mowing machine for 
one horse. Mann’s Bone-Cutting Ma- 
chine for poultry. Two refrigerator’s; 
one large, the other extra large. Meat 
cutter’s bench. Telephone Newton 
West 49- M. 

I OR SALE v l V RARti UN -Large 
wing chair, cretonne covered. Apply 
I at 63 Elm road, Newtouville. Tel. 
iNewtou North 1907-M. 


For Summer Rental 

| 

Bungalow of 7 rooms, house and 
I grounds in excellent condition, mod- 

I ern conveniences of every description, j 
Cool, quiet, exclusive neighborhood, I 
Price $240 for 3 mouths, which in- j 
I eludes care of lawn, water, gas. tele- \ 
phone, und electricity. Tel. Fort Hill 
3207. 


llarwicliport Cottage 

For Kent I' mil July - 1 


no telephone;. 


rs^uirtKi in j# ur hams to oniar 
..ur pinna tunaU by Ft ink A. U«M 
rattra* Ut call. th*r* t na coat ta ion 


A YOUNG GIRL would like position 
iu American family that is going 
away for the summer, beach or moun- 
tains, to care for children, 5 years’ 
experience. Tel. Newton South 104-M. 

WANTED— Si 

rooms, modern, or would like small 
house iu good location, June or July 
1st. Address R., Graphic Office, 


GIRLS WANTED 

For Light Factory Work 
NEW ENGLAND MICA CO. 

66 Woerd Av., Waltham 



I 


sugar- tilled wafer* which they sup- 
ported. 

There wa* no question about the 
r uuplcte success of Nettle’s discov- 
ery, ns the fragrance of the fresh 
•ups of ten which she served ndded 
the inviting repast. 

ivorite nt the ten hour— 
s them nlmost ns much 
it breakfast and — >8 the 

S’. B. C. Grahfl 
Indlsnensa 


The reliance that womenhlmi has 
learned to put in crackers Is i»eing 
well Illustrated nt the tens being 
given for returning soldiers 
sailors. 

Every woman in the metropoli 
tins In her pantry n generous ^up| 
ply of the National U 
pany’s always useful 
•ally accepted products. 

Nettie, a comely young wonMi 
yeoman of 
form, foum 

entertaining a compnny nt ton at 
uptown home the other nfti ^ 

Including several you;.g ofll 
a battleship in port^ 

She had Fig 
every soldi 
vated a m, 

msco aj^^ 1 nat 

DmJr Children 
should have 
robust appe- 
tites is natural and proper. It is a sign 
they are strong, well and growing. 
Encourage them — give them N.B.C. 
Graham Crackers — even be- 
tween meals. 


ioil 
ser 
now 
again, 
venled, iT! 

On a thicl 
edged with sn!J 
mona and Lotus bisonl 
Some bruised 1< ;vcs lay nt the 
tom of the basket, and the petals 
emitted a delicate frnsrnnce. adding 
charm to the delightfully favored. 


NATIONAL BISCUIT 
COMPANY 


lam 
Tast — 
se for 
es a more 
than bnr- 
^ I know a man 
from France recently, 
who had found it very difficult 
to procure bread flint was cither 
palatable or digestible. Tie bad re- 
course to N. R O. Graham Trackers. 



I.Tl 


NONE 

BETTER AT ANY PRICE 


5VARIETIES PACKED IN /A 8c/2 LB.CANS 
SOLD BY GROCERS EVERYWHERE. 


BOSTON DW1NELL-WRIGHT CO. CHICAGO 


Telephone, Beach 7573 W. G. Weeber,. Mgr. 

LINCOLN CARE COMPANY 

HOUSE CLEANING 

Cleaning, Painting, Kalsomining, Window Washing, 
Renovation of Rugs and Carpets 
In fact all work incidental to proper care of any estate 
119 LINCOLN STREET, - - - BOSTON, MASS. 


BICYCLES 

We carry all the leading 
makes 

Peerless $32.50 

Emblem 37.00 

Pope 36.00 

It will pay you to investigate 

Newton Cycle Co. 

332 CENTRE STREET 
NEWTON 

We Do All Kinds of Repairing 
Locksmith and Trunk 
Repairing 

We carry a full line of tricycles 
and velocipedes. 


EDITH A. CUSHING 

CUSTOM CORSETS TO OROER 

Altered or Repaired 
110 T RE MONT ST„ BOSTON 
Telephone Fort Hill 2149 


Tel a Back Bay 53628. 75877 
Hours 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. Dally 
Saturday 9 A. M. to 1 P. M. 

Boston Employment Agency 

Licensed 

Established 29 Tears 
MRS. H. G. PRESTON. Manager 

SUPERIOR HOUSEHOLD. HOTEL and 
INSTITUTION HELP OF ALL KINDS 
*74 BOYLSTON STREET. BOSTON, MASS. 


A. Yanro, Pres. A. J. Fetch, Treat*. 

A. B. FOTCH, Inc. 

Cold Storage For Furs 

Repairing, Remodeling, Custom Work 
A Specialty at KeoMonuhle Prices 

8 WINTER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
TeL Beach 1037-M Established 1888 


FLAG POLE 

Derrick, Spur, Tent, Pike and 
Bean Poles, C&dur Posts. 

Also Spruce and Oregon Spars, 
all lengths 

BOSTON FLAG POLE CO. 

169 Broadway Extension 
South Boston TeL S«w Boston 112 


CITY HALL 


The Civic Club of Xewton will hold 
an informal meeting next Tuesday 
evening at the Xewton Club to discuss 
the subject Qf a proper Memorial to 
be erected in this city. Messrs. Henry 
J. Carlson and Everett E. Kent will 
speak. 



WHEEL CHAIRS 


The Largest Selection in New England 

SICK ROOM REQUISITES 

of Every Description 

F. H. THOMAS CO. 

689-691 Boylston Street, Boston 

Tel. Back Bay 1196 


VERI-BRITE 

The Polish Everybody Is Using 
Once Used Always Used 
Trial Bottle Hoc 

Your Xearest Dealer 
or 

THE LINWOOD CO. 

46 Cornhlll, Boston 


74 SADDLE 

and family horseB, including two pairs, 
chestnuts and bays; one handsome 
pony and fine outfit for children. 

J. I). PACKARD & SONS CO., 

29 Brighton Ave^ Allston 

BRUCE R. WARE. B. c/sT~ 

1M CHURCH HT„ NEWTON, if AMO. 
BOSTON OFFICE : No. 6 BEACON STREET 

Telephone Ileymarket IU8 

Public Accountant 

Book* Opened. Closed and Adjusted 
Auditing of Corporation and Mercantile 
Accounts A Hasdai tr 



Nobody but yourself knows 
you a re wearing bifoeuls wtu-u 
you wear KUVPTOK*. 


A Convenient Service 

We keep a complete and permanent record 
of the eyesight requirements of our putrons. 

If you break your lenaes, simply telephone 
or drop us a card and new lenses will be made 
for you at once. 

HOMER’S OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

WM. S. SCHAFFER. Reg. Optometrist 
Furmerly with Andrew J. Lloyd Co. 

45 WINTER ST., BOSTON 
One minute from Park end Cambridge Subways 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 6, 1919. 


WOMEN’S CLUBS 


Grack M. Bubt, Editor. 


BACK FROM ASHEVILLE 


Unbounded hospitality on the part 
of the Xorth Carolina women, the 
beautiful natural setting of Asheville 
and the enthusiastic interest of the 
visiting club women to the number 
of 7 -f» combined to make the .Mid- 
biennial Council meeting of the Gen- 
eral Federation of Women's Clubs a 
most successful gathering. Viewing 
it in retrospect it was not a 
great meeting, so far as addresses nnd 
speakers were concerned, and there 
are points where Massachusetts was 
inclined to think it could have im- 
proved upon things, though that is 
not intended as a reflection, yet it 
brought together women from 44 
states nnd London. Eng. Massachu- 
setts led with 23, excepting, of 
course, Xorth Carolina which had 394. 

The press of Asheville were most 
generous in the space accorded the 
convention and there was a feeling of 
pride in the hearts of the delegates to 
read that they “were among the flower 
of American womanhood.” 

Assembly singing was a feature of 
every session and the big chorus of 
school children on the first evening 
in patriotic songs and that of colored 
children the next, when they delight- 
ed their audience with “Spirituals,” 
will be remembered even after many 
other details of the program have 
passed from mind. 

Americanization, Child Welfare, 
War Memorials. Reconstruction with 
all the attending problems were 
the serious problems discussed — dis- 
cussed from many angles and by 
many eminent speakers. 

Miss Susanna Cocroft spoke for the 
promotion of health of women, par- 
ticularly those in industry, through 
training camps where they may 
have outdoor training similar to that 
the soldiers have had. She told of 
the effort to get the use of some of 
tht government camps for the pur- 
pose. 

Miss Helen Varick Boswell present- 
ed in a stirring address “Woman’s 
Part in Americanization.” the three 
essentials being the knowledge of a 
common language with a minimum 
of illiteracy, a common citizenship, 
and the getting together of all the 
things that are really American. 

A definition of this term "American- 
ization” as “a preparation of the hearts 
of the native born to receive into full 
fellowship those born in other lands” 
summed up the address of Fred C. 
Butler, director of Americanization of 
the Department of the Interior. 

Thursday and Friday were given to 
the departments of work and to the 
consideration of Federation policies. 
Every effort during the past year has 
been bent toward shaping their work 
along reconstruction lines. A new 
view of Home Economics that of the 
“Children in the Homes” rather than 
food, budget, etc., which have been 
uppermost, was presented by Mrs. 
Charles W. Greene. Her remarks on 
the matter of amusements, dress and 
the like, were most refreshing and 
opened up a field that the club will do 
well to follow. 

The closing session was given to 
the so-called cultural departments, 
art, muBic, and literature and these, 
too. had the “war squint.” 

Of the several events may be men- 
tioned the reception the first evening 
tendered by the Chamber of Com- 
merce, the auto trip to Baltimore by 
the Rotary Club through miles and 
miles of woods with laurel in full 
bloom, honeysuckle and roses run- 
ning wild along the road sides — a 
visit to the rose garden and to the 
dairy where herds of fine Jersey 
cows were being milked by electricity 
with a sample of the milk and ice 
cream for every delegate. 

As the abundant spring rains had 
prevented the putting in order of the 
Mt. Mitchell railway, an auto trip to 
Mt. Piszah was substituted for those 
who remained over for Saturday. 

The Rose Tea at the Country Club 
was true to its name for everywhere 
were roses until the artistic club- 
house was converted into a veritable 
bower and even the ices were pink 
roses imported, we were told, from 
Washington. 

Without doubt the address of 
Thursday evening by Judge William 
H. Wadham of Xew York was the 
high water mark of the Convention. 
While his subject was announced as 
“The League of Xations," it was in 
reality side-lights upon the Peace Con- 
ference at Paris from an eye witness. 

An organ recital on Friday evening 
was tendored the delegates by the 
management of the Grove Park Inn, 
the headquarters of the Convention — 
beautiful music, beautifully rendered, 
and an inspiring and uplifting ending 
to the series of meetings. 

WELCOMED HOME 


First Class Private J. E. Corcoran, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Cor- 
coran of 40 Moulton street Xewton 
Lower Falls, who served with Bat- 
tery B. 101st Field Artillery in all its 
activities ut the front in France, waB 
a member of the Xewton Fire Depart- 
ment at the time he enlisted at Box- 
ford. August 22, 1917. 

His popularity in the service and at 
home were amply attested to by a 
welcome-home party tendered him at 
his parents’ home at which were pres- 
ent two other brothers, Ensign Henry 
J. Corcoran, who saw service on the 
U. S. S. Cohasset, and is now going to 
Xewport News, and Daniel J. Cor- 
coran, Jr., who was an S. A. T. C. man 
when the signing of the armistice cut 
short his intended army caroer. 

Private Corcoran was presented a 
gold watch by his uncle, C. Frank 
Dalton of Xeponset. 

The Jordan Trio, consisting of 
Miss Gertrude Jordan, pianist; Miss 
Evelyn Jordan, violinist, and William 
Iordan, ,banJol I and Tibaldi, a New- 
ton pianist gave selections. 


BRAE BURN 


Robert IT. Bidwell and Woodbury 
Rund ure the new State doubles ten- 
nis champions. They defeated R. C. 
Heaver and JoHhun Wheelwright .in a 
tlvo-act match, which required 3 1-2 
hours to play, in the final round of the 
championship tournament on Tues- 
day afternoon. The scores wore 6—4, 
6—7, 6—3, 9—11, 6—3. 


EDDY— POST 


On Wednesday evening Miss Grace 
Brewster Post, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. David J. Post of 405 Washington 
street, Hartford, Conn., was married 
to Mr. Randolph Locke Eddy, a Dart- 
mouth graduate, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Harrison P. Eddy of Xewton Centre, 
Mass., formerly of Worcester, Mass.. 
The ceremony was performed by the 
Rev. Dr. Edwin Pond Parker, Pastor 
Emeritus of the South Congregational 
Church. Hartford. Conn., assisted by 
Rev. Warren S. Archibald, pastor. The 
bride was given nwny by her father. 

The bride, who formerly at- 
tended Miss C. E. Mason’s School, The 
Castle, at Tarrytown, X. Y., wore a 
“Jenny” gown, and carried a shower 
bouquet of orchids and sweet pens. The 
maid of honor wns .Miss Elizabeth 
Boardman Post, sister of the bride. 
She wore a gown of French blue sil- 
ver cloth with a train of silver net, 
and carried American Beauty roses 
tied with French blue silver flowered 
gauze. 

The bridesmaids were Miss Sarah 
E. Cooper of Harrisburg, Pa., Miss 
Harriet Thompson of Hartford, Conn., 
Miss Charlotte Eddy of Xewton Cen- 
tre, and Mrs. Harrison P. Eddy, Jr., of 
Xewton Centre. They wore French 
blue georgette gowns with girdles of 
silver cloth and georgetto trains, and 
carried American Beauty roses tied 
with silver flowered gauze. 

The best man was Mr. Harrison P. 
Eddy, Jr., of Xewton Centre, the head 
usher, Mr. David J. Post, Jr., of Xew- 
ton Centre. 

The ushers were Mr. Chauncey B. 
Thompson of Hartford, Conn.. Mr. 
Richard G. Stall of Brockton, Mass., 
and Mr. A. Osgood Young of Worcester, 
Mass. The boutonnieres were gar- 
denias. 

Among the house guests were Miss 
Frances Rieckel of Providence, R. I.. 
Mrs. Andrew K. Jobe of Memphis. 
Tenn., and Mrs. William Brewster of 
New York. 

A reception nt the home of the bride, 
405 Washington street, Hartford, fol- 
lowed the ceremony. Mr. and Mrs. 
Randolph Eddy will reside at 9 Vic- 
toria Circle, Xewton Centre. 


FATAL ACCIDENT 

Lieut. Commander Walter G. Rich- 
ardson. U. S. X.. 59 years old; his son, 
Frederick G. Richardson, 20, both resi- 
dents of 871 Beacon street, Newton 
Centre, and Miss E. M. Matteson, 59, 
of 1828 Washington street, Auburn- 
dale, were instantly killed last week 
Thursday, at the Winnesquam cross- 
ing of the B. & M. Road, near Laconia, 
X. H., when the northbound Montreal 
Express struck and demolished the 
automobile in which they were riding. 

The bodies were thrown more than 
100 feet from the scene of the crash. 

Miss Matteson’s nephew, Lowell 
Speare of State Line, Mass., who was 
taken to the hospital in Laconia, sori- 
ously injured, died on Saturday. 

Mrs. Richardson, a son, Robert, and 
a baby daughter, Mary, were following 
in another automobile and witnessed 
the accident. The Richardsons were 
on the way to their summer cottage 
at Asquam Lake, Holderness. 

Lieut. Commander Walter G. Rich- 
ardson was well known in this city 
where he had lived for many years 
and being, since the outbreak of the 
war, attached to the 1st Naval. Dis- 
trict. Lately he had been connected 
with the Hydrographic Office in the 
Boston Customhouse. 

He was a classmate at Annapolis of 
Ex-Senator Weeks. He was born in 
Illinois, December 6. 1859, and entered 
Annapolis in 1876. In 1889 he retired 
from active duty because of an acci- 
dent but was recalled to service at 
the commencement of the recent hos- 
tilities. 

Miss Matteson had been a teacher 
in the manual training department of 
the Newton schools for the past 32 
years. 


FORMER RESIDENT DEAD 


Christopher E. Roberts, whose home 
was at 1619 Massachusetts avenue, 
Cambridge, died there on Sunday, fol- 
lowing illness which had been pro- 
longed through the past year. Mr. 
Roberts, who long was identified with 
the insurance business in Boston, 
was born sixty-three years ago in 
East Hartford, Conn. He came to 
Boston about forty years ago, when 
he became connected with the Hart- 
ford Steam Boiler Inspection & In- 
surance Company in its Boston office, 
of which for the past thirty-six years 
he had been the manager. When he 
assumed charge of the company’s 
terests in that city the business was 
small in its volume, but under his 
management it was built up to large 
proportions. 

Mr. Roberts lived for some time in 
Xewtonville, and while a resident 
there was one of the founders of the 
Newton Club, and he served in 1895- 
96, as a member of the Common Coun- 
cil in Xewton, and in 1897 was an 
alderman. He belonged to Dal- 
houise Lodge of Masons, and to the 
Royal Arcanum, and in Boston was a 
member of the Exchange Club and 
the Algonquin Club. Mr. Roberts mar- 
ried Miss Elizabeth P. Allen of Hart- 
ford, and is survived by his wife and 
a son, Harry A. Roberts, who lives in 
the West. W. H. Allen of Kirkstall 
road, is a brother-in-law of Mr. 
Roberts. 


LODGES 

The annual meeting of Dalhousie 
Lodge of Masons will be held next Wed- 
nesday evening and will be followed on 
Friday evening with a public installa- 
tion of the newly elected officers. Af- 
ter the installation ceremonies re- 
freshments will be served and there 
will be dancing in Temple hall. 


DOG SHOW 


Over 600 dogs ure entered for the 
Annuul Show of the Ladies' Kennel 
Club held toduy at Norumbegu Park. 



DIAMONDS 

I % • 

^*•41 SUMMER ST. BOSTON ^ 


DOMESTIC SCIENCE 


Miss Marian Keep, Editor 


running 


There are actually five methods of 
canning now in use; nnmelv, 

1. The open-kettle. 

2. The intermittent. 

3. The cold-water method. 

4. The vacuum-seal method. 

5. Tho cold-pack, single-period 
method. 

Of the five methods it has been 
found that the cold-pack Is the meth- 
od now in general use. In (his meth- 
od vegetables are blanched in boiling 
water, then quickly dipped in cold 
water, the skin removed and tho pro- 
duct cut into sizes for jars or packs. 
The products are then packed with- 
out further preparation, in glass jars 
or other containers. 

Hot sirup is added in the case of 
fruit, hot water and salt in the case 
of vegetables and greens sterilization 
is done in the jar or container after 
it is partially or entirely sealed, mak- 
ing it impossible for bacteria or 
spores to enter the container after the 
product has been sterilized. 

By this cold-pack method of can- 
ning all food products, including 
fruits, vegetables and meats, enn be 
successfully sterilized in a single pe- 
riod, with but one handling of the 
product in and out of the canner. 

Practically every type of fruit jar 
manufactured can lie successfully 
handled by the method and many food 
products may be canned by one set 
of directions. 

The government issues the follow- 
ing bulletin: 

United States Department of 
Agriculture, 

Washington. D. C. 

Home Canning by the One Period 
Cold Pack Method 

Copies of this bulletin may be ob- 
tained free from the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture. 

Carrot Marmalade 

2 c ground carrot. 

lMs c sugar. 

2 lemons. 

2 Mi tsp. ground ginger root.. 

Cook the carrot until tender, add 
sugar, lemon, cut in thin slices, and 
ginger root, cook slowly until thick, 
do not stir. Pack in hot jars and 
sterilize. 

Pineapple and Rhubarb 

% c ground carrot. 

% c shredded pineapple. 

llis c rhubarb (unpeeled). 

Hi c sugar. 

1 lemon. 

1 tsp. ginger root. 

Cook the carrot and pineapple un- 
til tender, add rhubarb cut in hi in. 
slices, lemon cut in thin slices, gin- 
ger and sugar, cook slowly without 
stirring until thick. Pack in hot jars 
and sterilize. 

How to (’an Rhubarb 

Wash the stalks clean. Cut them 
into pieces three-fourth of an inch in 
length (do not remove the skin). 
Blanch them 2 minutes. Cold dip. 
Pack them in glass jars (do not use 
tin cans). Pour on thick sirup (3 lbs. 
of sugar to 1 quart of water). Put 
the rubber and cap in position, not 
tight. Sterilize for 20 minutes. Re- 
move the jars. Tighten the covers. 
Invert the jars to cool and test the 
joint. Wrap the jars in paper to pre- 
vent bleaching. 

Breakfast 

Cream of Wheat Dates 

Creamed Fish on Toast Coffee or Milk 
Doughnuts 
Luncheon 
Crab Meat Salad 

French Fried Potatoes 
Graham Rolls Brownies 

Grapenut Pudding with Hard Sauce 
Dinner 

Boiled Rice Hamburg Steak 

Creamed Asparagus Sliced Tomatoes 
Chocolate Pie 


“YE DISTRICT SKEWL” 


Ye District Skewl at Blueberry Cor- 
ner was presented by the Woman’s 
.Guild of the Church of the Messiah, 
Auburndalo, Tuesday evening,, June 
3rd, under the direction of Mrs. Alice 
Heibeck. It was an all star cast. Mr. 
Harry B. Ross as Mr. Hezekiah Pen- 
dergrass gave a splendid original por- 
trayal of the part. Mr. John Burr as 
Samuel Snooks was fine. Mr. Fred 
Randall was an exceptionally good 
Bobby O’Lee. Mrs. W. Coulson as Sa- 
mantha Piper and Mrs. H. B. Budding 
.as Mehitable Jones were well adapted 
to their parts. Mr. Arthur Hancock 
as David Snobs and Bruce Carey as 
Jeremiah Jenkins and Mr. John Turn- 
er as Sim Dipsey had a line concep- 
tion of their parts. Mr. Robert Pier- 
pont made a very gracious chairman 
of the school committee. 

The rest of the cast were Mrs. Rob- 
ert Pierpont, Mrs. J. T. Johnson, Miss 
Edith Patchett, Mrs. G. F. Pond, Miss 
Elizabeth Hardy, Mrs. G. F. Severy, 
Miss Fay Allen, Miss Margaret John- 
son, Mr. Allan Dunlop, Mr. Clement 
Patchett. 

Miss Allen gave a very artistic But- 
terfly dance. , 

Much credit was due Mrs. Alice Hei- 
beck and her assistants. Mr. H. B. 
.Ross and Mrs. H. B. Budding which 
>vas shown by the beautiful flowers 
and fruit they received. 

Dancing and refreshments conclud- 
ed a very enjoyable evening. 


THE NEWTON BRANCH OF THE 
SPECIAL All) 


M rs. George S. Mumford, Boston 
chairman of the committee for devas- 
tated France, has written a letter ex- 
pressing much appreciation not only 
for the urticleB regularly contributed 
,by the Newton Branch of the Special 
Aid, but also for the undimiuished in- 
terest shown in tho work. This in- 
terest 1 b a source of great encourage- 
ment to the committee. 

The following extract from a letter 
from a Rumanian doctor reveals the 
conditions as they are at present in 
Rumania. 

“I am very thankful for giving mo 
wool for knitting socks for our sol- 
diers. I call them ‘ours’ because they 
fought for liberty in lighting for Ru- 
mania, too. Ill Rumania tho condi- 
tions are worse than in any other 
country, no food, no clothes, and ex- 
orbitant prices: — u loaf of bread 
$2.40, a pound of sugar $5 or $6, u 
quart of milk $1.60, a pair of shoes 
$120-$160. 


United Stats* rood Administration No. O-ITHI 

E. E. GRAY CO. 


Newtonville 
West Newton 


Newton Highlands 
Newton Upper Falls 
Newton Centre 


33 % Saved on Groceries 

CUTS FOR WEEK COMMENCING JUNE 9 

CORN, “On Top” Brand, can 15c 

Best Value in Southern Com 

SALMON STEAK, Red Fish, flat can 30c 

PEAS, Wisconsin Sweets, can 14c 

BEETS, Cut, Grayco Brand, can 18c 

CRANBERRY BEANS, Cut, “Maine Leader,” can 15c 

SARDINES, Best American, 2 cans 25c 

SHRIMP, Best Gulf Pack, can 15c 

PEACHES, Sliced, Grayco Brand, No. 2 can 24c 

PRUNES, (Cooked, ready to serve) 3 cans for 25c 

SOAP, “Pearl” White Laundry, 4 bars for 25c 

OLIVES, Mammoth Queen, Ricardo Brand, bottle 29c 

PREMIUM FLOUR, Nothing better milled, Vs bag $1.89 

SELF RAISING FLOUR, Grayco, 5 lb. bag 48c 

Best for Shortcake 

PINEAPPLE, Grated, Best Hawaiian, No. 2 can 30c 


LUDWIG FURS 



■jT • ’ ~ • ■ 




NEW MODELS FOR FALL AND WINTER OF 1919 
NOW READY 


NEWTON MEDICAL CLUB 


The annual outing of the Newton 
Medical Club will be held at the 
Manor, at Medfleld, Tuesday, June 10, 
1919. 


Maternity 
Gowns 

Skirts 

Smocks 
Petticoats 

FULL LINE 

Summer Dresses 

Maternity Corsets, 

' i Brassieres, Ruffles 

Miss Creed 

7 Temple Place, Boston 



The School 
Specializing in 
Business Efficiency 

Macdonald 
Commercial School 

Stenography, Typewriting 
and Bookkeeping 

80 Boylston St., Boston 

LITTLE BUILDING 
Tel. Beach 4822 


HERMANN SULZEN 

VIOLIN TRACIIER AND SOLOIST 
Terms, $2.00 per Lesson 
Available for Soctui AffrJn 
10 NONANTUM STREET NEWTON^ J 

Tel. Newton North 7S7-R 


Oriental 
Tea Company 

85-87 Court Street, Scoiluy So. 
BOSTON 

“Sign of Big Gold Tea Kettle” 
NOTED FOK ITS 

Quality COFFEES 
Quality TEAS 

Only Exclusive Tea and Coffee 
House in New England 

50 Years in tho Same Location 

Our Teas and Coffees Are Dependable 

Mall and Telephone orders given 
special attention. 


a a Bulbullan TsL Bsach 718 

Oriental Rug Works 

Cleaning, Stretching and Repairing ef 
AU Kinds 

Bags and Needle Art Works 
by Armenian Experts 
1M BOYLSTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 
Room 7Z4 

Residence, Jtuburndale — Tel. Con. 


Children’s Hair Cutting 

Young Women's Hair “Bobbed” 
Marcel Wave, Shampooing and 
Facial Massage 

Individual attention given by 
experts 

SALONE D I PIACERE 

Joseph A. Merenda, Prop. 
Formerly with Leading Hair 
Cutting Parlors of Boston 

Room 714 Blake Bldg. 

59 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON 
Tel. Beach 1133 


Miss MacConnell 

Hair Dressing, Face Treatment 
Manicure, Chiropody, Toilet Articles 1 
Moles, Warts and Superfluous Hair Removed*' 

429 CENTRE STREET 

Over Uabbard’s Pharmacy 

WANTED 

All kinds of Ladles' and Gentlemen'* 
cast-off clothing, furs, Jewelry, books, 
etc. „ 

MBS. MONAHAN 
27S Tremont Street, Boston 
Telephone Beach 5742 


HIGHEST PRICES 

Paid for bonds, diamonds, emeralds, 
pearls. Jewelry, platinum, old gold and 
silver; Coll. Loan tickets bought and 
loaned on; seo us before selling. J. 
ROY, 77 Hummer St., Boston. Room SI. 
1C st. 18 years; bank ref. 


American Wall Paper Co. 

We Carry a Well Selected Line of 

Foreign and Domestic WALL PAPERS 

Colors, Patterns and Combinations 
to Suit Every Requirement. 

Estimates furnished on Painting and Paper-Hanging 
43 CORNHILL, BOSTON (between Adams and Scollay Sq.) 
Telephone Haymarket 2415 


4 


Til K NKWTOlf GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNK «, 1019. 


7 



For 

Table Water 
of 

Delicious 

Purity 

and 

Exceptional 

Softness 


Nobscot Spring Water 


meets all the requirements. A health-giving necessity for 
every day in the year. Bottled and sealed at the spring in 
Framingham, Mass. 

Your Grocer Can Supply You 
If his policy is not to accommodate customers, advise us 
and we will give you names of grocers in your vicinity who 
are accommodating. 

Arrangements may be made to have Nobscot Water de- 
livered also at your summer home. 

Nobscot Mt. Spring Company 

Established 1892 

173 MILK STREET - - - BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone Fort Hill 860 


Old Natick Inn 

SOUTH NATICK, MASS. 



LETTKIt FROM TAMP JACKSON 


Many Newton people have pleasant 
recollections of Miss Helen McGrath 
and Miss Grnce Coffman of Seattle, 
Wash., who taught at the Stearns 
School at. Nonantum a few years ngo 
In exchange with two of our teacher*. 
Miss McGrath is now In the Red Cross 
service at Camp Jackson, near Colum- 
bia, S. C., and the following letter 
from her to Mrs. Orlando Mason of 
Clmrlesbank road gives an intoi eating 
picture of the daily life of those who 
aic devoting themselves to the restora- 
tion of the wounded : 


THE GEO. W. BUSH CO. 

BURT M. RICH, Propri.tor 

Funeral Directors 


Ketebllahad 1*74 


An LieatiA it 402 Centre Street 


I Nawtoa Nertk 4M-M 
| NewUa North **»-V 


AUTO UAMa-UMOniDn CABS 


COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 
REAL ESTATE 


Pursuant to a warrant to me direct- 
ed from the Probate Court of the 
County of Middlesex and Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, appointing 
me Commissioner to make partition of 
the land hereinafter described, dated 
May 23rd, 1919, I, having been first 
sworn, do hereby give public notice 
that pursuant to and by virtue of said 
warrant I shall sell at public auction 
on Saturday, June 14, at 3 P. M., on 
the premises hereinafter described, 
the Real Estate situated in Newton in 
said County of Middlesex and bounded 
and described as follows, to wit: 

(1) A certain parcel of land, with 
the buildings thereon, situated in that 
part of said Newton called West New- 
ton, bounded and described as fol- 
lows: beginning at the Northwesterly 
corner thereof, on Crescent Street 
near Webster Street at land now or 
late of Wright, and running Easterly 
by said Wright land, one hundred fifty 
15-100 (150.15) feet, to land formerly 
of David C. Sanger and now of the Ben- 
jamin S. Hatch Company; thence run- 
ning Southerly by said land of the 
Benjamin S. Hatch Company, sixty 
(60) feet to the parcel herein second 
described; thence running Westerly 
by said second described parcel, one 
hundred fifty (150) feet to said Cres- 
cent Street; thence running Northerly 
by said Crescent Street, sixty-seven 
(67) feet to the point of beginning; 
containing nine thousand five hundred 
twenty-five (9,525) square feet of land, 
more or less: being the same prem- 
ises described in a deed of Moody 
Merrill, Trustee, to Charles T. Allen, 
dated June 1. 1885, recorded with Mid- 
dlesex So. Dist. Deeds, Book 1711, 
Page 66: 

(2) Another certain parcel of land 
on said Crescent Street, hounded and 
described as follows: beginning at the 
Northwesterly corner thereof, on said 
Crescent Street, at the parcel herein- 
before first described, and running 
Easterly by said first described parcel, 
one hundred fifty (150) feet, to said 
land of the Benjamin S. Hatch Com- 
pany; thence running Southerly by 
said land of the Benjamin S. Hatch 
Company, sixty-seven (67) feet, to 
land now or late of Cruice; then run- 
ning Westerly by said Cruice land, 
oue hundred fifty (150) feet, to said 
Crescent Street; thence running 
Northerly by said Crescent Street to 
the point of beginning; containing ten 
thousand fifty (10,050) square feet of 
land, more or less: being the same 
premises described in the deed of 
Francis Murdoch, dated April 1, 1890, 
recorded with Middlesex So. Dist. 
Deeds, Book 1969, Page 384. 

EDMUND W. OGDEN, 

Commissioner. 

West Newton, Mass. 

May 30-June 6-13 


•I tint the rlrht (lUtanre from Newton to 
motor to dinner 

Tel. Natick 8610 MISS HARRIS, Mgr. 


W. H. WALLACE, Builder 

36 Vernon St, Newton 
N. N. 708-J 

Remodeling, Rooting and Jobbing 
promptly attended to 
Orders taken at 74)6 Elmwood St. 
N. N. 593- W 


Com inon wealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and all 
other persons interested In the estate 
of Alvin H. Clifford late of Newton 
in said County, deceased: 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to he the last will and tes- 
tament of said deceased has been pre- 
sented to said Court, for Probate, by 
Paul Clifford who prays that letters 
testamentary may he issued to him, 
the executor therein named, without 
giving a surety on his official bond. 

You aTe hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to he held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, on 
the sixteenth day of Jvfne A. D. 1919. 
at nine o’clock in the forenoon, to show 
cause, if any you have, why the same 
should not he granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in the 
Newton Graphic a newspaper published 
in Newton the last publication to be 
one day, at least, before said Court, 
and by mailing postpaid, or delivering 
a copy of this citation to all known 
persons interested in the estate, seven 
days at least before said Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntire, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-third day of May in the year 
one thousand nine hundred and nine- 
teen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
May 30-June 6-13. 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Bertha L. Evans late of 
Newton in said County, deceased. 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will and 
testament of said deceased has been 
presented to said Court, for Probate, 
by Robert H. Evans who prays that 
letters testamentary may he issued to 
him. the executor therein named, with- 
out giving a surety on his official 
bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, 
on the twenty-third day of June A.D. 
1919, at nine o’clock in the forenoon, 
to show cause, if any you have, why 
the same should not be granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the lust publication 
to be one day, at least, before said 
Court, and by mailing postpaid, or de- 
livering a copy of this citation to all 
known persons interested in the es- 
tate, seven days at least before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntire, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-sixth day of May In the year 
one thousand nine hundred and nine- 
teen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
May 30-June 6-13. 


THE LOMBARDY INN 

boston; 

DANCING ALL EVENING 

Boylaton Place, near Colonial Theatre 

Telephone* Beach 2941-2942 
Wine Service Open Till Midnight 

LOMBARDY BY-THE-SEA M <Form " ,y 



NORTH SC1TUATE BEACH 


itcltcll lloUM e 

OPENS JUNE 15lh 


NEWTON TAILORING CO. 413 Centre St. Newton Public l.lbran 

Ladies* and Meat’s Fine Tailoring 

Bulla made to ordar In latoat atjrloa. Cloanln*. ProMln*. Drains apd Ropairta* 

1 .ADIKM’ GARMENTS end ITU HR ALTER CD A HFEOIALTY 
Work callad for and daltvarad. Bpaolal arrancamanta lor aontklf praeale* 

Opee Kvaalaaa till B.SO. Tal. 704 -W Nowtoa Narlk 


The following letter gives an excel- 
lent idea of actual conditions in an 
army hospital. 

I can’t begin to tell you how much 
I enjoy Camp Jackson and my work 
here. Better than Bight-seeing and 
you remember how fond 1 am of seeing 
all the new places. 

Well, to begin with — have enjoyed 
the southern sunshine of a southern 
winter with no snow and no cold 
weather. We have had rainy days oc- 
casionally, but we can go all over the 
hospital area, something like 100 acres, 
without leaving the hoard walks, 
which are covered. Even should we 
have occasion to go off the walks there 
Is no mud as it is a regular sand dune 
with occasional pine trees, hut near by 
Is a wonderful forest of all kinds of 
frees and shrubs, also farm houses and 
fruit trees taken over by the Govern- 
ment, so we have had blossoms of some 
kind, since early in March. So many 
flowering trees and shrubs, including 
dogwood, laurel, wild magnolia, red 
hud, maple, the fringed elm. the latter 
Is one mass of white fringe — looks 
like a Christmas tree with tissu3 paper 
festoons. The shrubs are various, and 
many, the wild honeysuckle, big pink 
ones on bushes, small white ones on 
vines, also sweet shrub, jassmine, etc., 
and flowers of all kinds. I should like 
to go to the woods every day, but try 
to be satisfied with several times a 
week and usually twice on Sunday. 
An early morning walk, then we go 
with the hoys in the afternoon. We 
take any able to walk. Lust Sunday 
there were 43. Every one comes back 
with flowers which are sent to the 
different wards. 

You see we have to get up and have 
breakfast before 7.30 on Sunday same 
as other days, so it gives us a long day, 
hut far too short for me; go to services 
at “Y” at 11 A. M„ dinner at 12, to 
some of the wards for short visits as 
Sunday is so long for bed patients, 
then for walk, or Red Cross House, 
and services at Red Cross House that 
evening. In fact I spend most of my 
free time at Red Cross house for Con- 
valescents, as there are so many lonely 
hoys, so anxious to go home, some of 
us go over as often as possible to play 
games or just talk. 

So, I am sure you will forgive me for 
not writing, much as I love all my 
friends, I seldom stay home long 
enough to write letters, for the boys 
need our immediate help and time. 

During the week get up at 6 or 6.15 
take a walk or play tennis half an 
hour, before breakfast, put room in 
order for inspection, general inspection 
each Saturday, by ope of the Command- 
ing Officers. Go to work at 8 A. M. and 
seldom stop till 11.30 or 12; as we have 
the same patients each day and they 
come at certain hours, usually several 
at a time, so we don’t need to wait. 
We work in one building, that is. the 
girls in the Physio-Therapy Depart- 
ment. Those in the occupational work, 
go to the different wards. 

We treat gun shot and shrapnel 
wounds, fractures, ankylosed joints, 
arthritis, adhesions, scar tissues, nerve 
wounds, partial paralysis, etc. We 
give massage, remedial exercises, elec- 
tro- and liyro-therapy. baking or radi- 
ant heat and formal gymnastics. Each 
given with a liberal dose of good cheer 
and sympathy. 

Begin again at 1 P. M.. usually finish 
at 3.30, I frequently go upstairs for a 
checker game with one of the bed 
patients, then to a dancing class for 
patients on Mon. and Wed., other days 
to typewriting for half or three-quar- 
ters of an hour. Then after supper to 
Red Cross or a walk till 8 when we 
usually have movies or some program 
at “Y” or Red Cross. 

Of course there are variations. Some 
days, we get thru sooner, wash. iron, 
or do the usual stunts necessary. Then 
Saturday we finish ubout 12.30, hut 
there are many things planned for 
those few hours. Occasionally we go to 
Columbia hut not often. It takes a fif- 
teen minutes’ walk and thirty minutes 
on the street car and nothing of spe- 
cial interest when you get there, altho 
it is the capital of the State. Just an 
old fashioned southern, overgrown vil- 
lage. Always glad to re; urn to Camp 
and country life. 

Until two weeks ago I had ten room- 
mates — eleven of us in one of the 
nurse’s barracks. It was a very inter- 
esting experience and good for all of 
us, but we have our own rooms now 
and I surely appreciate mine. I be- 
lieve there are thirty aides here now, 
they keep coming so fast, have really 
lost count, and seldom see them altho 
twenty-six of us room in the same 
building, but seldom eat at the same 
time. 

Easter morning we had an Fluster 
egg hunt and made every one get up at 
6.45 after some growling, I’ll admit, 
hut we ull got to breakfast about the 
same time, quite an event. ’Pile Physio- 
Therapy girls or P. T.’s fixed up two 
baskets for the thirty patients in the 
two wards in same building where we 
work. They are upstairs, hut most of 
them are our regular patients and us 
we see them all every day we feel quite 
well acquainted. We had a little chick- 
en or rubbit tied to a curd with yellow 
ribbon, for each boy. Also plenty of 
homemade candy and candy eggs. Sent 
them over for the breakfast table. 
Also took colored eggs and candy to 
many of the other patients especially 
those in bed. That afternoon over 
sixty aides and patients met on a little 
sandy hillside quite near the hospital 
and tousted weenies on sticks over a 
bonfire. These were put between 
thick slices of bread, spread with some 
mustard. Also had some pickles and 
Jam furnished by Red (’ross House 
mother, and finished with apples, or- 
anges and stick candy. 

The aides furnished the eats and all 
seemed to enjoy the occasion very 
much. It was such a treat to many of 
the boys, being the first time out to 
the woods, many came on crutches or 
with canes. Those able to walk went 
further und returned for lunch. 


They gel wb home i espeethlly on 

such special days, we try to do some- 
thing different. 

Of course those able to work on 
toys, baskets, etc., or attend the voca- 
tional school do not find the days so 
long. 

Wish you could see some of the In- 
teresting things made in .the different 
wards. The baskets are perfectly won- 
derful, especially those made of pine 
needles and colored raffia. 

The Columbia ladles are so kind In 
bringing cake and various good things 
to the different wards, usually once a 
week, and I assure you It is much en- 
joyed and appreciated by the boys. 

We are supposed to put out our 
lights at 10 1’. M. and Taps remind me 
to say Good night. 

Sincerely, 

HELEN McGIlATH. 
NEWTON 25 YEARS AGO 

From the Newton Gruphic of 
May 4, 1894 


Hotel Hunnewell leased to Wm. F. 
Bowman. 

Aldermen after long debate refuse to 
grant several druggists’ licenses out 
of a long list. 

Reception by Mrs. C. E. Adams of 
Grove Hill in honor of Mrs. S. J. 
Brown. 

Deuth of Miss Augusta Page of New- 
tonville. 

Reception tendered Rev. Dr. and 
Mrs. T. P. Prudden at the Second 
Church, West Newton. 

$5000 fire at Adams school house, 
Newtonville. 

Wedding of Miss Alice N. Gardiner 
of Newton Centre and Mr. William T. 
Payne of Japan. 

Wedding of Miss Florence Furber 
and Mr. Andrew M. Kistler of Newton 
Centre. 

Deaths of Mr. Michael Begley of 
Newton Upper Falls and Mr. Martin 
Nash of Newton Lower Falls. 

School committee recommend new 
school house in place of Adams school. 

May 11, 1894 

('banning Church observes birthdav 
of its pastor. Rev. F. B. Hombrooke. 

Austin T. Sylvester chosen Chief 
Marshal of Memorial Day parade. 

City government votes $200,000 for 
construction of Newton Central boule- 
vard, now Commonwealth avenue. 

Frederick M. Mitchell appointed ser- 
geant of police. 

Brilliant class reception in the hall 
in new Bray building, Newton Centre. 

Wedding of Miss E. Josephine Lewis 
and Mr. Arthur S. Kimball. 

Resignation of Rev. Calvin Cutler as 
pastor of Auburndale congregational 
church accepted to take effect a year 
later. 

May 18, 1894 

Miss Marianna W. Blood killed in 
runaway accident at Brattleboro, Vt. 

69th graduating exercises held at the 
Newton Theological Institution. 

Death of Mr. Edwin M. Thayer of 
Newtonville. 

Newtonville Woman’s Guild observes 
10th anniversary. 

May 25, 1894 

G. P. Atkins opens new store In Lan- 
caster block. 

Funeral services held at Immanuel 
Baptist Church for George S. Harwood 
whose death took place abroad. 

Public meeting in Eliot hall on pro- 
posed beautification of the Charles 
river. 

Mr. F. M. Crehore resigns as u mem- 
ber of the Newton Water Board. 

Annual prize drill at Lasell Semi- 
nary. 

Fire badly damages residence of Mr. 
E. B. Haskell at Auburndale less than 
five hours after his return from a trip 
around the world. 

Wedding of Mr. C. G. Carley and 
Miss Hattie G. Niclioll. 

Knights of Pythias organized in 
Newtonville. 

Mr. ami Mrs. George H. Crocker of 
Newtonville observe golden wedding. 

Sunday School of Second church ob- 
serves its 75th anniversary. 

Reception tendered Rev. E. P. Burtt. 
new pastor of Baptist church at West 
Newton. 

Reception to Rev. T. W. Bishop at 
Centenary M. E. Church. Auburndale. 

Annual meeting of North Side Im- 
provement Society and name changed 
to Garden City Improvement Society. 

Annual inspection of Gethsemane 
Commanderv. Knights Templars. 

Wedding of Mr. Charles E. Kelsey 
and Miss Carrie M. Pratt. 

Strike at Newton Mills. Upper Falls. 


REAL ESTATE 


William J. Cozens and Sons of New- 
ton Highlands and Newtonville have 
sold for Isabella W. Johnson, the es- 
tate at 6S Erie avenue, Newton High- 
lands. to Arthur F. Carey of Water- 
town. After making alterations, Mr. 
Carey will occupy the premises. The 
Assessed valuation is $6500 of which 
$5300 is on the house and $1200 on 
the land. 

The property at 19 Bowdoin street, 
Newton Highlands, has been pur- 
chased by .Mabel R. Steere of Brook- 
line. This estate which consists of 
a modern single house und about 9000 
feet of land, is assessed for $3900 of 
which $3000 is on the house and $900 
on the land. The new owner will oc- 
cupy. 

William J. Cozens and Son also re- 
port that final papers have been passed 
on the sale of 34 Collins road, Wabun, 
for Jesse G. Gould of Wuhan to Albin 
L. Richards. The house and 29,300 
feet of luml are assessed for $6500. 

William J. Cozens and Son also re- 
port the following leases: 

68 Hartford Btreet, Newton High- 
lands for C Peter Clark of Newton 
Centre, to Frank Merservey of New- 
ton llighlamls. 

985 Boylston street. Newton High- 
lands, to Charles R. King of Newton- 
ville. 

470 Albemarle road, Newtonville, to 
James R. Harper, of Boston. 

23 Dicke! man road, Newton High- 
lands. for Alice D. Jones to F. C. Cur- 
rier. 

325 Albemarle road. Newtonville, 
for W. J. Hannan to K. 1* Dltniar. 

Store 1219 Chestnut street. Newton 
Upper Falls, to M. Hurwttz and D. 
Berger. 

• WojPtw Wore • 

NLvvvx l»av‘UA Mutual Autu Ins. Cq 
Automobile Muliinl Liability ins. Cu 
40 Central Street, Boston 


Demonstration Home Garden 


Now that the peas and root crops are 
up and growing in good shape and the 
early plantings of beans are poking 
through the ground. It is time to think 
about the subject of cultivation. 

You will find that the weeds are try- 
ing their hardest to let you know of 
their presence. These should be 
"nipped In the bud." so to speak. Per- 
haps the most practical method of tak- 
ing the weeds in hand is to rake the 
soil thoroughly between the rows with 
a garden rake having long, pointed 
teeth. The soil between the narrow 
rows can he chopped up with a hoe. 
A scuffle hoe Is a most useful cultivat- 
ing tool with which to work between 
the rows. 

All plants need moisture, air and 
warmth for a proper development. The 
soil should be loosened up by cultivat- 
ing so that the warm air can penetrate 
the ground. 

Another reason for cultivating is to 
conserve the soli moisture. When a 
crust forms on the surface of the gar- 
den the soil moisture is rapidly evapor- 
ated. The surface should never be al- 
lowed to get In this condition. 

It is especially Important to cultivate 
the garden after every heavy rain as 
the soil Is always packed hard. Culti- 
vation of the gurden also helps to make 
the plant food In the soil available. 

Several inquiries have come to the 
office during the past week in regard 
to the control and eradication of ants. 
Where there are a few small ant hills 
In the garden the ants may be de- 
stroyed by pouring scalding hot water 
down the holes. If this method is not 
successful purchase a small can of car 
bon bisulphide. Punch holes a foot 
deep among the infested area and pour 
3 or 4 teaspoonfuls of the liquid into 
each one. Plug up the holes. The 
fumes from the liquid will penetrate 
the soil in all directions and kill the 
ants. 

Tomato, eggplants, and pepper plants 
may be set out any time now. Beans, 
corn, cucumbers, squashes and melons 
may he planted with safety. 

Thinning may be started in many 
gardens at this time. Beets, carrots, 
parsnips, lettuce and radishes should 
not he neglected until their growth is 
checked by crowding. If beets are not 
planted too thickly, they may be al- 
lowed to grow about 6 inches high be- 
fore thinning and then used for greens. 


N. H. S. 


The Monday and Wednesday morn- 
ing periods are now being given over 
to the senior class for the practice of 
songs for graduation. The program 
will he a patriotic one. A class song 
has been written and if music is com- 
posed for it it will be sung as part 
of the exercises. The school orchestra 
conducted by Mr. Walton will play 
the accompaniments. 

It is the custom of the senior class 
to give a class party on the night of 
graduation. This year it will be held at 
the home of Eunice Harriman of New- 
ton. All those who are sub-seniors as 
well as the seniors are invited. The 
committee was composed of Helen 
Shelton, Elinor Bright, Henry Pink- 
ham, and Stephen Palmer, 

Graduation will he Saturday, June 
14th, at 2.30. All examinations for 
seniors will he over on June 6. It was 
voted at a meeting of the senior class 
on Monday to omit flowers at grad- 
uation. 

As is usually done the June number 
of the Review will not be issued until 
after graduation. 

The Newtonian will not be issued 
until late this year. The Seniors will 
probably receive theirs just before 
graduation. 

Newton Centre 

— Mrs. Alfred H. Mosher of Beacon 
street is spending the summer in Nova 
Scotia. 

— Mrs. Robert McClelland of Lyman 
street has gone to Nova Scotia, where 
she will spend the summer. 

— The Newton Centre branch of the 
American Red Cross will close its 
house in Newton Centre after the 
day’s work is over on Thursday. June 
12tli. and will reopen for work on 
Monday. September 15th. This vaca- 
tion is taken because it is felt that the 
workers have earned a rest and not 
because there is no further call for 
their help and it is expected that they 
will come together again in Septem- 
ber with renewed enthusiasm. For 
those who wish home work there will 
he both sewing and knitting. The 
home department will distribute the 
sewing and the Red Cross House will 
he open July 3rd and August 7th from 
10 A. M. to 12 M. for the distribution 
of wool or work, or they may be ob- 
tained of Mrs. Morton E. Cobh, 170 
Lake avenue. 

West Newton 

— Mrs. J. Parker B. Fiske of 
Perkins street is entertaining her 
son from Washington. D. C. 

— Mr. W. C. Safford of Chestnut 
street has sold his estate to Mr. R. 
E. Thomas of Boston who buys for a 
home. 

— Mrs. J. S. Alley of Chestnut street 
has sold her estate to Mr. C. F. Hen- 
de.son of Watertown, Mass., who buys 
for immediate occupancy. 

— Mr. Carleton T. Smith, who sailed 
in January for Constantinople with 
the Armeniun and Syrian Relief, re- 
cently spent several days in Sofia, the 
capital of Bulgaria. He hc% just re- 
ceived orders to report at Adana (Tur- 
key in Asia), for hospital work. 

Newton Hiffi'la ids 

— Mrs. Pitflehl is expected to return 
soon to her residence ou Floral 
street. 

—Mr. M. C. Wallace and family of 
Fisher avenue have moved to Lake 
avenue. 

Mr. K. II. Clark bus rented his 
house on Winchester street to Mr. W. 
H Weir. 

—Rev. G. T. Smart of the Cougre- 
gatiouul Church has bceu granted a 
leave of ahseuce until September on 
account of his health. 

— Isabella W. Johnson has sold to 
Arthur K. Carey of Watertowu the es- 
tate at 68 Erie aveuue. The ussessed 
valuation is $6500. 








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TIIE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 0, 1919, 


GINGER ALE 

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Ale. and it MUST b* White House.” 

For the warm -prln* tiny* at hand, no drink la mm 
refreshing and satisfying as White Ilouae Ture Ginger 

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White House Pure Ginger Ale Is the drink you can 
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Bottlers of Quality Orangeade. Sarsaparilla. Root Beer 
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PAXTON’S 

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catered to in superior style. 
Simple, and most elaborate 
menus sent upon request. j 

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Tel 619- W 


Commonwealth of Massachu setts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To all persons interested in the es- 
tate of Emily DeBacon Page late of 
Newton in said County, deceased: 
WHEREAS. Harry E. Richards the 
executor of the will of said deceased, 
as presented for allowance, the first 
“ccount of his administration upon the 
state of said deceased: 

You arc hereby cited to appear at 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
ridge in said County, on the twenty- 
ourth day of June A.D. 1919, at nine 
’clock in the forenoon, to show 
ause, if any you have, why the same 
hould not be allowed. 

And said executor is ordered to 
erve this citation by delivering a 
opy thereof to all persons interested 
the estate fourteen days at least 
efore said Court, or by publishing 
he same once in each week, for three 
uccessive weeks, in the Newton 
raphic a newspaper published in 
ewton the last publication to be one 
ay at least before said Court, and by 
ailing, post-paid, a copy of this ci- 
~tion to all known persons interested 
n the estate seven days at least be- 
ore said Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
uire, First Judge of said Court, this 
wenty-ninth day of May in the year 
ne thousand nine hundred and nine- 
een. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

une 6-13-20 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Iddlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT, 
o the heirs-at-law, next of kin and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Anna M. Paul late of New- 
ton in said County, deceased. 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
urporting to be the last will and tes- 
‘ment of said deceased has been pre- 
ented to said Court, for Probate, by 
amuel A. Whitney who prays that 
etters testamentary may be issued to ; 
im, the executor therein named, with- 
ut giving a surety on his official bond. 
You are hereby cited to appear at a 
obate Court, to be held at Cam- 
dge in said County of Middlesex, 
the ninth day of June A. D. 1919, at 
e ''’clock in the forenoon, to show 
Be. if any you have, why the same 
uld not be granted, 
nd said petitioner is hereby di- 
Jed to give public notice thereof, 
publishing this citation once in each 
ek, for three successive weeks, in 
Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
hed in Newton the last publication 
be one day, at least, before said 
urt, and by mailing postpaid, or de- 
ering a copy of this citation to all 
own persons Interested in the es- 
te, seven days at least before saiu 
urt 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
Ire, First Judge of said Court, this 
irteenth day of May In the year one 
ousand nine hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register, 
y 23-30-June 6. 

Notice Is hereby given that the sub- 
riber has been duly appointed ex- 
utrix of the will of Alexander M. 
rris late of Newton in the County 
Middlesex, deceased, testate, and 
s taken upon herself that trust by 
ing bond, us the law directs. All 
rsons having demunds upon the es- 
te of said deceased are hereby re- 
ired to exhibit the same; and all 
rsons indebted to said estate are 
lied upon to make payment to 

EMMA J. FERRIS, Executrix. 
Address) 

87 Washington St., 

Newton. Muss. 

May 28, 1919. 
ay 30-June 6-13. 


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Telephone Richmond 2374 
We carry a large stock of Andlrooa, Fire 
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TKACHEKH 


L. EDWIN CHASE 

Teacher of 

Violin Mandolin Guitar 

WIU Receive Pupils After Oet. 10 At His 
NEW STUDIO 
• 15 WASHINGTON STREET 
(Opp. R. R. Station) 

N EWTON VILLE 

Telephone: Newton West 1052-11 

ADDRESS: 2202 COMMONWEALTH AYE.. AUBURNOALE 



G. P. ATKINS 

396 Centre Street, Newton 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


DOMESTIC SCIENCE 


SOLDIERS’ MEMORIAL 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Harriet E. Sanborn late of 
Newton in said County, deceased, 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will and 
testament of said deceased has been 
presented to said Court, for Probate, 
by Mary Alice Sanborn who prays that 
letters testamentary may be Issued to 
her, the executrix therein named, 

M. Alice Sanborn without giving 
surety on her official bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, on 
the twenty-third day of June A.D. 
1919. at nine o’clock In the forenoon, 
to show cause, if any you have, why 
the same should not he granted. 

And suid petitioner is hereby di- 
rected to give public notice thereof, 
by publishing this citation once in 
each week, for three successive weeks, 
in the Newton Graphic a newspaper 
published in Newton the last publica- 
tion to be one day, at least, before said 
Court, and by mailing postpaid, or de- 
livering a copy of this citation to all 
known persons interested in the es- 
tate, fourteen days at leaBt before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntlre, Eh- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-seventh day of May In the year 
one thousand nine hundred and nine- 
teen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
May 30-June 6-13. 


.Miss Marian Keep, Editor 

Now Is n very good time to plan for 
the summer The housewife will look 
forward to the spring and summer 
days, instead of dreading them, if she 
will plan to save her strength. She 
cun do so by avoiding methods which 
are tiresome, hot and burdensome. 

Certainly there is nothing more tir- 
ing than working in a hot. steamy kit- 
chin on one of our typical July days. 
Not only the housewife feels the effects 
hut the whole family as well. 

Here’s a suggestion have you ever 
tried a tireless cooker? Some people 
will say It’s a luxury but they are 
usually the ones who have never tried 
the cooker or who have not realized its 
advantages, through lack of knowledge. 
Today we rarely consider a device 
which saves time, money, and strength 
a luxury hut rather a necessity. 

Foods cooked In the Fireless are de- 
liciously tender, well flavored and they 
retain their full weight and nutriment, 
since there is little or no evaporation. 
Foods in the process of cooking in the 
Fireless do not have to he watched, 
turned, stirred or basted. All of the 
work and worry connected with the 
cooking, after the food has been pre- 
pared is done away with, in the use of 
Fireless. The food will not overcook, 
burn or dry up and it may be kept in 
the cooker for hours and will be hot 
and delicious. 

In the modern Fireless cooker foods 
may be roasted, baked, steamed, 
stewed, or boiled, fried and broiled. 
In it can be cooked fish, clams, and all 
sea foods: baked beans; vegetable din- 
ner; beef. pork. ham. chicken, meats 
of every description, all vegetables, 
every kind of breakfast food, and some 
puddings. 

Recipes 
Baked Fish 

Clean fish, sprinkle well with salt 
inside and out, stuff and sew. Cut five 
diagonal gashes in each side of back 
bone and insert narrow strips of 
fat salt pork. Place in greased 
eight quart pall, sprinkle with salt 
and pepper, brush over with butter, 
dredge with flour and place around fish 
small pieces of salt pork. Bake one 
hour. Use two radiators 475 degrees. 

Turbot of Fish 
2 % c. flaked fish 
iyj c. milk 

1 slice onion 
V\ c. butter 

2-3 bread crumbs 
sprig parsley 
Vi c. flour 
Vs tsp. salt 
1-3 tsp. pepper 
yolk of 2 eggs 
lemon juice 

Scald milk, onion and parsley to- 
gether remove seasoning. Melt butter 
add flour, pepper and salt and add 
gradually to the milk, then add egg 
slightly beaten. Put layer of fish on 
the buttered dish. Sprinkle with salt 
and pepper and add a few drops of 
lemon juice. Cover with the white 
sauce, continue until dish is full. Cover 
with crumbs and bake 30 minutes with 
two disks heated to 475 degrees. 

Beef Stew 

2 lbs. round steak 
4 potatoes 

1 onion 
1 slath celery 
1 turnip 
4 potatoes 
1 carrot 
1 tsp. salt 

3 c. water 

Remove skin from meat, cut meat 
into inch pieces, place in kettle add 
water and seasoning, boil 10 minutes 
Dice carrot, potatoes, turnip and celery 
Into half inch cubes and add to mix- 
ture. Place In .cooker for three hours 
Thicken with four tablespoons of flour 
and half cup water well mixed. Use 
one radiator heated to 450 degrees. 

Asparagus 
Cut off lower part of stalk as far 
down as they will snap and add four 
tablespoons boiling water. Transfer to 
cooker, using one hot radiator. Cook 
one hour. 

Spinach 

Clean and wash spinach, carefully re- 
moving roots, place in kettle add four 
tablespoons of boiling water, salt. 
Place in cooker, use one hot disk, for 
one hour; drain, add butter, serve with 
hard boiled eggs. 


To the Editor: 

It has been said and rightly that 
we must consider carefully what Is 
suitable, as a memorial to our sol- 
diers both living and dead. 

We are all agreed, I believe, that it 
should be something that would em- 
body the spiritual appeal that the 
Cause of Democracy made to our 
men, that it should be a living thing 
embodying and ip some way contin- 
uing the splendid spirit with which 
those men went forward to fight for 
our liberties. 

We have heard so much during the 
war of their splendid morale. The 
dictionary defines “morale” as "a 
state of mind of a body of men”. To 
us after this war morale will denote 
fully as much a spiritual as a mental 
attitude. Morale will connote to our 
thinking, not only the splendid spirit 
of the men. but all those affiliated war 
work agencies which the men felt 
were supporting, and hacking them 
and re-creating them both mentally 
and physically, during those difficult 
days at the front. 

Would the men themselves feel con- 
tent with any memorial that failed to 
take into account these agencies that 
they grew to love, would they be real- 
ly content with a memorial that failed 
also to continue the spirit of service 
to others, the spirit of keeping our- 
selves fit in order to serve others — 
the spirit to "carry on" and to teach 
our children to carry on. to make it 
possible for all the children, and 
young people, and older citizens of 
the future to carry on. 

Our vision is a memorial building, 
with exterior appeal of beauty and 
permanence, as you enter: a mem- 
orial hall which will make us catch 
our breath in silent tribute to those 
who have paid the last supreme sac- 
rifice, in tribute to their comrades who 
stood beside them ready to give their 
all were it taken: feeling, similar to 
that caused by the Hall of Flags at the 
State House. 

Through this hall should pass every 
week those concerned in guiding the 
work of such agencies as the Red 
Cross and allied organizations for our 
whole city, to their headquarters, 
through it also those engaged in 
community service: that work if not 
born of the spirit of fellowship and 
democracy of this war, certainly spon- 
sered and fathered by it; through this 
hall should pass all the youth of our 
city, not once a year on Memorial Day 
only or such other great occasions, 
but almost daily large groups of the 
boys and girls of our High Schools, 
two thousand, and again two thou- 
sand, every four or five years, the 
thousands that have finished High 
School would easily bend their accus- 
tomed steps to Newtonville constant- 
ly; through it should pass the young 
men and women who do not go as far 
as High School but who would gladly 
turn to a hall of Physical training that 
belonged to them personally because 
it belonged to the community, the 
City of Newton. 

Harvard men say that passing daily 
through their Memorial Hall, mem- 
orial to the men who died in the Civil 
War, has made a lasting impression 
upon them. 

It has been said that this present 
war was fought for the children, for 
the democracy of the future. In our 
vision we see an endless procession 
of those children, youth and citizens 
of the future, going through this 
Memorial Hall, receiving its silent im- 
print on their souls, going on through 
to the Hall of Physical Training which 
shall keep their bodies fit that they in 
turn may continue and keep up the 
morale of the future, and carry on 
this Spirit of Service. 

Sincerely, 

Alice Marshall Leeds 


NEWTON FREE LIBRARY 


Country Life, Fanning ami Gardening, 
Some Hooks of Today 
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el. Newton North XI72-M Kstahllsln-O 1000 

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HurKKomoUallng u Spoululty 
Work Called For mud II ell r Mod Coalraet rr<Mlm< 

07 Centre Street, opp. Post Office Newton 


Albee, H. R. A kingdom of two; 
true romance of country life. 

Y-A328 k 

Butterfield. K. L. The farmer and the 
new day. HEA B98 

Crosby. C. R. Manual of vegetable 
garden insects. RIT-C88 

Crow. M F. The American country 
girl. R€K 

Dick. J. H. Garden guide, amateur 
gardener’s handbook. RI-D55 

Dyer, W. A. The humble annals of a 
back yard. RIS-D98 

Eaton, W. P. Barn doors and byways, 
Y-E14 b 

Farrington, E. I. The country home 
month by month. RG-F24 

Findlay, IT. Practical gardening. 

vegetables and fruits. RI-F49 

Free, M. War gardens, a pocket guide. 

RIA-F87 

Fullerton, E. L. The book of the 
home garden. R1-F95 

Galpin, C. J. Rural life. RGC-C13 
Gould, H. P. Peach growing. 

RII-G76 

Lyon, T. L. Soils, their properties 
and management. RGF-L98 

, McArthur, P. The red cow and her 
friends (pleasures and cares of rural 
life, with special attention to furm 
animals). RGC-M11 

McMahon, J. R. Success in the 
suburbs, how to locute, buy and 
build. ROC-M22 

I Pack, C. L. The war garden victor! 

ous. RIA-P12 

Rankin, W. H. Manual of tree ills 
euses. RJD-R16 

Roberts, IT. A. Commercial poultry 
raising. RKV-R54 

Rogers, E. W. The Journal of a coun 
try woman. RGC-R63 

Sawyer, J. D. How to make a country 

. place WIS-S271 

Washburn, F. L. Injurious insects uml 
useful birds. RIT-W27 

Wiley, H. W. The lure of the lund 

farming ufter fifty. RG-W64 L 

.Wood, A. C. Old days on the farm 

RGC-W84 


REAL ESTATE 


WOMEN’S CLUBS 


Grace M. Burt, Editor. 


John T. Burns & Sons, Inc., report 
that they have sold for the Sudbury 
Real Estate Trust their property at 45 
Waban Hill road. Chestnut Hill. It 
consists of a single family 12-room 
house of hollow tile construction with 
stucco exterior and tiled roof together 
with 8598 square feet of land. The 
property is assessed for 18,500 and the 
purchaser is Reginald W. Fessenden 
who buys for occupancy. 

John T. Burns & Sons. Inc., also re 
port that they have sold for Bertha 
Rogers her ten-room frame house to- 
gether with garage and 11,700 square 
feet of land situated at 34 Woodcliff 
road, Newton Highlands. The assessed 
value is $5500. Evelyn R. Licktner pur- 
chases for a home. 

The same concern report that they 
have sold to H. E. Every the single 
family 10-room house situated at 48 
Islington road, Auburndale. With the 
house there are 35440 square feet of 
land and the total assessment is $8500. 
Amy E. Whiting was the grantor. 

John T. Burns & Sons Inc., also re 
port the sale for Albert H. Waite of his 
single frame house situated at 15 
Blackstone terrace, Newton. With the 
house there are 6000 square feet of 
land and t lie total assessment on the 
same is $7300. Clifton W. Jacobes buys 
for a home and after improvement will 
occupy. 

The same concern has also sold for 
Frederick D. Wellington his two fam- 
ily frame house numbered 41 and 43 
Cross Street, West Newton. With the 
house there are 7200 square feet of 
land and the assessed value of the 
same Is $5200. John J. Goddard pur- 
chases for a home and investment. 

WINS GERMAN HELMET 


En route for Asheville. 

Ten Massachusetts women and one 
from Maine comprised the Federa- 
tion party leaving for Asheville Sun- 
day morning by the Colonial express 
At Providence ten Rhode Island wo- 
men, past and' present presidents, 
Joined the party, while at New Haven 
Vermont and Connecticut representa- 
tives and one from Stockbridge, Mass., 
augmented the party. Two more Mas- 
sachusetts women came aboard at 
New York. Getting acquainted or ce- 
menting friendships already formed 
upon other trips or watching the coun- 
try from the car window filled the 
time on Sunday and the day passed 
quickly and night had barely fallen 
when Washington was reached. Even 
the hours there were occupied by the 
most enterprising of the party for a 
brisk walk to the Capitol, the presi- 
dents of the Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island setting the pace of New Eng- 
land, which was, however, some slack- 
ened Into a Southern stroll ere the 
time was over. Once aboard the sleep- 
ers the delegates were soon glad to 
turn in for the night — a night begun 
in Virginia anil ended in North Caro- 
lina. The misty rain which had be- 
gun to fall in Boston was soon left 
behind and sunshine greeted the par- 
ty in New York, though farther south 
the sky was overcast and Monday 
morning we awoke to find ourselves 
In a fog which has burned off into p 
beautiful summer day. 

Changes in vegetation from Massa- 
chusetts, where certain trees were 
still bare houghed or yet to reach their 
full foliage, to North Carolina with 
that of mid-summer have been inter- 
esting to watch. The immense and 
early spring flowers have given place 
to fields white with daisies and yel- 
low with gorse and banks covered with 
honeysuckle. Even the color of the 
soil has deepened from the light 
brown of Massachusetts to red of 
Connecticut, still deeper red of New 
Jersey to the almost brick red clay 
of North Carolina. Whole fields of 
this soil with corn just coming up or 
the gray green of the oats add pic- 
turesque color to the landscape. 

At noon on Monday the foothills of 
the Blue Ridge are coming in sight. 
The forests are not so different from 
New England for while there are 
plenty of pines the hard woods pre- 
/ a i 1 with oaks abounding. 

At Salisbury we breakfasted under 
the kindly ministration of a benevo- 
lent darkey in spectacles, "Just help 
you’selves, ladies; make you’selves at 
home; eat all you want," and we did, 

hominy, steak, eggs, and beaten 
biscuit. There at Salisbury was the 
waiting room with the sign over the 
loor "White People” and another 
with "Colored People” and the sepa- 
rate cars filled with darkies. 

Time fails to tell of all the picka- 
ninnies seen by the way, of the beau- 
tiful mountain stream we are follow- 
ing, as we climb, climb, climb to the 
"Land of the Sky.” 


RIG OPEN AIR MEETING 


Next Sunday afternoon. June 8th. 
at 4 o’clock on the Y. M. C. A. grounds 
will be held an open air meeting. 
There will be good singing and an or- 
chestra under the leadership of Mr. 
F. R. Doubleday. Dean Nathan E. 
Wood of Boston will be the speaker. 
Many wil remember him as the preach- 
er at Eliot Church while Mr. Person 
was away at Camp Devens last win- 
ter. This meeting is for everyone. 

Come and enjoy the music and the 
speaking! 

In case of a sudden shower the 
meeting will he held in the building. 


CHI RUH NOTICE 


First Church of Christ, Scientist, of 
Newton. Player’s Hall, Washington 
street. West Newton. Sunday sefvlce 
10.45 A. M. Subject of lesson-sermon: 
"God The Only Cause and Creator.” 
Sunday School 10.45 A. M. Testimoni- 
al meeting Wednesday 8 P. M. The 
public Is cordially invited to attend 
the services and to use the Reading 
Room at 297 Walnut street, Newton- 
/ille, which is open daily from 2 to 6 
in the afternoon, anil on Tuesday and 
Saturday evenings from 7.30 until 9. 


PLYMOUTH THEATRE — "Oh. 
Boy!" the dainty musical comedy, the 
tuneful melodies, witty lines, humor- 
ous situations and pretty girls of 
which took the country by storm when 
originally produced, has been select 
ed as the opening offering for Carl 
Hunt’s summer season of musical com- 
edies at the Plymouth Theatre be- 
ginning Monday night. The ensemble 
was selected anil trained personally 
by E. C. Howe, the musical director, 
and is not only the prettiest aggrega 
tion of young women ever seen on a 
Boston stage, but also is possessed of 
rare ability to dance and sing. Mat- 
inees will bo given every Thursday; a 
different popular musical comedy will 
be produced each week. 


Stanton R. White, son of Mr. anil 
Mrs. Augustus E. White of 34 Trinity 
terrace, Newton Centre, has been 
awarded a German helmet as a re- 
ward for selling the most Victory 
Bonds in the recent campaign. The 
hoy is a member of Troop 8, Boy 
Scouts, which is connected with the 
Sacred Heart Church. 

The contest which hi* won was in 
the district comprising the Newtons, 
Wellesley, and Needham. Ho sold 58 
bonds ami get^s the helmet, which 
came from Coblenz, Germany. 

This is the second time un honor in 
Liberty l^oun drives bus come to the 
White fumily. When the First Liberty 
Limn drive was on, their daughter, 
Miss Audrey White, then 6 years old, 
bought the first bond on Boston Com 
mon. 


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ANNUITIES 

have certain desirable features 
with reference to Income and In- 
heritance Taxes. 

REFUND ANNUITIES 

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31 Equitable Bldg., Boston 

Please furnish me information 
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Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


Boston Elevated Railway Co. 

SURFACE LINES 
Subject to Change Without Notice 

WATERTOWN STATION TO CENTRAL 
8<|. (Cambridge Subway) — Via Arsenal 
St., 5. OS 6.2*2, 5.37, 5.6*2, 6.00, 7, 8, and 
5 iiilu. to 8.67 A. M., and every 15 min. to 
4.07, 7 and 8 min. to 4.30, every 6 min. 
to 6. 2*2, every 16 min. to 11.52 P. M., 12.08 
A. M. SUNDAY 0.25, 20 min. to 8.05 A. 
M., and each 15 inlnutea to 11.62,, 12.08 
A. M. 

WATERTOWN STATION TO NORTH 
(AM ItKI IX. i: (Via Harvard Sq.)— 5.04, 
5.30, 5.45, 5.55, 6.05, 6.15, 6.22, 6.30, 6.39 
6.47, 6.55. 7.03, 7.11, 7.17 A. M., and each 
5 and 6 min. to 11.39, 11.46, 11.53, 11.59 
P. M., 12.05, 12.14, 12.24, 12.30, 12.51, 12.67, 
1.22 A. M. SUNDAY 5.30. 6.06, each 16 
minutes to 7.06, 7.17, 7.32, 7.47, 8.01. 8.16, 
8.25, and each 7 and 8 min. to 11.54 A. M., 
every 6 min, to 11.00 P. M.. 7 and 8 min. 
to 1 1.30, 11.39, 11.47, 11.53, 12.05, 12.14, 

12.24, 12.30, 12.51, 12.57, 1.22 night. 

NIGHT AND EARLY MORNING SERVICE. 
Newton to Adams Sq. and Dudley St., via 
Mt. Auburn (by transfer at Harvard Sq. ) 
12.12, 1.41, 2.41, 3.41, 4.41 A. M. Return 
take Harvard Sq. car leaving Adams Sq. 
12.35, 1.06, 1.35, 2.36, 3.35, 4.36 A. M. 

Take Harvard Sq. car at Dudley St., 1.39, 
2 39 3.39 4.39. 

CAMBRIDGE SUBWAY TRAINS. From 
Hurvurd Sq.. 5.24 A. M„ to 11.61 night. 
From Uroadwuy, 5.34 A. M., to 11.54 night. 
SUNDAY, 6.04 A. M„ to 11.54 night. 

May 17. 1919. 

KDWAKD DANA, 
Supt. of Transportation. 


GO 1*LE Y REPERTORY THEATRE 
— "Are You a Mason?" one of the 
moat popular farces of the current 
theatrical era, will be acted at the 
Copley Repertory Theatre next week. 
Its story recounts the troubles of an 
elderly gentleman and his son-in-law. 
In order to account to their wives for 
their frequent absences from home, 
they claim that they are Masons, and 
that they are in constant attendance 
at lodge meetings. This offers plenty 
of opportunity for farcical situations 
and dialogue. And when to these is 
added a comedy element similar to 
that in “Charley’s Aunt,” with one of 
the characters masquerading in fem- 
inine garb, it is apparent that there 
is ample opportunity for a farce that 
is productive of continuous uproari- 
ous laughter. 



WEDDING GIFTS 
In 

GuuraiitciMl Silver Flute 
Casseroles— Baking Dishes 

>■41 SUMMER ST. BOSTON 


Notice Is Hereby Given, that the 
subscriber has been duly appointed 
administratrix of the estate of Dora 
W. Sullivan late of Newton in the 
County of Middlesex, deceased, intes- 
tate, and has taken upon herself that 
trust by giving bond, as the law di- 
rects. All persons having demands 
upon the estate of said deceased are 
required to exhibit the same; and all 
persons indebted to said estate are 
called upon to make payment to 

MAUD S. SMITH, Admx. 

(Address) 

18 Rockland Ave., Brockton, Mass, 
or care H. H. Richardson, Atty., 
Stoneham, Mass. 

May 20, 1919. 


To all persons interested in the estate 
of Ellen M. Francis late of Newton 
in said County, deceased: 
WHEREAS, George R. Brackett the 
executor of the will of said deceased, 
has presented for allowance, the ac- 
count of his administration upon the 
estate of said deceased: 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge In said County, on the sixteenth 
day of June A. D. 1919, at nine 
o'clock in the forenoon, to show cause, 
if any you have, why the same should 
not be allowed. 

And said executor is ordered to serve 
this citation by delivering a copy there- 
of to all persons interested in the es- 
tate fourteen days at least before said 
Court, or by publishing the same once 
in each week, for three successive 
weeks, in the Newton Graphic a news- 
paper published in Newton the last 
publication to be one day at least be- 
fore said Court, and by mailing, post- 
paid, a copy of this citation to all 
known persons interested In the es- 
tate seven days at least before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-third day of May in the year 
one thousand nine hundred and nine- 
teen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
May 30-June 6-13. 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
.Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the devisees, legatees, and all 
other persons interested in the es- 
tate of Winfield S. Hutchinson late 
of Newton in said County, deceased, 
testate: 

WHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration with the will an- 
nexed, on the estate of said deceased 
not already administered, to Howard 
K. Brown of Framingham in the 
County of Middlesex, or to some other 
suitable person. 

You are hereby cited to appear at 
a Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge, in said County of Middlesex, 
on the ninth day of June A. D. 1919, 
at nine o’clock in the forenoon, to 
show cause, if any you have, why the 
same should not he granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the last publication 
to be one day, at least, before said 
Court, and by mailing post-paid, or 
delivering a copy of this citation to 
all devisees and legatees named in 
said will, seven days at least before 
said Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
seventeenth day of May in the year 
one thousand nine hundred and nine- 
teen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
May 23-30-June « 


Notice Is Hereby Given, that the 
subscriber has been duly appointed ad- 
ministrator of the estate of Patrick J. 
Doyle late of Newton in the County of 
Middlesex, deceased, intestate, and has 
taken upon himself that trust by giv- 
ing bond, as the law directs. All per- 
sons having demands upon the estate 
of said deceased are required to exhibit 
the same; and all persons indebted to 
said estate are called upon to make 
payment to 

ELWOOD A. HOWE, Adm. 
(Address) 

105 Harvard St., Newton, Mass. 

May 21st, 1919. 

May 30-June 6-13. 


FM^ KEN N EY 6 WATERBURYCO 



: . qMMMJiEVnUI 






TIIE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 6, 1»I». 


9 

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Latest style watches for young men, Waltham, Elgin, 
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Also Expert Delco Service 

WE HAVE THE BEST FORCE OF REPAIR MEN 
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Newton Centre Garage 

NORMAN APPLEYARD, Manager 
792 BEACON STREET 


Newton ville 

— Children’s Day at the Central 
hurch will take place on June 15th. 
— Mr. William Hackett is visiting 
is mother, Mrs. li. B. Hackett of 
ighland avenue. 

— Dr. George H. Talbot and Mrs. Tal- 
t attended the Dedication of the Bay 
the Cloisters at Valley Forge on 
emorial Day. 

-Mr. Edward J. Cox of Brooks ave- 
ue has returned from a vacation of a 
car and a half in California, which 
us greatly beneficial to his health. 

— Mr. George F. Schrafft of Kirkstall 
ad has purchased the land used by 
e Newton Golf club on Centre and 
ill streets and will soon build a 
andsome residence. 


MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL 
ESTATE 


By virtue of the power of sale con- 
ined in a certain mortgage deed 
iven by Patrick L. O’Leary to A. 
lexander Acborn, dated February 
5th, 1909, and recorded with Middle- 
ex (So. Dist.) Deeds, Book 3434, Page 
62, for breach of the conditions con- 
ined in said mortgage, and for the 
tirpose of foreclosing the same, will 
e sold at public auction, upon the 
remises described in said mortgage, 
n Saturday, June 28th, 1919, at two 
’clock in the afternoon, all and sin- 
lar the premises described in said 
'.TBtgage, viz.: A ceftain parcel of 
nd with the buildings thereon situ- 
ted In Newton in the County of Mid- 
lekex and Commonwealth of Massa- 
husetts being lot numbered Tweiity- 
ne on a plan of ‘‘Building Lots on 
alnut Hill, Newton, Mass.,” dated 
uly 1906. to be recorded with Middle- 
ex (South District) Deeds and bound- 
d as follows: — 

Westerly by Walnut Hill Road sev- 
nty-flve feet; Northerly by lot num- 
ered Twenty on said plan one hun- 
red thirty-three and 49-100 feet; 
asterly by lot numbered Twenty-two 
n said plan seventy-live feet; Soutli- 
rly by Parker Avenue one hundred 
hirty-three and 49-100 feet. Contain- 
ing ninety-nine hundred and eighty 
quare feet. Said premises will be 
ohveyed subject to the taxes assessed 
s of April 1, 1919, and to municipal 
lens and assessments, if any. 

One hundred dollars will be re- 
uired to be paid in cash by the pur- 
haser at the time and place of sale; 
Alter terms at sale. 

A. ALEXANDER ACHORN, 
Mortgagee. 

8 Treraont St., Boston. 

*m. 917. 
une 6-13-20. 


MORTGAGEES SALE OF REAL 
ESTATE 


By virtue of the power of sale con- 
tained in a certain mortgage deed 
iven by William Dennis Murphy to 
. Alexander Achorn, dated March 
8th, 1909, and recorded with Middle- 
ex (So. Dist.) Deeds, Book 3432, page 
9Q5, for breach of the conditions con- 
tained in said mortgage, and for the 
jprpose of foreclosing the same, will 
be sold at public auction, upon the 
premises described in said mortgage, 
~n Saturday, June 28th, 1919, at two- 
hirty o’clock in the afternoon, all 
md singular the premises described 
rt said mortgage, viz.: A certain par- 
del of land with tlio buildings thereon 
situated in Newton in the County of 
Middlesex and Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts being lot numbered six 
a ‘‘Plan of Building Lots Walnut 
Hill, Newton Mass.” dated July 1906 
td bo recorded with Middlesex Deeds, 
bounded as follows:— Westerly by 
Walnut Hill Road one hundred twenty 
and 20-100 feet; Northerly by Boyl- 
ston Street aeventy-flvo feet; easterly 
by lot numbered Five on said Plan 
one hundred twenty and 20-100 feet, 
und Southerly by lot numbered Seven 
on said plan seventy-five feet. Con- 
taining eighty-nine hundred and 
eighty-four square feet. Being the 
Bumo premises convoyed to said Wil- 
liam Dennis Murphy by the said A. 
Alexander Achorn ot al by deed dated 
March 18th, 1909, and recorded in said 
deeds and being hereby convoyed' to- 
gether with the right of drainage and 
subject to the right to muintuin drain 
mentioned therein. Said premises 
■will be sold subject to the taxes as- 
sessed as of April 1, 1919, and to 
municipal liens und assessments, if 
any. 

, One hundred dollars will be re- 
cfuired to be paid in cash by tlio pur- 
chaser at the time and pluco of sale; 
other terms at sulo. 

A. ALEXANDER ACHORN, 
Mortgagee. 

18 Tromont St., Boston. 

Rm. 917. 
t jkine 6-13-20. 


Newton ville 

— Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Cram have gone 
to Rockport, Mass., for the summer. 

— Mr. and Mrs. j. E. Cornish and 
family of Prescott street are at Hyan- 
nisport, Mass., for the summer. 

— Messrs. J. Aug. Remington of Otis 
park and H. P. Patey of Grove hill 
were drawn on the jury Monday night. 

— On Thursday evening at the Meth- 
odist Church there was a Mothers’ and 
Daughters’ Banquet. About 150 were 
present. 

— Children’s Day will be observed 
next Sunday morning by the Univer- 
salist Church in place of the regular 
service. The closing Sunday will be 
the fourth Sunday in June. 

— Mrs. Richard T. Loring has just 
returned from a visit to Duxbury 
where she has a summer home. Her 
son who is recovering from an opera- 
tion will remain for rest and recuper- 
ation. 

— 'Mrs. William A. Kemper (May 
Constance Richardson) and two sons 
from Butte, Montana, are visiting her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. William C. 
Richardson of Highland avenue for the 
summer. 

— The retired ministers of the New 
England Conference held their annual 
meeting in the vestry of the Methodist 
Church on Wednesday. The ministers 
took charge of the mid-week prayer 
meeting. 

— The Rev. John Goddard of the 
Church of the New Jerusalem has gone 
to his country home at Monument 
Beach for a two weeks’ rest. During 
his absence, the Rev. L. M. L. Gould 
will take his place. 

— The Children’s Day Service of the 
Methodist Church will be held Sunday 
at 6 P. M. It will take the place of the 
regular Sunday evening service. There 
will be recitations and singing by the 
children, and flowers will be distrib- 
uted to all the children of the Sunday- 
School. 


SILK 


0LEPR00F 

=HOSE= 


W E are pleased to 
announce that the 
arrival yesterday 
of a second very 
large shipment of Silk Hole- 
proof Hose puts us again in 
position to fill all orders 
from this extremely popular 
brand. 

This big assortment in- 
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Mouse, Gray, Taupe, African 
Brown and Cordovan shades 
in hemmed top and full 
fashioned styles for women, 
and the same colors in 
smooth fitting styles for 
men. 

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FOR WOMEN 

(3 Pairs in a Box) 

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Full Fashioned $6.75 

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Silk $2.55 

Extra Heavy $3.30 

Assortments Also for Boys and Girls. 
Delivery Paid In New England. 

TALBOT CO. 

395-403 Washington St. 
BOSTON 


List Your 

REAL ESTATE 

with 

J. Edward Gallanan 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 
AUCTIONEER 
271 WASHINGTON STREET 
NEWTON 


SCHOOL NOTES 


Technical High School 


Memorial day was celebrated last 
Thursday by two entertainments, so 
that all the school might enjoy at 
least one of them. Wednesday after- 
noon Miss Flske’s class of Junior 
girls gave a most Interesting pro- 
gram. Beatrice Wilson, as chairman, 
introduced the speakers, who recited 
poems in honor of the holiday itself, 
In interpretation of the relation be- 
tween the North and South, and in 
appreciation of our fallen soldiers in 
the great war. The usual attention 
of the large audience testified to the 
, excellence uf the selections and the 
charming sympathy of their inter- 
pretation. The program closed with 
the singing of national hymns, led by 
Mr. Harrington, and accompanied by 
the class orchestra. 

Thursday morning two of the Alum- 
ni, Richard Wentworth, 1914, and 
Eliot Stickney, 1915, spoke to the 
school. Though there was no one who 
did not miss the Grand Army men, 
the brief, manly speeches of the young 
"veterans’ was an inspiration that 
will long be felt. 

Tuesday and Wednesday, June 3 and 
4, there will be held important spell- 
ing and punctuation tests for Fresh- 
men and Sophomores. Failure to 
pass in these tests may mean a failure 
in English. There will be a first and 
second prize awarded to the Fresh- 
men and Sophomores who do best in 
these examinations. 

The last dance of the season given 
by the Seniors was held in the li- 
brary, May 16. A very interesting 
afternoon was planned and carried 
out. The committee in charge con- 
sisted of Leslie McNeil, Sadie Gold- 
rick, and Alice McBride. 

Margaret Mutch, 1915, a Junior at 
Radcliffe, has become a member of 
the Phi Beta Kappa Society. It is an 
unusual honor to be chosen a member 
of this society during the third year 
of college. 

Sheldon Root, 1915, obtained the 
Croix de Geurre for remarkable cour- 
age while in the French air service. 
His plane was set afire when an in- 
cindiary bullet struck one of its 
wings. Without any hesitation Root 
climbed out on the wing and ex- 
tinguished the blaze. * This at a 
height of five thousand feet, required 
some nerve, — and he had it. 

During the past two weeks, a few 
Junior girls have spent their after- 
noons working at the Draft Board in 
West Newton. They rolled up and 
sent out over 3000 certificates for the 
soldiers, sailors, and Red Cross nurses 
of Newton. Among those who volun- 
teered to assist in this work were 
Agnes Dumas, Dorothy Greenwood, 
Edna Tuttle, Gertrude Priest, Pearl 
White (not the movie actress), and 
Alice Taffe. The Boy Scouts of New- 
ton are now delivering them in the 
different wards. 


Newton Vocational School 


The speaker at the Memorial Day 
exercises was Major Frank Piper of 
the 26th Division, 101st Regiment. 
Major Piper gave many interesting 
stories in describing his work in con- 
nection with the medical corps of the 
A. E. F. and held the closest attention 
of his audience by his word pictures 
of the gallant conduct of the American 
forces at Chateau-Thierry and other 
places in which they outwitted and 
conquered the Huns. 

It is hoped that there will be a 
large number of mothers present at 
the exercises to be given Mothers’ 
Day, June 4th. A play will be pre- 
sented by the Junior Class and there 
will be recitations and music in the 
hall. Refreshments will be served. 


Burr School 


The Memorial Exercises of the C. 
C. Burr and Williams Schools took an 
unusual form this year. The pupils 
of grades 4-8 met in the school hall 
on Wednesday to greet the members 
of the G. A. R. and the returned he- 
roes of this present war. There ivere 
songs and recitations. At the suges- 
tion of the G. A. R. the speaking was 
given to the heroes of the present 
war, former members of the school. 
Commander James Reid of the G. A. 
R. introduced Lieut. Felix Randlett 
of the 2d division, and Private George 
Fiske and Corporal Roland Allen of 
the YD. who gave most interesting 
accounts of their experiences in 
France. The program concluded with 
the singing of original war songs by 
Commander Reid. 


Horace Mann School 


The Achievement Club held a meet- 
ing on Friday. The Program Com- 
mittee had charge of the meeting and 
Mr. Swett gave an interesting talk. 

The Horace Mann nine defeated the 
Mason nine; score 5-2. 

On account of the hot weather there 
was only one session of school on Wed- 
nesday. 

llydc School 


On Tuesday morning people in 
Newton saw a procession of automo- 
biles passing filled with happy, laugh- 
ing children. Where were they going? 
What did it all mean? 

They were Miss Green’s and Miss 
Sampson’s pupils in the fourth grade 
of the Hyde School on their annual 
trip studying the geography of New- 
ton, under the leadership of Miss 
Bragg, Assistant Superintendent of 
Schools. 

This form of teaching geography 
was introduced by Miss Bragg as a 
means of visualizing the cluss-room 
study. 

When Mr. Miller calls for automo- 
biles in Nowton Highlands, so great 
is the co-operation of the parents that 
there are always more cars offered than 
are needod. Fathers stay homo from 
business and mothers come — glad to 
work witli the schools in giving the 
children the pleasure and tlio op- 
portunity of such a trip. 

To the children the hills of Now- 
ton — Institution IIlll whoro thoy 
"muko Baptist ministers;” Waban 
Hill, the highest of them all; Nonan- 
tuitt Hill, Mt. Ida, W c s t Nowton 1 till 
aro all more than uumes because thoy 
have soon them. 

Crystal Lake, Bullough’s Pond, Sil- 
ver Lake are now a part of the child’s 
experience. Thoy know about tlio John 



[OOOl 


lOE 


I IN T 

$3000 to $25,000 

Ready for Occupancy in September 

8 TO 14 ROOMS— 1 TO 5 BATHS 
GARAGE FOR 1 TO 8 CARS 
BUILT OF BRICK, SIDING, OR 
STUCCO 


We build to your order on any of our 
Newton estates. We are prepared to 
build very close to pre-war price*. Let 
us show you. 


NEWTONS 


Make your selection now — First 
because the locations are limited; 
second because we must start your 
house now for occupancy in Sep- 
tember. 

Tho lots are priced from $1000 up. 
Located on — 

Commonwealth At. 

Chestnut St 
Howland Rd. 

Grove Hill At. 

Rullough Park 
In Waban 

West Newton 
NewtoaTiUe 


60 STATE STREET 


Tel. Main 5305 
[Ol 


Eliot Memorial where John Eliot 
preached to the Indians; about 
Echo Bridge over the Charles River 
at Newton Upper Falls, where they 
all tried their voices; and Quinobe- 
quin road, where they rested in the 
cool shade by the side of the river. 

They saw the Silver Lake Cordage 
Factory, the Gamewell Fire Alarm 
Co., and the Saco-Lowell Machine 
Shop, and other interesting places 
where things are made. 

At frequent intervals the cars 
halted and at the signal "All out” the 
children gathered about Miss Bragg, 
who talked about these points of in- 
terest. 

The parents and friends who shared 
in the trip and who made it possible 
expressed themselves as delighted 
with the new Newton with which they 
had become acquainted and the chil- 
dren came home more than ever the 
proud possessors of their beautiful 
city. 

The Hyde baseball team has played 
and won six games thus far during 
its season. 

The patriotic song medley given on 
Memorial Day by the seventh and 
eighth girls under the direction of 
Miss Leydon will be repeated at the 
welcome home exercises for Newton 
Highlands boys on June 17th. The 
flag drill by sixth grade girls will also 
be repeated. 

The spring number of the "Blue- 
bird" issued by Mrs. Blakemore’s di- 
vision of the sixth grade is out this 
week, edited by Mildred MacDonald. 


LASELL NOTES 


Commencement exercises at Lasell 
Seminary. Auburndale, opened Satur- 
day afternoon with the annual May 
fete, presented on the school campus. 
The spectacle was elaborate, includ- 
ing a pageant and an exhibition of 
folk dances, besides the coronation of 
the queen of May. Hundreds of spec- 
tators viewed the exercises from the 
green slopes of the natural ampithea- 
tre. 

Miss Ethel Ramage of St. Johns- 
bury, Vt., vice-president of the senior 
class, was chosen queen of May, the 
highest honor that can be bestowed 
upon a student at the seminary. The 
queen is chosen by secret balloting, 
the result of which is not announced 
until the ceremonies take place. Miss 
Catherine Rice of Indianapolis, a 
member of the junior class, was se- 
lected as the queen’s maid of honor. 

The queen was crowned by Miss 
Priscilla Alden of North Weymouth, 
the senior class president. Barbara 
and Frances Sprague. 6-year-old twin 
sisters, pupils at the Woodland School, 
were flower girls. After the queen 
had been crowned the students 
marched to the throne by classes and 
sang their class songs. 

A May pole dance, following the 
coronation, was a brilliant event. 
Each girl wore a sweater matching 
the color of the ribbon she carried 
during the dance and the color com- 
bination was striking. An exhibition 
of various folk dances was then given 
and among the students who inter- 
preted Spanish dances was Miss Maria 
Cabrera, daughter of the Mexican 
minister of finance. 

A pageant depicting a romance 
during the early days of France was 
presented under the direction of 
Miss LeRoyer, a teacher of French 
at the seminary. The members of the 
cast were attired in French costume, 
and other girls in the same attire sold 
May baskets for the benefit of the 
French children whose fathers were 
killed in the war. 

The program for Commencement at 
Lasell is as follows: 

Saturday. May 31. May Fete; Satur- 
day, June 7. 8 P. M., Glee Club Con- 
cert; Monday, June 9, 10 A. M., River 
Day; Tuesday, Juno 10, 3.30 P. M., 
the June Revelry by the students of 
Woodland Park; Wednesday, June 11. 
8 P. M., Commencement Concert; 
Thursday, June 12, 2.30-3 P. M . 

Swimming Exhibition; from 3 to 5.30. 
Art Exhibit Studio, and the Homo 
Economics Exhibit in Carter Hall; 
Saturday, June 14. 8 P. M„ Senior Re- 
ception; Sunday. Juno 15. 10.45 A. M.. 
Sermon before the Graduating Class 
by the Rev. Jay Thomas Stocking, D. 
D.; 6.15 P. M., Commencement Ves- 
pers by the Rev. Arthur W. Moulton; 
Monday. June 16, S P. M„ Class Day 
Exercises; Tuesday, June 17, 10.45 A. 
M., Commencement Exercises address 



WEDDING GIFTS 
III 

Silver and Flit (Hass 
Lowest Prices Always 
T*41 SUMMER ST UOSTON^ 


by Congressman Robert Luce; 2 P. 
M., Reunion of the Alumnae and form- 
er students. 


Country Day School 

The graduation exercises at the 
Country Day School will be held at 
the school Thursday afternoon, June 
12. The speaker will be Dr. John C. 
Ferguson, confidential advisor to the 
President of China, who is the father 
of Blair Ferguson, one of the seniors 
who will receive diplomas. No formal 
invitations are to be sent out to the 
exercises, but a general invitation is 
issued to parents and friends of the 
school. 

The annual public concert of the 
Glee Club will be given at the school 
at 8.15 Wednesday evening, June 11. 
A special quartet from the Glee Club 
is to sing at the graduation exercises. 
It will comprise Morgan H. Harris of 
Chestnut Hill, first tenor: Edwin S. 
Webster, Jr., of Chestnut Hill, second 
tenor; Francis Fiske of Needham, 
first bass; and Charles Pearson of 
Newton, second bass. 

The Science Club at its annual elec- 
tion selected Robert E. Sumner of 
Boston as president, Wallace G. Soule 
of Newton, vice president. John D. 
Houghton of Chestnut Hill, secretary, 
and Daniel S. Low of Brookline, treas- 
urer. 

The Mandolin Club has chosen 
Morgan H. Harris of Chestnut Hill 
to be its next year’s leader, and Hen- 
ry N. Pratt of West Newton to be 
manager. 


DEATH OF MIL BOSSON 


Mr. William B. Bosson, for over 
forty years a resident of thi3 city, 
was drowned in Lake Winnepesaukee, 
N. H., last Monday afternoon. Mr. 
Bosson was spending the summer 
with his son, Mr. H. Stewart Bosson 
of Meredith, N. H., and had been out 
in the lake fishing. One of the neigh- 
bors noticed the boat drifting about 
and notified Mr. Stewart Bosson and 
subsequently the body was found ly- 
ing in a few feet of water quite near 
the shore. It is thought that Mr. 
Bosson, who has not been in his usual 
health for sometime, sustained a 
stroke of apoplexy while paddling the 
boat homeward, and fell into the 
water. 

Mr. Bosson was born in Chelsea and 
was 66 years of age. For many years 
he was private secretary for the Fay- 
estate, but retired from active busi- 
ness some years ago. He made his 
winter home with his daughter. Mrs. j 
Samuel N. Fleming in West Newton, 
and spent his summers at Meredith. | 
N. H. Besides Mr. Stewart Bosson i 
and Mrs. Fleming, he is survived by , 
another son, Mr. William B. Bosson. } 
Jr., of Zuni, New Mexico. He is a 
brother of ex-alderman Edward P. 
Bosson of Newton Centre. 

Funeral services were held yester- 
day afternoon at the residence of Mrs. 
Fleming on Hillside avenue, West 
Newton. Rev. Julian C. Jaynes of the 
Unitarian Church officiated and the in- 
terment was at the Newton Cemetery. 


NEWTON WINS MEET 


A track meet of suburban Y. M. C. 
A.’s was held last week Friday morn- 
ing on the Newton Y. M. C. A. track. 
The Newton Y. won with 34 points, 
Somerville second with 22 points, 
Malden 20. and Cambridge 4. A new 
Y. M. C. A. record was made in the 
running broad jump hv Dempsey of 
Malden, who jumped 22 feet 1 3-4 in. J 
Dempsey also scored the highest in- 
dividual average of 11 points. Robert- 
son of Somerville second, with 10, and 
Carlson of Newton third, with S. 

100-Yard Dash— Won by Dempsey. 
Malden; Smith. Somerville, second; 
Palmer, Newton, third. Time, 10 
3-5s. 

220-Yard Dash— Won by Carlson, 
Newton; Burrell, Malden, second; 1 
Smith, Somerville, third. Time 25 

3- 5s. 

440-Yard Run— Won by Robertson. 
Somerville; Wilson, Newton, second; 
Palmer, Newton, third. Time 55 2-5s. 

880- Yard Run — Won by Robertson, 
Somervillo; Wilson. Newton, second; 
Smith, Malden, third. Time, 2m 12s. 

Mile Run Won by Unwin. Newton; 
Morrison. Cambridge, second; Brim- 
blecom, Newton, third. Time, Sm 14 

4- 5s. 

High Jump — Won by Hiatt. Malden, 
Brimblecoiu. Newton, second; Demp- 
sey. Malden, third. Height, 5ft. 3 in. ; 

Broad Jump— Won by Dempsey, j 
Malden; Carlson, Newton, second; ; 
Hudd, Newton, third. Distance, 22ft. j 
13-4 in. 

12-Pound Shotput— Won by Dent, j 
Newton; Brown. Somerville, second; 
Peterson, Cambridge, third. Distance, j 
39ft. lOin. 

300-Yurd Relay- Won by Somer- 
ville. Time, 2iu 20 3-5s. 


West Newton 


— Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Felton of High- 
land avenue have gone to Barre, Mass. 

— Mrs. F. W. Seaver of Temple street 
has gone to her summer home at Wil- 
liamsburg. Mass. 

— Saturday night a dinner and dance 
will be held at Brae Burn for the 
members of. the club. 

— The Lincoln Park Baptist Church 
will have Children’s Day Services next 
Sunday at the morning hour of service. 

— Mr. Douglas D. Furbush, who has ; 
been visiting his father on Davis ave- 
nue left last week Thursday for Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

— Today Mrs. John S. White of 103 
Waban avenue. Waban, is giving a 
luncheon and whist at Brae Burn to 
about 30 friends. 

— The extra supplies for the West 
Newton Branch of the Red Cross for 
the summer months will be at Mrs. 
Geo. P. Hatch. Putnam street, for 
June; Mrs. B. J. Bowen. Hillside ter- 
race. for July; and at Miss Edith B. 
Wadsworth, Highland avenue, for Au- 
gust. All finished work may be left 
at the same address. 

— The entire Waltham Colonial Sing- 1 
ing Orchestra of twenty pieces will fur- j 
nish the music for the Tea Dansant at ! 
the Brae Burn Country Club next Sat- 
urday afternoon. This same organiza- 
tion for the past ten years under the 
management of Mr. Howard Everett 
Cole of this city, has also been en- ; 
gaged for the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ re- ■ 
ception at the Newton Armory tomor-l 
row evening. 

— Mr. Arthur E. Pearson of Otis and | 
Chestnut streets. West Newton, had as j 
his guests a party of twenty-five at the i 
Dedication of the New Hampshire Bay j 
in the Cloisters of the Chapel at Valley 
Forge, Pennsylvania, on Memorial Day. 
In the evening Mr. Pearson and Miss 
Pearson gave a dinner at The Bellevue- 
Stratford in Philadelphia to the Rt. 
Rev. Thomas J. Garland, D.D.. Bishop 
Suffragan of the Diocese of Pennsyl- 
vania and Mrs. Garland, and to the 
Dedication Party. 


Lower Falls 


— Mr. George E. Goodwin of Ather- 
ton place left May 30th. for a vacation 
trip and will vi*slt Philadelphia. Chi- 
cago. and St. Paul. Minn. .where he 
will be the guest of his cousin. Mr. Wil- 
liam C. Evan*, who when a boy was a 
resident of Newton. Mr. Goodwin ex- 
pects to be away three weeks. 


ALHlMmiNaKANCE 

AT cost 

• "Miy Pay 'More • 

Massachusetts Mutual Au t a Ins. Ca 
Automobile Mutual Liability Ins. Ca 
40 Central Street* Boston 

LEONA’S 

HOME-MADE CANDIES 

1256 WASHINGTON STREET 
WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Tel. Nenrten West 1256- K 
CHOCOLATES AND BON-BONS 
Made Fresh Every Day 
lee Freum Served Also 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin. and 
all other persons interested in the j 
estate of Louis N. Lupieu late of ' 
Newton in said County, deceased. 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will and tes - 1 
lament of said deceased has been pre- 1 
seated to said Court, for Probate, by 
Clara E. Lupieu who prays that letters 
testamentary may be issued to her, 
the executrix therein named, without 
giving a surety on her official bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, on 
the twenty-fifth day of June A. D. 
1919, at nine o'clock in the forenoon, 
to show cause, if any you have, why 
the same should not be granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby di- 
rected to give public notice thereof, 
by publishing ibis citation once in j 
each week for three successive weeks, | 
in the Newton Graphic a newspaper 
published in Newtou the last publi- 
cation to bo one day. at least, before 
said Court, and by mailing postpaid, 
or deliveriug a copy of this citation to j 
all kuowu persons interested in the 
estate, seven days at least before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
third day of Juno in the year one 
thousand nine hundred und uineteou. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

June 6-13-20 



INSURANCE 

AUTOMOBILE 

FIRE 

ACCIDENT 

HEALTH and 
LIFE 

HERBERT GALLAGHER 

99 Park St., Newton, Mass. 

TeL Newton North 14 


NEWTON REAL ESTATE ^ 


ALVORD BROS. 

(Established 35 years) 

Main Office, 79 Milk St.. Bo* Con. Maas. 
Local Office, opp. Newton Centre Depet 

We solicit the llstlnc of all Newton 
land and housea for sale or to let 


INSURANCE AUCTIONEERS 
EXPERT APPRAISERS 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, s*k 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Abby Temple Poole late 
of Newton in said County, deceased. 
WHEREAS, a ♦ certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will and tes- 
tament of said deceased has been pre- 
sented to said Court, for Probate, by 
Norman Farquhar who prays that let- 
ters testamentary may be issued to 
him. the executor therein named, 
without giving a surety on his official 
bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, on 
the thirtieth day of June A. D. 1919, 
at nine o’clock in the forenoon, to 
show cause, if any you have, why the 
same should not be granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby di- 
rected to give public notice thereof, 
by publishing this citation once in 
each week, for three successive 
weeks, in the Newton Graphic a news- 
paper published in Newton the last 
publication to be one day, at least, 
before said Court, and by mailing 
postpaid, or delivering a copy of this 
citation to all known persons inter- 
ested in the estate, seven days at least 
before said Court 

Witness, Charles J. Melntire, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
third day of June iu the year one 
thousand nine hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

June 6-13-20. 


Commonwealth of Massaehuetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law. next of kin, credh 
itors, and all other persons inter- 
ested in the estate of Edgar Francis 
Eames late of Newton iu said Coun- 
ty. deceased, intestate. 

WHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration on the estate of said 
deceased to Elbridge John Eames of 
Newton in the County of. Middlesex, 
without giving a surety on his bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge. in said County of Middlesex, 
on the twenty-third day of June A. D. 
1919. at niue o’clock in the forenoon, 
to show cause if . any you have, why 
the same should not be granted. 

And the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for thr^e successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graph per pub- 

j libhed in Newton the la.>*. publication 
to be one day, at least, before said 
Court. 

witness, Charles J. Mdutlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
second day of Juno in tho year oua 
thousand nine hundred and uiueteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
June 6-13-20. 

It Pavs to Advertise 


i 



10 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE #, 191#. 


P. P. ADAMS' BIG DEPARTMENT STORE, WALTHAM 

June Sale 

. WARM WEATHER 

WASH GOODS 

INDIAN HEAD WEEK 

WHITE INDIAN HEAD COTTON 

Widely used this season as a substitute for linen. 
Special values here at each price — 

33-inch . . . 35c yd 36-inch . . . 39c yd 45-inch . . . 49c yd 
VOILES AT 20c YARD 

New Leader Voiles, Floral Patterns on Tinted Ground 

20c yd 

BURTON RECEPTION VOILE 49c yd 

“SUBLIME” VOILE 75c yd 

BATES GINGHAMS 

Fast Colors. 27-inch in Plaids and Plain Colors. New 
lot today 29c yd 

36-INCH PROMENADE SUITING 50c yd 

HUCK TOWELS 

30-dozen good buck towels with red border... 19c each 

BLEACHED TURKISH TOWELS 

Jacquard border in Red, Blue and Pink 33c 

RUSSIA CRASH 

Part linen weft. Bleached 22c yd 

JAPANESE CLOTH 

500-yards. 36-inch. White 29c yd 

30-INCH WHITE CAMBRIC 

For Children’s Wear 15c yd 


LEGAL STAMPS 


FREE DELIVERY 


P. P. ADAMS’ 

Big Department Store 

133-139 Moody Street Waltham 


EXCELLENT ENTERTAINMENT 


real estate 


Edmands and Byfleld, John Han- 
cock Building report the sale of the 
property No. 149 Cabot street, New- 
ton, for Henrietta C. Everson of 
Providence, R. I. to M. W. Murray of 
Newton, who buys for a home. Prop- 
erty consists of dwelling and 15,000 
square feet of land, all valued at 
$6500. 


■TOE FOUNDATION,,] 

OF OUR SUCCESS ' ( [5n w ’ a , 

Satisfied 

PATRONS/ 


.SATIS 


The "satisfaction guaranteed” to be 
found in this shop doesn’t cost you 
any money, but it is your protection 
against the purchase of any inferior 
food stuffs. All of our meats must 
come up to the quality qualification 
and be in a prime, choice condition be- 
fore they find their way across our 
counter. 

SPECIAL FOR SATURDAY 
Rump Steak 50c a lb 

WASHINGTON PUBLIC MARKET 

244 Washington St„ Newton 
Next Door to Ginter’s 
CHOICE MEAT, POULTRY and FISH 
Telephone V. N. 2710 

Orders Delivered Twice Daily 


CHESTNUT HILL HORSE SHOW 


The annual Horse show at the 
Chestnut Hill club on Memorial Day 
was a huge success, both in the num- 
ber of entries and the attendance. 
General Edward* was a delighted 
guest and his handsome grey horse 
was one of the features of the show. 

The Liggett stables carried off the 
largest number of ribbons, winning 
25 in all. 9 firsts, 8 seconds, and 8 
thirds. Lady Betty, alone winning 
four ribbons. Both Miss Lorraine 
Liggett and Miss Janice Liggett had 
narrow escapes from serious injuries. 
Miss Janice Liggett being thrown 
twice. Miss Gertrude Bradlee was 
also a good winner, with 7 ribbons to 
her credit. 

The judges were William E. Baker, 
Bayard Tuckerman, Jr., J. Sumner 
Draper, and Henry Smith. The com- 
mittee on arrangements included An- 
drew Adie, Prescott Bigelow', Chester 
A. Howe, Francis W. Lee, Louis K. 
Liggett. Richard M. Saltonstall, Wal- 
ter H. Seavey, Edw'in S. Webster, A. 
Winsor Weld, and George S. West. 


SALVATION ARMY DRIVE 

Mr. Horton S. Allen, the treasurer 
of the committee In charge of the 
Newton drive reports this morning 
that there is need of greater w r ork on 
the part of many local committees if 
Newton is to raise its full quota of 
$13,000 as only $10,699 has been re- 
ceived at the present time. 

The villages of Newton. Waban, 
Chetsnut hill and Newton Highlands 
have completed their quotas, and 
work is being continued in all the 
others and subscriptions will still be 
received. 

This is the only drive to date in 
which the city of Newton not 

made its full quota. 


TIRE AND 
SUPPLY CO. 


COPLEY SQUARE 

GUARANTY vs. NO GUARANTY 

The following extract is quoted, word for word, from the guar- 
anty of several of the popular advertised tires: . . Pneumatic auto- 

mobile tires are NOT guaranteed to give any definite miles of serv- 
ice.” In contrast to the foregoing, tires sold by us ARE guaranteed 
to give definite mileage service, except in case of misuse or abuse. 

THINK IT OVER! 

PORTAGE TIRES 

"NONE BETTER MAD»E” 

FABRIC CASINGS ARE GUARANTEED 6000 MILES 
CORD CASINGS ARE GUARANTEED 90Q0 MILES 
Qur sale* of these sturdy, long-life tires are qohstantly increasing 
is volume, and the cost is LESS than that of the so-called standard 
tires which are guaranteed 3500 miles. 

CALL, WRITE OR PHONE FOR QUOTATIONS 

COPLEY SQUARE TIRE AND SUPPLY GO. 

:i SUCCESSORS TO CUT PRICE AUTO SU$*LY 00 

587 Boylston St., Boston 

p Telcphpuc JBu B. .541,. 1500- -- ■ 

OPEN TUESDAY AND SATURDAY" EVENINGS” 


On the beautiful grounds of Mr. and 
Mrs. Samuel W. Bridges on Fairmont 
avenue, a program of unusual interest 
was presented Thursday afternoon by 
the pupils of M ins 1 a* win thul and Miss 
Marey’s School. 

Following the singing of the "Star 
Spangled Banner”, a number of 
French songs were sung and recita 
tlons given by Margaret Nichols, 
Elizabeth SchrafTt, and Doris Bryant. 
The singing was marked by a purity 
of tone and naturalness pleasing to 
hear. 

After the songs and recitations 
came a short one-act play, "The Mirac- 
ulous Pitcher,” in which Helen Moore, 
Hilda Goldthwaite, and Alice Durell 
Iceland took part. This was the 
classic myth of Baud sand Philemon 
who entertain a god unawares. The 
part of old Baucis w’as admirably 
taken by Helen Moore whose apxiety 
over the meagreness of the fare of- 
fered the god seemed very real, while 
the part of the aged Philemon was 
equally well done. 

"Les Confitures" followed. In this 
tw r o pampered children Pierette 
(Kathryn Schrafft) and Pierrot (Doro- 
thy Bridges) are brought to a realiza 
tion of their fortunate circumstances 
by two little mendicants (Phebe Alden 
and Janet McKenzie). The play w'as 
well acted and beautifully spoken. 
Anyone knowing French could follow 
the lines easily. Next came two French 
songs by Natalie Sheldon and Helen 
Bridges. 

During the short intermission ice 
cream was in great demand. The pro- 
ceeds of the entertainment are to go 
to devastated France. 

• Pa,rt 2 opened with a very dainty 
minuet by Janet McKenzie and Ursula 
Holland in charming costumes of col- 
onial times. During the dance which 
was greatly enhanced by the beauty 
of the surroundings, a hidden chorus 
sang. The same chorus sang a selec- 
tion from "Patience’ with Kathryn 
Schrafft as soloist, and two French 
songs. Recitations by Marion Ben- 
bow and Helen Kreider followed. 

During a second intermission peon- 
ies from Mrs. Bridges’ garden were 
sold. 

Next same a scene from that incom- 
parable tale of childhood, “Alice in 
Wonderland.” The Gryphon (Ursula 
Holland) and the Mock Turtle (Doro- 
thy Bridges) told Alice (Phebe Alden) 
of their education, and of their games. 
The costumes of both the Turtle and 
the Gryphon were most realistic. 

The last number on the program 
was "Le Jour de Madame Dubois” in 
which Madame Dubois has a receiving 
day. On this occasion she has been 
accustomed to show off her only child, 
Jeanne. Today, the child overhears 
some very uncomplimentary remarks 
on the part of her mother’s guests and 
refuses to recite much to her mother’s 
consternation. The part of the moth- 
er was taken by Helen Bridges, of the 
child by Hilda Goldthwaite, and of the 
guests by Natalie Sheldon, Helen 
Moore, Alice Durell Loveland and 
Elizabeth Loveland. The part of the 
servant was charmingly done by 
Kathryn Schrafft. As in the earlier 
play, the French was spoken with 
clearness of accent and evident under- 
standing of the meaning. 

The program was greatly enjoyed 
by all who saw it. 


TOMATO PLANTS and 
CABBAGE PLANTS 
Both Early nnd Late Varieties at 
NEWTON ROSE CONSERVATORIES 
R. G- Hridgham, Prop 
32>'Newtnnvllle Avenue 
NewtonvIIlo 

Telephone Newton North 404 


94TH GRADUATION 


The 94th graduation exercises of 
the Newton Theological Institution at 
Newton Centre were held this week, 
beginning with the Baccalaureate ser- 
mon by President George E. Horr, 
D.D., at the First Baptist Church in 
that village on Sunday morning. 

On Wednesday a memorial service 
was held at the Baptist Church as a 
part of the Commencement exercises. 
Rev. O. S. C. Wallace, D.D., made the 
address to the alumni. At 12.30 the 
alumni dinner was served at Bray 
Hall. That evening there was a re- 
ception and tea at Colby Hall and 
at 7.45 an oration delivered by 
Principal Henry T. DeWolfe, D.D. 

Yesterday the exercises were held 
in the Baptist Church. After prayer 
by Rev. Dr. Emory W. Hunt came ad- 
dresses by graduates, “The Church 
and Returning Soldiers,” by Charles 
L. Conrad; ‘The Federated Church,” 
Eugene D. Dolloff; "The Missionary 
Call and the Will of God,” Vernelle W. 
Dyer; "Christianizing Industry," Her- 
bert E. Hinton; "The Way of Faith 
the Path to Peace,” Herbert M. Rock- 
well”; "The Preacher of the Recon- 
struction,” George G. Ward. 

At the close of the addresses Pres. 
George E. Horr presented the diplo- 
mas. The address to the graduates 
was delivered by Prof. Henry K 
Rowe. PhD. 

Following the graduation exercises 
the annual dinner of the trustees was 
served in Bray Hall, Newton Centre, 
and at four o’clock a reception was 
given by President and Mrs. Horr at 
their home to the entire school and 
the alumni, as well as the faculty. 

There were fifteen graduates, and 
eight other seniors are still in the 
service of the United States. 


Auburndale 

— Mrs. H. R. Turner has returned 
from a week’s visit at Allerton. 

— Rev. and Mrs. W. C. Gordon leave 
next week for their summer home at 
South Hero. Vt. 

— Mrs. Clara L. Harrington and Miss 
Sallie Stanton spent the week end at 
Gloucester, Mass. 

— Mrs. George G. Brown and family 
are settled at their bungalow at Aller- 
ton for the summer. 

— The final meeting of the Mothers’ 
Association was held this week at the 
Congregational Chapel. 

— Mrs. Caroline Shepard has sold her 
frame house with garage on Wolcott 
street to Mr. Fred Prior. 

— Mr. W. Franklin Spooner has been 
away for a week’s vacation, and was 
much benefitted by the change. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George H. Haven left 
last week for “Camp Haven,” West 
Gray, Me., for the summer season. 

— Dr. Philip E. Kelly has bought the 
large house No. Ill Islington road, and 
also a large lot of adjoining land and 
will occupy immediately. 

— Mrs. G. A. Drost and Mrs. W. I. 
Goodrich are visiting Mrs. Drost’s 
daughter, Mrs. Frank Wilson, at Con- 
cord, N. H., for two weeks. 

— Mr. Edward A. Legge has sold to 
William J. Benger the house on Cen- 
tral terrace, formerly owned and occu- 
pied by Dr. Clarence J. Blake. 

— The new stage in the Parish Hall 
at the Church of the Messiah was used 
for the first time Tuesday evening, for 
the "District School” entertainment. 

— Mrs. J. Parker B. Fiske and fam- 
ily are at their summer cottage on 
Chebacco Island. Mr. George Fiske 
has returned from France and expects 
to return to college in the Fall. 

— Mrs. Frank H. Palmer announces 
the marriage of her sister. Mrs. Vinal 
S. Heuter to Mr. Herbert B. Vialle of 
Concord, Massachusetts, on Wednes- 
day. the fourth of June, at Groton, 
Massachusetts. 

— Don’t forget the Lawn Party to be 
held on the grounds of the Church of 
the Messiah. Saturday afternoon and 
evening, June 14. The proceeds are 
for the choir boys’ camp fund. Mrs. 
G. W. St. Amant is chairman. 

— Miss Alice M. Clark, formerly a 
resident of Commonwealth avenue and 
well known in this village, was mar- 
ried last evening to Mr. Charles J. 
Berce of Somerville. Mr. and Mrs. 
Berce will reside on Brainbridge 
street, Roxbury. 

— Food from the fresh fields, sleep 
under God’s own pine trees, the com 
panionship of jolly, clean boys, under 
the guidance of refined, educated men, 
these and more at Norse Camp, on the 
Cape. Ovington. Auburndale, Mass., 
phone Newton West 634M. Advt, 

ALLEN SCHOOL GRADUATION 

The Alleh Military School at West 
Newton ended its school year yesterday 
morning when h class of eight was 
graduated. Thes program included an 
address by Rev. William Allen Knight. 
D. D.. of the Brighton Congregational 
Church, piano selections by Miss Eliza- 
beth Siedhoff of the faculty, and the 
awarding of diplomas and prizes by the 
principal, Rey. Thomas Chalmers, D.D. 

The pupils paraded in battalion re- 
view. under the direction of Captain 
L. J. Costello, cadet commandant of 
the school. They also went through 
the manual of arms and then marched 
back to the campus and grouped them- 
selves about the ’flagstaff while Dr. 
Chalmers made the awards, as follows: 

For the most distinguished service 
to the school, ’Cadet Major Harold 
Hickman of Manchester, N. H.; for 
highest average In scholarship and 
athletics combined. Alexander K. Pow- 
ell of Fort Texas, who has been con- 
tinually on the honor roll for the past 
year and who has also won the school 
letter in baseball, football, basketball, 
and track ; for courtesy, Lloyd L. Park- 
er of Hudson; for senior honors in 
scholarship. William A. Sherman of 
Newport. R. I.. whose average Is 93 
per cent.; for junior scholarship hon- 
ors, Franklin T. B. Boyer of Cranford, 
N. J., average 90 per cent. 

The Chalmers cup, awarded In an 
athletic contest covering the entire 
term between two junior teams known 
as the Reds and the Blues was award- 
ed the Reds. The wrestling champion- 
ships were decided as follows: Junior 
lightweight, Duncan Chalmers; junior 
middleweight, Thomas Keeher; junior 
heavyweight, Philip Erskine; senior 
lightweight. Walter Briggs; senior 
middleweight, Alexander Powell ; sen- 
ior heavyweight, or school champion, 
Harold Hickman. 


Newton 


BUILDING COLLAPSED 


RETURNED FROM GERMANY 


Sergt. George Hennrikus of Newton 
Centre, is back from Germany, where 
he spent several months with the 
army of occupation. 

He returned as a sergeant of the 
110th Infantry, 28th Division, known 
as the Keystone Division, not because 
he wanted to be hut because he was 
sent to that outfit with other Bay 
State replacements. George’s love was 
with the 26th Division but he was one 
of those who could not go across with 
Gen. Edwards when the Y-D division 
was made up. 

Hennrikus joined Co. C, 5th Massa- 
chusetts Infantry, at Newton, under 
Capt. Ftenry D. Cormerula. His sol- 
dierly instincts soon won for him pro- 
motion and he was made a corporal 
und then sergeant. He went with his 
'company to the border and later re- 
ported with It at Framingham when 
It wus called into the World War. 

Then the old 9th and part of the tfth 
Jbecume the new 101st. The balance 
pi the 5th after the depurture of the 
ifylst was sent to a camp in the 
ffyUth as a pioneer regiment and went 
Overseas as sneh; 

Eventually Sergt. Hennrikus and 
, ills Massachusetts "buddies” landed 
Jjn the Pennsylvania Division as ra- 
il lac u meat m t 


Paul Duroint of 128 Westland avenue 
and James Mclnnis of 75 Allison 
street narrowly escaped serious in- 
jury Saturday morning when a ceihent 
garage, which* they were building for 
Simon Boudrot at the rear of his 
home, 44 Taft avenue, West Newton, 
collapsed, buring them in the debris. 
Both men received cuts and bruises 
about the head and body. They were 
taken to the Newton hospital in the 
police ambulance and after treatment 
were able to leave there within a few 
hours of their admission. 

The accident occurred when the 
men started to remove the supports 
which had been holding the setting 
cement in place. They were taking 
down the last piece of timber when 
they heard a crack. They started for 
the door but before they reached it the 
sides had fallen In, bringing the roof 
do\vn on top of them. Neighbors, hear- 
ing the crash, rushed to their assist- 
ance, and helped the men to their 
feet. 


WEDDING GIFTS 
hi 

Cut Glass and Rock Cr/shU 
Rest Values In Boston 

■4r.5aMMER'ST SOSiTQN - 


— Mr. Robert W. Brown has pur- 
chased the house, 93 Wcuban street. 

— Mr. Albert E. Sanford of Jewett 
street has moved to Wellesley Hills. 

Telephone MacLean, 725 or 2664JM 
North, for anything in the carpenter 
line. advt. 

— Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Delano of 
Washington street have opened their 
summer home at Duxbury. 

— Dr. A. C. Cummings and Mr. 
George H. Snyder enjoyed a few days’ 
fishing this week in Maine. 

— Mrs. J. E. Trowbridge and family 
of Jewett street have opened their 
summer home at Crow Point, Mass. 

— Mr. Thomas F. Dolan of Sargent 
street Is interested in the recently or- 
ganized Atkinson, Blumenfield Co., to 
deal in footwear. 

— Box 15 was rung last Friday after- 
noon for a fire on the roof of a double 
house on Washington street owned by 
Mr. H. C. Daniels. 

— Mr. Nathan Heard of Waverley 
avenue is one of the incorporators In 
the recently organized Totem Die Co., 
to deal in patents. 

— The engagement of Mr. Walter 
C. C. Mandell, formerly of Hunnewell 
avenue, and Miss Minnie Tenney Mel- 
ville of Dover, N. H., is announced. 

— Miss Anna Whiting, Miss Kate 
Fox, Mrs. John Godding, Mrs. Harry 
Lutz, and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ives of 
Amherst have returned from an auto- 
mobile trip over the Mohawk Trail. 

Fishing, swimming, boating, Scout- 
ing, overnight hikes, nature study, all 
these and more. For your boy? Norse 
Camp on the Cape, Ovington, Auburn- 
dale, Mass., phone Newton West 634M. 

— Mr. Alfred MacDonald secretary 
of the Committee on Public Safety, has 
been appointed city forester of Dallas, 
Tex., and supervisor in its schools. He 
will begin his new duties about July 
1st. 

— A joint picnic of the Immanuel 
Baptist and the Lincoln Park Baptist 
Church Sunday School is to be held at 
Waverly Oaks Saturday, June 14th. 
The special cars will carry the pic- 
nickers direct to the grove. 

— The Fair held recently for the 
benefit of the Floating Hospital at the 
home of Mrs. W. L. Ratcliffe of Frank- 
lin street brought $222.00 which has 
been a source of great joy to the girls 
of the Bigelow school who helped to 
get it up. 

— The Children’s Day Exercises of 
the Immanuel Baptist Bible School 
are to be held at 10.30 Sunday morn- 
ing in combination with the regular 
morning service. Special music by 
the Sunday School and speaking by 
the boys and girls are features on the 
program. 

— At Eliot Church Children’s Day 
will be observed next Sunday at 10.30 
A. M. There will be songs by the 
Sunday School, the Baptism of Chil- 
dren and Presentation of Bibles to 
seven-year-old children and an object 
sermon. The Sunday School will at- 
tend in a body. 

— Miss Margaret Leavitt, who re- 
cently returned after 22 months’ serv- 
ice overseas with the Peter Bent 
Brigham Hospital Unit, spoke Monday 
night at a meeting of Court Genoa, 
Daughters of Isabella, at Dennison 
Hall. She explained the treatment 
given for shell shock, told of the cour- 
age of the Americans who were wound- 
ed and gave a thrilling account of an 
air raid on a hospital where she was 
stationed. She exhibited a lot of 
photos of scenes in the war zone. 

— Rev. Dr. Charles W. Wendte and 
Mrs. Wendte attended the ninth con- 
vention of the National Federation of 
Religious Liberals held last Saturday 
and Sunday at Longwood, near Ken 
nett Square, Pa. Dr. Wendte was re- 
elected secretary, which office he has 
held from the formation of the feder- 
ation, which was organized through 
his efforts and understakes to promote 
mutual understanding and co-op ara 
tion between the Unitarian and Uni- 
versalist denominations, the Society 
of Friends, the Reform Jews, and the 
Ethical Culture and other liberal or- 
ganizations. Mr. Frank H. Burt of 
Charlesbank road attended the conven- 
tion as official reporter. 

— A service was held in Eliot 
Church Memorial Sunday in recogni- 
tion of the members of the parish in 
the service of their country. Eliot 
Church had 94 members in the War, 
68 in the Army, 24 in the Navy and 
2 in the Marines. Of this number 11 
were in the air service and 6 in the 
S. A. T. C. Thirty of the number had 
commissions and twenty more were 
non-commissioned officers. Forty-six 
went to Europe or into European wat- 
ers in the Navy. Nearly one third the 
whole number are still overseas. 
Mayor Childs spoke words of memo- 
rial for the four who died in service. 
The Chorus Choir sang its last time 
till fall and a strong musical program 
was rendered including appropriate 
selections from Guilmant, Mendel- 
ssohn, Foote, Kipling’s Recessional 
and ‘The Americans Come’ as a tenor 
solo. A striking feature was the dis- 
play of the colors of the allied coun- 
tries as the National anthems were 
played on the organ. Immense Brit- 
ish, French and American flags came 
out across the front of the church to 
“God Save the King,” “The Marseil- 
laise” and “The Star Spangled Ban- 
ner” while the congregation stood at 
the close of the offertory. 


HIGH GRADE FISHING TACKLE 


Inquire at our Store for 

BEST FISHING GROUNDS 
and BEST TACKLE 

All the lakes are now open 
and the fishing is good. 

"HUNTER” HIGH-GRADE 
SPLIT BAMBOO ROOS 

One of Our Leaders 
Standard Tackle Box (withou 
tackle) 

$1.25 

p Other larger tackle boxes 

$5.00 to $10. 


J. B. HUNTER COMPANY 

HARDWARE 

60 Summer Street, Boston 


Upper Falls 

— Mrs. R. F. Shields' is visiting her 
sister in New York. 

— Mr. William Melea of Everett is 
visiting relatives on Chestnut street. 

— Mr. C. H. Blackington has pur- 
chased the house, 1138 Boylston street. 

— Pte. Donald Scavoni has returned 
from Overseas, and is now in Camp 
Devens. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Martin of 
Providence visited Mrs. Braceland dur- 
ing the holidays. 

— Pte. Daniel Crowley has been dis- 
charged from the service and is now 
with his family on Elliot street. 

— Mrs. Higgins, who has been visit- 
ing her father on Hale street, has re- 
turned to her home in New Hampshire. 

—Miss Lucy Locke entertained the 
Lockheart Class last Tuesday even- 
ing at Lockmere Lee, her home in 
Waban. 

— The Stone Institute and Newton" 
Home for Aged People have postponed 
their annual reception and sale on ac- 
count of the Soldiers’ Parade next Sat- 
urday. The reception will be held 
Saturday. June 14. 

— After today the Red Cross rooms 
at 23 High street will be closed for the 
summer. On the remaining Fridays 
in June all finished work may be left 
with Mrs. H. H. Fanning, 114 High 
street and yarns in any quantity se- 
cured for summer knitting. Stock- 
ings, sweaters, shawls, and mufflers 
are needed. Let the ladies do what 
they can in the next three months, and 
in September we hope to" boom this 
work with renewed interest. 


Newton 


THE MISSES ALLEN SC HOOL 

The graduating exercises at the 
Misses Allen School were very largely 
attended, in spite of the heat, on Tues- 
day. 

Rev. Raymond Calkins of Cambridge 
delivered the address, emphasizing 
four points to be followed thru life, 
thoroughness, accuracy, cheerfulness 
and independence. 

Miss Lucy Allen gave a reception to 
the seniors and their friends after the 
address. 

The graduates were: Elizabeth Bay- 
ley, Seattle, Washington; Ruth Bax- 
ter. Boston; Florence Gilman, Sioux 
City, Iowa; Elizabeth Nilchrist, Sioux 
City, Iowa; Elizabeth Marvin, Ports- 
mouth, N. H.; Villa Moran, Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; Olive Johnson, Northboro, 
N. Y. ; Mary Jordan, Minneapolis 
Minn.; Jessica Stewart, Newton; 
Christina Watson. Plymouth. 

The seniors held their class supper 
at the Brae Burn Country Club Tues- 
day evening and Monday evening gave 
a large dance in the hall of the school. 


BRAE BURN CLUB 


The national open golf champion- 
ship match to be played at the Brae 
Burn club beginning next Monday is 
attracting a large number of the best 
golfers in the country, including nine 
whQ have held the championship. 


—Mr. and Mrs. Welles Holmes li 
returned from Atlantic City, wh 
they spent ten days at the Hotel Tr 
more. 

— Mrs. Harry Lutz attended the F 
eration of Woman’s Clubs at Holy 
this week as a delegate of the So 
Science Club. 

— Miss Alice Holifies of Eliot r 
was a guest at the Chi Psi Frdtern 
House while attending the Jun 
Prom at Amherst. 

— Mrs. John A. Weiser and daugl^ 
Virginia Helen, of York, Pa., are vi 
ing their grandmother, Mrs. A. 
Emery at Hunnewell Chambers. 

— Mrs. Channing E. Harwood 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred E. Harwood are 
Norfolk, Va., this week to greet Lie 
Channing E. Harwood on his arri 
from France. 

— Mr. George F. Schrafft of N 
tonville has purchased the land n 
used by the Newton Golf club and 
plans ready for a handsome reside 
to be erected thereon. 

‘ — Mrs. Samuel M. Sayford and M 
Margaret Bacon of Hyde avenue h 
just returned from a three weeks’ vi 
to St. Louis, where Mr. F. Sayf 
Bacon is employed as a chemist. 

— At the patriotic service at G‘ 
Church Sunday evening, June 8th 
large choir of men. past and prgs 
members of the choir is expected, 
take part in tiie service and there 
he a special address to men in serv 
in th6 late war. a 

— Alderman Hehry I. Harriraan 
^ member of a committee to sec 
testimony upon the success or faYl 
of Prohibition. The report shows X 
the governors of 26 states were 
prohibition to 1 who was against p 
hibition; that. 17 mayors and chiefs 
police of the ten largest cities were 
prohibition and but 1 chief of pol 
against prohibition. *< 

— Summer plans of the Newt 
Branch of the American Red Cross r 
as follows: — Work at the Y. M: C. 
will stop after Wednesday, June 
until Wednesday, September 17. Ev 
Wednesday morning, however, from 
until 12 there will be someone at t 
rooms in the Y. M. C. A. to give 
wool and home sewing. It is hop 
that all who possibly can will work 
home as the need is mos t ur ge nt. 


J. s. 


Fifty- Ninth Year 

WATERMAN & 

Incorporated 


SON. 


UNDERTAKER 

Funeral, Cemetery. Cremation an 
Transfer Arrangements 

CHAPELS. Extensive salesrooms 
City and Out-oI-Town Service 
Carriage and Motor Equipment 

Frank S. Waterman. President 

Joseph S. Waterman, Vlce-Prestdenfc 
Frank S. Waterman. Jr. „ 

Cable Address. "Undertaker. Boston. 

2326 & 2328 Washington St 

Adjoining Dudley St. Elevated Statlo 

303 Harvard St.. Coolidge Corne 


FORD MARKET CO. 

297 CENTRE STREET, NEWTON 
Tslephonea Newton North 61 — 62 — 63 A. J. Ford, Prop.- 

United States Food Administration No. G 107544 


WILL BE SOLD AT 

PUBLIC AUCTION 

SATURDAY, JUNE 14, 1919 

TWO PARCELS REAL ESTATE 

Parcel 1 Contains 

Single Dwelling House 

STABLE 

Together with 9525 nij. ft. of land, 
more or less 
EXCELLENT GARDEN 
Situated At 

14 Orescent St., West Newton, Mass. 

TERMS: $200 at time of sale. Bill, 
unco In 10 d.nyn from dellvory of deed. 
Parcel 2, adjoining Parcel 1, 
constating of 

10,050 Sq.Ft. of Land, morn or less 

TERMS: $100 at time of sule, bal- 
ance In 10 dayN from delivery of deed. 
WM. H<.4fcAND~, Auctioneer 
1295 Washington. SL, West . Non ton 


Hindquarters Spring Lamb Per lb 38c 

Short Legs Spring Lamb Per lb 40c 

Rib Lamb Chops Per ^ 

Sirloin Steak and Roast Per tb 60c 

Sirloin Tip and First Cut of Rib Beef . Per lb 55c 

Fancy Brisket Corned Beef Per lb 40c 

Roasting Chickens Per lb 55c 

Fancy Broilers Per tb 60c 

Fresh Killed Fowl h I* er lb 48c 

Fresh Halibut 40c Asparagus 22c 

Fresh Salmon New Potatoes 17c 


Mackerel 

;... isc 

Spinach 

30c 

Live Lobsters . 

42c 

Bunch Beets 

18c 

Haddock 

10c 

Rhubarb 

5c 

F* founders 

15c 

New Carrots 

13c 

Butter Fish . . . . 

18c 

Lettuce 


Boiled Lobsters 


Cucumbers 

15c 

Green Beaps . . . 

20c 

Tomatoes 

30c 

Butter Beans . . 

15c 

Radishes 

5c 

Two 

Deliveries Daily— 

-10 A. M. and 2 P. M. 


One to Newtonville 

Every Afterpoon 



Closed Wednesday at 12 o’clock Nooh 
Saturday Evening 9.30 for the Summer 


/ 


7 



The newton graphic. 


VOL. XLVII.— NO. 39 


NEWTON MASS.. FRIDAY. JUNE 13, 1919. 


TERMS, $3.50 A YEAR 


A GREAT SUCCESS 

A Hearty Welcome Home Extended to Over 1,000 
Soldiers, Sailors and Marines 


The All Newton Welcome Home to 
our returned soldiers, sailors and 
marines last Saturday afternoon was 
a huge success from whatever stand- 
point it was viewed. The boys them- 
selvep were well pleased in the first 
place, the parade, entertainment and 
ball went off smoothly and the people 
turned out in goodly numbers to show 
their appreciation, as the boys went 
by. 

Between 900 and 1000 reported at 
noon at the various village centres, 
where between 300 and 400 automo- 
biles were furnished to take them 
about the city. 

A free canteen service was estab- 
lished 1 along the line of march at the 
various points of assembly by the Y. 
M. C. A. and Red Cross Society to 
serve the boys before they moved off 
on parade. Needless to say the lem- 
onade, doughnuts, and sandwiches 
were well relished and appreciated by 
the fellows. 

The automobiles arrived in the vi- 
cinity of Lake street and Common- 
wealth avenue about one o’clock 
where Capt. Henry W. Crowell and 1 a 
corps of aides assign them to places 
in the line, with the machines carry- 
ing C Co. boys at the head of the 
parade. 

The invited guests included, Brig. 
General John H. Sherburne, Colonel 
Edward L. Logan, Colonel G. W. Bun- 
nell, Lieut. Col. Philip S. Schuyler, 
Capt. Henry D. Cormerais and Chap- 
lain Pr. William J. Farrell represent- 
ing the Army and Capt. W. B. Edgar 
and Commander N. T. Nelson repre- 
senting the Navy. 

The invited guests were met by 
Mayor Edwin Q. Childs, and President 
Harriraan and Vice-President Cole of 
the board of aldermen just over the 
Boston line and promptly at two 
' o’clock the procession started, with 
an automobile carrying, a beautiful 
memorial service banner with the 
number 85 on a gold’ star to indicate 
, those residents of this city who had 
given their lives in the great war. 

The parade passed, thru Chestnut 
. hill, Thompsonville, Newton Centre, 
Newton Highlands, Upper Falls, 
Waban, Lower Falls. Auburndale, 
Newtonville, Newton, Nonantum, West 
f Newton and Auburndale again to Nor- 
umbega Park. 

At Lasell, on Woodland road, Au- 
burndale, the girls were so arranged 
on the lawn as to form the letter “L” 
and every girl held a red or white toy 
balloon, making a pretty picture. Fur- 
, thentlong on Woodland road in front 
of one of the dormitories, the senior 
class in caps and gowns also formed 
the letter “L”. 

The greatest enthusiasm was mani- 
fested as the parade passed thru No- 
nantum, the boys being greeted with 
cheers and the waving of flags. Lower 


Falls also showed considerable “pep.” 
At West Newton, the City Hall grand 
stand was filled with the invited 
guests of the day, the G. A. R. and 
Spanish War Veterans, and members 
of the city government and a march- 
ing salute was given as the machines 
moved slowly by. The Newton Con- 
stabulary band played at this point, 
the only music along the line of 
march. 

The business men did very well in 
the line of decoration, on the route of 
the parade, nearly every store in the 
city carrying the national colors in 
some form or another, many of the 
decoration, notably those at the Bank 
Building in Nonantum square, and the 
Gas Co. building, being quite elabo- 
rate The city buildings were hand- 
somely adorned, the City Hall and re- 
viewing stand in particular. Only a 
few residences were decorated, other 
than by the display flags, the paro- 
chial residence in Newton being a not- 
able exception, and the home of Mr. 
Franklin Spooner on Hancock street, 
Auburndale, being particularly at- 
tractive with thousands of small flags 
outlining the grounds and building. 

The entertainment at Norumbega 
Park was short, snappy and good. 

President Harriman, chairman of 
the committee of arrangements pre- 
sided. He said the city was indeed 
proud of the record, made by 3000 of 
its young men who" had loyally served 
the country and did honor to those 
who had paid the supreme sacrifice. 
The great battles in which you have 
participated will always stand high in 
American history and we take su- 
preme satisfaction in the quality, skill 
and bravery in which you have ex- 
celled. 

Mayor Childs reminded those pres- 
ent that on this very spot 53 years 
ago the children of Newton welcomed 
home the returning soldiers from the 
Civil War, while today their children 
welcome home those who have saved 
civilization. Today we are grateful 
to God for what you did, for your safe- 
ty and for your return. You have 
won our admiration for what you have 
done, but there still remains some- 
thing to do. We look out upon a plas- 
tic world, — a world ready to be made 
what 'we will and we look to you to 
help in bringing about a better social 
order. 

Brigadier-General John H. Sher- 
burne, the next speaker bore testi- 
mony to the propriety of this recep- 
tion, for he saw Newton men in action 
time after time. He urged the men 
to still fight for 100 per cent. Ameri- 
canism, and make themselves felt. 

Colonel George W. Bunnell said that 
the Yankee Division stood for what 
every soldier and sailor stood — coun- 
try and duty. You men have been 
(Continued on Page 3) 


Newton Trust Company 

The largest commercial bank in the suburbs of 
Boston, with an ample capital and surplus, and 

Assets of Over Six Million 

invites the banking business of the people of Newton. 
Small accounts are welcomed and given every atten- 
tion. Business accounts are treated in a broad, liberal 
manner. 


The exceptional strength of the Board of Directors 
should appeal to all. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


Seward W. Jones 
William F. Bacon 
Howard M. Biscoe 
Albert P. Carter 
Howard P. Converse 
James W. French 
S. Harold Greene 
Frank J. Hale 
Sydney Harwood 


Fred R. Haywood 
Dr. Edward E. Hopkins 
George Hutchinson 
John F. Lothrop 
Franklin T. Miller 
Frederick S. Pratt 
James L. Richards 
George F. Schrafft 
G. Fred Simpson 



An efficient and courteous organiza- 
tion, presenting the best METHODS. 
FURNISHINGS uni EQUIPMENT. 

and serving direct at any point in 

New England ’ 

wi.h select affiliations throughout the 

United Stales 

Offices, Chape!s and Wereroo us at 
Lfoston and Brookline. 

(Cinlre «f (Irrutcr lioxtuii) 





CHILDREN’S PAGEANT 

Newton Children Give Pleasing Entertain- 
ment at Farlow Park 


Wednesday morning Farlow Park 
blossomed forth into a lovely garden, 
u human garden In which the children 
of the Underwood’ School were the 
flowers. The owner of the lovely gar- 
den, according to the program, was 
Mistress Mary (Lorraine Cutting). 
The first to appear in the garden was 
the Fairy Queen (Nancy Baldwin) 
and her attendants. Some of these 
stood behind the throne, while others 
danced before the queen. Then came 
Mistress Mary herself to inspect her 
garden but to her disappointment, the 
flowers were not yet up. Her weeping 
was very realistic. 

Then, as if by magic, the garden 
blossomed forth. First came the dan- 
delions, and the tiny violets, then the 
daisies, and the buttercups, the grass- 
es, the tulips, and the roses. Each 
little girl wore a cap showing the flow- 
er she represented. Each group of 
flowers, after its dance before the 
queen, took up a position by itself 
on the lawn. A daffodil lady in pale yel- 
low also danced before the queen be- 
fore joining her companions. The 
grasses mingled with the other groups 
adding greatly to the color effect. 

Anon came the breezes and breathed 
upon the flowers, and the raindrops, 
tiny boys in grey caps with streamers 
attached to their wrists, and sprinkled 
the flowers. These were followed by 
the bluebirds who flew about among 
the flowers, and the butterflies with 
their yellow wings, and the bees, eas- 
ily recognized by the bands of orange 
with black antennae attached about 
their heads. 

Soon the garden in the morning 
sunlight with the trees of the park as 
a background was, indeed, a lovely 
sight. Then came Mistress Mary once 
more. Dancing among the flowers she 
plucked a peony from each group, re- 
turning to her position beside the 
queen. All of the dances were accom- 
panied by singing. Those who took 
part in “Mistress Mary’s Garden” were 
the following: 

Fairies-Roses — Lucille Defren, Hel- 
en O’Brien, Katherine Sprague, Janet 
Nichols, Grace Day, Eola Niles. 

Buttercups — Anne Schofield, Nancy 
Lonkenau, Martha Bell, Doris Church, 
Natalie Smith. 

Breezes — I^aura Elwell, Adeline 
MacDonald, Barbara Goodridge, Helen 
Byrne, Marjorie Greenwood, Elinor 
Hill. 

Daisies — Frances Niles, Elsie Krog- 
man, Vera Donavan, Mary Cole, Betty 
Fitts. 

Grasses — Mary Church, Franceska 
Finberg, Emily Moore. Marjorie Shaw, 
Mary Harriman, Adelaide Pelton. 

(Continued on Page 6) 


HUNTINGTON 

School For Boys 

11TII YEAR OPENS SEPT. 30 

Summer Session of Twelve Weeks 
Opens June 23 

Pri-pareH for collegci* ami technical 
schools anil offers special finishing 
courses in business ami technical sub- 
jects. 

22 college and universtiy 
men teachers with at 
least 5 years’ experience. 

Unique plan of supervised study. 
Upper and Lower Schools. 

Unsurpassed equipment for 
physical training and 
athletic sports 

IRA A. FLINNER. A. M.. Head Master 
320 Huntington Avenue 

Boston 


Trimount Cooperative Bank 


Last 7 


THE AMERICAN LEGION 

Mass Meeting to Organize a Post to be 
Held Next Monday 

On Monday evening at 8 P. M. at the 
Armory at West Newton there will be 
held the first meeting for the organ- 
ization of a post of the American Le- 
gion in this city. 

Newton has had some 2800 men in 
the service these past two years, men 
who should be and are better citizens 
by virtue of their experiences. The 
uniting of this body of men, whatever 
their rank or branch of the service, 
is full of promise — promise of further 
service of usefulness— for the Amer- 
ican Legion is pledged to the highest 
possible aim, the preservation of 
Americanism. 

Last Saturday over 1200 men took 
part in the welcome home exercises. 
These men heard from the several 
speakers words which should make 
them stop and think. 

A man by reason of having been in 
the service has not in any sense re- 
lieved himself of his duties to city, 
state, and country, rather is his ob- 
ligation the higher. 

It is hoped that every man will 
make an effort to be present Monday 
evening, for by so doing, he will give 
to Newton the first and best evidence 
of how her men who were hi service 
are going to meet their obligations of 
citizenship. 


THANKS 


are hereby extended to all who assist- 
ed’ in the perfection of details of the 
Welcome Home Parade of Saturday 
last.) 

We also deeply appreciate the loan 
of automobiles and sihcerely thank all 
owners who contributed. 

Due to the slow manner in which 
registration was aecomplished ex- 
treme measures were necessary and 
more cars appeared the last moment 
than could be used. 7 We however are 
as grateful to those who could not be 
utilized as to th& more fortunate. 

As usual “Newton did it right” and 
again we thank you all. 

John C. deMille. Chief Marshal, 
Henry W. Crowell, Auto Captain 
Fred M. Blanchard, Chairman, 
Parade Committee. 


CIVIC CLUB MEETS 


A full account of the meeting Tues- 
day evening of the Civic Club of New- 
ton, is crowded over until next week. 


UNUSUAL SERVICE 


North Church oi Nonantum Holds a 
Demobilization Service 


A most unusual service was held last 
Sunday evening at the North Church, 
Nonantum, when the demobilization of 
the attendants at this church from the 
United States service was observed. 
Addresses were made by the pastor. 
Rev. Robert L. Rae, and a« each name 
of those who had returned was called, 
the star on the service flag was covered 
with a shield. 

Those from the church who have re- 
turned from war and who were present 
at the services were: 

Hugh S. Boyd, Harry Butler, Clif- 
ford R. Carter, August Dath, Walter 
Farquhar, Bill Garside, Thomas Halk- 
yard, Harry Hitchen, Irving W. House, 
Dr. F. P. Ixjwry, Hugh Mellor, George 
Porter, Dr. Robert G. Rae, Myron Roy, 
Thomas Walwork. George Wolfenden. 
William Flood, Albert Lawton, Edgar 
Livingston. 

Those still in service are: 

Leon Abbott. Walter Fletcher. Oscar 
J. Gibbs, Byron Livingston. Alden B. 
Parkhurst, James Ridgeway, Henry 
Dath, Albert Bagshaw, Henry Stohl, 
Miss Minnie E. Weldon. 


DEATI. OF MRS. KALMAN 


Mrs. Martha A. H. Tolman died 
Monday at her home at 29 Hunter 
street, in West Newton, in her eighty- 
second year. She was the widow of 
Adams K. Tolman, who died 26 years 
ago. Mrs. Tolman, who had been ill 
for the past nine weeks, w-as born in 
Hillsboro, N. H., and was the daugh- 
ter of Ira and Hannah Holt. She . lived 
in Hillsboro and later in Fitchburg, 
where at the age of twenty-three 
years she became the wife of Mr. Tol- 
man and after that they made their 
home in Boston. For the past thirty- 
five years Mrs. Tolman had resided in 
West Newton. Mrs. Tolman is sur- 
vived by two daughters, Mrs. John L. 
Gow (Myra Tolman) and Miss Emma 
Frances Tolman and a granddaughter 
Eleanor Gow. all of West Newton. 

Funeral services were held from her 
late residence on Hunter street Wed- 
nesday afternoon, with many neigh- 
bors and friends present to testify to 
the esteem in which she was held. 
Rev. Julian C. Jaynes, pastor of the 
Unitarian church officiated and a male 
quartet sang “God is Good." “Passing 
out of the Shadow” and "Still, Still 
with Thee.” The burial was at Forest 
Hills. 


MORTGAGES 

A limited number, secured by Newton Property, now 
needed for investment of Savings Department. 

Amount limited to 60% of Appraised Value of Property 

Newton Trust Company 


NEWTON 

NEWTONVILLE 


NEWTON CENTRE 
AUBURNDALE 


WEEK OF GRADUATIONS 

Lasell, Counlry Day School, Fessenden School 
and Woodland Park Hold Interesting Exercises 


Lasell River Day 

Although the weather looked very 
unfavorable on Monday morning, the 
9th. it turned out to he as fine a day 
for the races as could be anticipated 
— cool, with but a slight wind. On 
the point were collected all the visit- 
ors and underclassmen except the en- 
tire Junior class who went in a body 
to the opposite bank of the river to 
cheer for their two crews. The four 
crews were towed down to the course 
by the Senior launch and a second 
launch containing the faculty and; the 
Woodland Park students. 

After pictures were taken of them, 
the Senior Crew and the second Jun- 
ior crew were towed down to the is- 
land where the course begins. The 
Seniors won the race by one foot — 
time, three minutes, twenty-two sec- 
onds. Then, amidst cheers from both 
sides of the river the launch started 
off again with the first Junior and 
mixed crews. Both crews came down 
the course in fine form, but the Jun- 
iors not only won the race, but also 
broke the record for the course with a 
time of 3:14^. The next race was 
run by the losers, and the second Jun- 
ior crew came in ahead, earning third 
place. 

Wild cheers from both the Senior 
launch and the crowd of Juniors an- 
nounced that it was time for the real 
excitement to begin. Then the two 
canoes flashed into sight around the 
curve, paddles flying in perfect time, 
but with the Junior crew in the lead. 
The Juniors crossed the goal nearly 
a boat length ahead of their oppon- 
ents and smashed the record they had 
set a few minutes before, with a new 
time of three minutes, twelve and a 
half seconds. 

Because of the cold and dampness, 
the picnic which was planned could 
not be carried out. and everyone re- 
turned to the school in time for lunch. 


luncheon was "ready to be served in 
the practice dining room: and pies, 
cake, candy, and bread made a tempt- 
ing exhibit in the cooking laboratory, 
over which Miss Shank and Miss Mea- 
erve were in charge. Every year two 
prizes are given, on Commencement 
morning, to the girls who make the 
best loaves of bread and everyone is 
anxiously waiting to see who will re- 
ceive the little gold and silver loaves. 


Exhibition of Paintings 

The annual exhibition of paintings 
by Lasell students was held in the 
school studio yesterday afternoon. An 
unusually attractive collection of pic- 
tures was exhibited. Aside from the 
paintings andi drawings by the stu- 
dents, the room was beautifully dec- 
orated with striking posters by fa- 
mous artists of France. Italy and Bel- 
gium. The success of this exhibit 
was due to the artist, Mary Augusta 
Mullikin. 


Commencement Concert 


Home Economics Exhibit 


The annual Home Economics Ex- 
hibit of Lasell Seminary, Auburndale. 
was held Thursday afternoon, June 
12th, at the Seminary. In the sewing i 
department were shown dresses of all I 
styles and colors, dainty underwear 
and embroidered household linen, 
made under the supervision of Miss 
Tuttle and Miss Wright. Mrs. Saun- 
ders was in charge of a most attrac- 
tive millinery exhibit. A complete 


The Annual Commencement Concert 
of Lasell was held at the Seminary on 
Wednesday evening. Under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Henry Duncan the pro- 
gram consisting of selections for or- 
gan, violin, pianoforte, and* voice, was 
of unusual interest and brilliancy. 

Woodland Park June Revelry 

On Tuesday afternoon the Woodland 
Park School held a Revelry on the 
grounds of the school. 

A group of folk dances was the 
first on the program, the children ap- 
pearing from behind a screen of ever- 
green trees. Following this came 
"Spring’s Awakening." a very charm- 
ing operetta in which the children 
represented violets, buttercups, clov- 
ers. daisies, while robins and blue- 
birds and butterflies hovered among 
the flowers, and the rain brought the 
showers. Spring herself was repre- 
sented by Elizabeth Retan in a dainty 

(Continued on Page 5J 


Interest 

_ Compounded 

Dividends Quarterly 

JUNE SHAKES NOW ON SALE 
527 TREMONT BUILDING, BOSTON 


Highest Cash Prices Paid 

For DIAMONDS 

Old Gold and Silver 
THE E. B. HORN CO. 

EsMSffl). 429 Washington St., Boston 


STYLE AND QUALITY 

FEDERAL HAT GO. 

166 FEDERAL ST. 

NEAR HIGH ST. BOSTON 


DOLLS’ HOSPITAL, Inc. 

Dolls of every description repaired 
and ail ntlualng parte supplied. 
Sleeping eyee u specialty. Wigs re- 
curled. Teddy Hears repaired. Dolls* 
> Heads, Wigs and Novelties. Dolls’ 
Dressmaking. Complete line of 
I new della. Mail orders a speolaitj 
37 Temple Place, Boston 
Telephone 1341-W Beach 


Gash tor Old Gold and Silver 

C. A. W. CROSBY & SON 

JttWOlttl'M 

480 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

Watches, Jewelry and Silverware Re- 
paired by Experienced Workman 


Automobile Service Telephone Coaneetisa 

CEO. W. MILLS 

Undertaker 

Any w here u t Any Tims 
Mortuary Chapel at Service of fvdresu 
• 17 AMD 819 WASH I NOTON STAIR 
NKWTONVTLL.il 



WHAT DO YOU WANT ? 


You may want a home, or an auto, or a farm, 
/ 0/ or a business of your own. Whatever you want is 
more likely to come true if you save your money. The 
road to independence is traveled by those who are 
willing to deny themselves a few things now that they may have the 
greater benefits later on. The first step in the right direction is to 
start an account here. 

JUNE SHARES ON SALE. START NOW! 
DIVIDENDS AT 53^% COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY 

Watertown Co-operative Bank 

Main Office. 60 MAIN ST. Hours: 9 to 3. Thurs. Evening., 7 to 9 
Branch Office, 569 MT. AUBURN ST. Hour.: 9 to 3. Tue*. Eve. 7 to 9 


NEWTOIM CENTRE 

Stucco House, 9 rooms, 2 baths, 00 

modern, 10,000 sq. feet of land 

HENRY W. SAVAGE, Inc. 

Established 1840 

564 COMMONWEALTH AVE., NEWTON CENTRE 
Newton South 1640 


SOE 


10E30E 


STORAGE BATTERY SERVICE STATIONS 


THE ONLY NEWTON 


Official C WlaiO Dealers 
ALL MAKES OF BATTERIES REGHARGED AND REPAIRED 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

v Daniel L. Kenslea Co. 

791 WASHINGTON STREET, NEWTONVILLE 

STARTING, LIGHTING AND IGNITION SERVICE STATION 

68 MAIN STREET, (inside Service) WATERTOWN 


THE SECOND CHURCH 

WEST XEWTOX 

10.45 A. M. 
Sunday, June 15 

MIL PARK will preach. 

All Seats Free. 


DIAMONDS “8&1W 


BOUGHT 
Estate* .Appraised 


( E*tubli*hed 1865) 

87 WASHINGTON ST. 
BOS 

Tel. Fort Hill 3995 


CENU1IME 

COLUMBIA 

GRAFONOLAS 

$20 and up 

BURKE’S 
DRUG STORE 

295 CENTRE STREET 
SEWTON 


GREGG 


Est. 1865 

GEORGE H. GREGG & SON 

UNDERTAKERS 

“The Old Firm” 

We are located in the 
Masonic Temple, 296 Walnut 
St., Newtonville. We are 
prepared to answer calls in 
all parts of the City of New- 
ton and the Metropolitan 
district. 


Lady As.i.tant 
Carriage & Motor Equipment 

COMPLETE CASKET SHOWROOM 

Competent and Experienced 
Help at All Houra 
Telephonea: 

Newton North 64 — 71259 


Gamp Aloha Summer School 

Sqimm Lake, Holderness, X. H. 

Tutoring School tor Fall Examinations 
for School and College 

161 h Summer Session Beirins 
July 14, 1919 

Applications may be accepted up 
to September 6, but early applica- 
tion and entrance is advised. 

Directors 

DR. EMERSON V. KIMNILL. 

St. Paul’s School, ('uncord, >. II. 
EDMUND TV. OGDEN. 

60 State SL, Boston 

For booklets and application 
blanks, or further information, ad- 
dress 

Camp Aloha Summer School Association 

60 STATE SL BOSTON 
Tel. Tlain 6559 New.on West 944- M 



KYENTY-SEVEN 
! YEARS OK EX- 
. I m CUIKNI i is Ut 

k\ I <+/W N ‘ !W i st. ami HI 

1 *‘*’L*P r PAIRING of All. 

KINDS t*l LEAKY 
HOOFS. ONLY 
FIRST 1'l.ASS work 
done and CHARGES 
a* REASONABLE 
aa CONSISTENT wllh the 1IEST 
of WORKMANSHIP. 

CAREFUL EST1M WES and EX- 
PERT advice gladly given. 

E. B. BADGER & SONS CO. 

75 PITTS ST.. BOSTON, MASS. 
Tel. Hay market 3700 


FRED L. CRAWFORD. I DC. 

Funeral Director 

49 ELMWOOD STREET 

NEWTON 


Complete Equipment for City and 
Out of Town Service 

LADY ASSISTANT 


Auto Hearse and Limousine* 


Telephone: Newton North 3309 


TO LET — Two fine offices in 
Newton Bank Building. Apply 
to Newton Savings Bank. 


30D0C 


node 


aocaoc 


CILMOUR, ROTHERY i COMPANY 

Insurance Underwriters 


120 WATER STREET, 


BOSTON 


S T. HiHHItV . (NEWTON CKNTVt! 


. ... y 


2 


THK NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1J)1!>. 



BRIGHAM’S 

Fresh, thick cream is 
simply great these days. 

It provides a whole meal, 
almost, with cereal and 
fruit. 

It adds not only to the taste, but 
makes every dish much more nutri- 
tious. 

Order an extra jar of 
BRIGHAM’S CREAM 

It’s pure, rich, and comes in a 
specially sealed jar. 

Just phone Camb. 262. 


List Your 

REAL ESTATE 

with 

J. Edward Callanan 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 
AUCTIONEER 
271 WASHINGTON STREET 
NEWTON 


Old Natick Inn 

SOUTH NATICK, MASS. 



I Junt the rijrht dlNtnnce from Newton to 
motor to dinner 

Tel. Natick 8610 AIISS HARRIS. Mgr. 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Harriet E. Sanborn late of 
Newto n in said County, deceased. 
WHEREAS, a ‘certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will and 
testament of said deceased has been 
presented to said Court, for Probate, 
by Mary Alice Sanborn who prays that 
letters testamentary may be issued to 
her, the executrix therein named, as 
M. Alice Sanborn without giving a 
surety on her official bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, on 
the twenty-third day of June A.D. 
1919, at nine o’clock In the forenoon, 
to show cause, if any you have, why 
the same should not be granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby di- 
rected to give public notice thereof, 
by publishing thi3 citation once in 
each week, for three successive weeks, 
in the Newton Graphic a newspaper 
published in Newton the last publica- 
tion to be one day. at least, before said 
Court, and by mailing postpaid, or de- 
livering a copy of this citation to all 
known persons interested in the es- 
tate, fourteen days at least before said 
Court. 

Witness, Cluirles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire. First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-seventh day of May in the year 
one thousand nine hundred and nine- 
teen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
May 30-June 6-13. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin, cred- 
itors. and all other persons inter- 
ested in the estate of Mary Sheehan 
late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. intestate. 

WHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration on the estate of said 
deceased to John J. Sheehan of New- 
ton in the County of Middlesex, with- 
out giving a surety on his bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge, in said County of Middlesex, 
on the twenty-sixth day of June A. D. 
1919, at nine o’clock in the forenoon, 
to show cause if any you have, why 
the same Bhould not be granted. 

And the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper 
publishd in Newton the last publica- 
tion to bo one day, at least, before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
fourth (lay of Juno in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

June 6-13-20 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Bertha L. Evans late of 
Newton in said County, deceased. 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will and 
testament of said deceased has been 
presented to said Court, for Probate, 
by Robert H. Evans who sprays that 
letters testamentary may be issued to 
him. the executor therein named, with- 
out giving a surety on his official 
bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, 
on the twenty-third day of June A.D. 
1919, at nine o’clock in the forenoon, 
to show cause, if any you have, why 
the same should not be granted. 

, And said petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the last publication 
to be one day, at least, before said 
Court, and by mailing postpaid, or de- 
livering a copy of this citation to all 
known persons Interested in the es- 
tate, seven days at least before said 
Court. 

Witness. Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire. First Judge of said CJourt, this 
twenty-sixth day of May in the year 
one thousand nine hundred and nine- 
teen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
May 30-June 6-13. 


Newton 


— Mrs. Julia Sweet leaves soon for 
her summer home in North East Har- 
bor. 

— Mr. Herbert George of New York 
has been staying for a few days at the 
Hollis. 

— Mrs. Benjamin T. I»wden of the 
Hollis has gone for a few weeks to 
Falmouth, Mass. 

— Miss Kntherine Lowry of the Hol- 
lis has gone to hor summer home at 
Ocean Bluff, Mass. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Earnest Foley of 
the Hollis are making a trip to Ban- 
gor, Maine, for a few days. 

— For the Summer months the Red 
Cross work-room at the Y. M. C. A. 
will be open from 10 to 12 on Wed- 
nesdays to give out wool and homo 
sewing. 

— “For exceptionally meritorious ser- 
vice to the Government as Liaison and 
Intelligence officer on the staff of the 
Attack Commander of the 10th 
Infantry Brigade, Fifth Division 
during the operations at Frapelle, 
near St. Die. Vosges. August 16 
to August 23. 1918.’’ Capt. Malcolm 
Hyde Ivy is recommended for the Dis- 
tinguished Service Medal. He was at 
Frapelle, St. Mihiel, Argonne, Meuse. 
Verdun, etc. Capt. Ivy is one of our 
Newton hoys, a graduate of Classical 
High and Harvard University and 
Law School. 


.IELLERSON— BRADBURY 


Mr. Stephen Oakes Jellerson. form- 
erly of Newtonville, and Miss Marian 
Pearl Bradbury of Norway. Maine, 
were married at 12 o’clock Saturday, 
June 7th, at the residence of the 
groom’s parents. 21 Kimball terrace, 
Newtonville. Miss Ruth Carroll of 
Norway, Maine, was maid of honor; 
Mr. Graham P. Spencer of New York 
was best man. Rev. Julian C. Jaynes 
officiated. Owing to recent illness in 
the family only a few intimate friends 
were present at the ceremony. After 
a short motor trip Mr. and Mrs. Jeller- 
son will make their home in Norway, 
Maine. 


iVlILLIINERY SALE 

MLLE. CAROLINE 

Many of Her Exclusive Models 
Have Now Reached the Department 

$5.00 and $6.00 

No Two Alike in Form or Color 
480 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON 
Block of Brunswick Hotel 


Auburndale 

—Miss Eleanor F. Dennett received 
the degree of bachelor of arts this week 
at Mt. Holyoke. 

— Miss Lucy A. Turner. '12, hns been 
elected a vice-president of the Wheaton 
Alumni Association. 

The Congregational Church need 
not fear for the future with 17 babies 
christened at the Children s service 
last Sunday. 

— Miss Madeline Coulson of Grove 
street and Miss Helen Miller of Central 
street have returned from Mt. Holyoke 
for the summer. 

— Miss Adrienne Smith took part re- 
cently in the Pageant given by the 
Camp Fire Girls of Greater Boston at 
Treniont Temple. 

— Mr. nnd Mrs. Horace G. Smith 
(nee Luella L. Eddy) of Mountain 
Lakes, New Jersey, are spending the 
summer with Mrs. Smith's parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Will C. Eddy of Wood- 
bine street. 

— The Sunday School of the Congre- 
gational Church will hold its annual 
field day on the church grounds on Sat- 
urday at 3 o’clock. There will be the 
usual stunts, with some surprises and 
refreshments. 

— Miss Ruth McAllister of Central 
street played the role of Mrs. Hard- 
castle in the production of Oliver Gold- 
smith's “She Stoops to Conquer” given 
by the junior class of 1920 of the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts of Boston Univer- 
sity Wednesday afternoon and evening, 
June 4, in Jacob Sleeper Hall. Besides 
having an important part in the junior 
play. Miss McAllister was chairman of 
the play committeo. 

— At the annual meeting of the Moth- 
ers’ Association held at the Congrega- 
tional chapel last week the following 
were elected: president, Mrs. George P. 
Knapp; vice-president. Mrs. Percival 
Wood, Mrs. George F. Butters. Mrs. C. 
B. Conn; secretary, Mrs. Edgar Spicer; 
treasurer, Mrs. S. Mason. The chair- 
men of the different departments are 
social, Mrs. Somers; music. Mrs. Nettie 
Perkins; Flower. Mrs. Scott Ryder; 
Lookout, Mrs. H. O. Cooke; Library, 
Mrs. Walter, Ushers. Mrs. Pierpont; 
Bulletin. Mrs. Howland; Care of Chil- 
dren. Mrs. George E. Martin, and Mrs. 
W. C. Champion. 


AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE 

AT COST 
• 7nwP(> v More • 

MassodiusetlsMuUkil Auto. Ins. C a 
Automobile Mutual Liability Ins. Ca 
40 Central Street, Boston 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To all persons interested in the estate 
of Ellen M. Francis late of Newton 
in said County, deceased: 
WHEREAS. George R. Brackett the 
executor of the will of sal^ deceased, 
has presented for allowance, the ac- 
count of his administration upon the 
estate of said deceased: 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County, on the sixteenth 
day of June A. D. 1919, at nine 
o'clock in the forenoon, to show cause, 
if any you have, why the same should 
not be allowed. 

And said executor is ordered to serve 
this citation by delivering a copy there- 
of to all persons interested in the es- 
tate fourteen days at least before said 
Court, or by publishing the same once 
in each week, for three successive 
weeks, In the Newton Graphic a news- 
paper published in Newton the last 
publication to be one day at least be- 
fore said Court, and by mailing, post- 
paid, a copy of this citation to all 
known persons interested in the es- 
tate seven days at least before said 
Court. 

Witness, Churles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-third day of May in the year 
one thousund nine hundred and nine- 
teen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
May 30-June 6-13. 


Merchant’s Co-operative Bank 

19 Milk Street, Boston 

BERTRAM D. BLAISDELL ALBERT E. DUFF1LL 

President Treasurer^ 

Money to loan on Real Estate 
First mortgages only Owner and occupant preferred 
Assets, $6,601,378.76 

Dividends for past year at rate of 5 ! 4 % per annum 

BEGIN NOW TO PAY OFF THAT MORTGAGE 
June Shares Now on Sale 



“THAT AFTERNOON” 

*—the visitors departed late. But dinner 
wasserved on the clot as usual. The New 
Perfection Oil Cook Stove cooked on 
while mother entertained. 

The steady blue flame of the New Per- 
fection delivers an even volume of heat 
to each utensil. The flame stays where 
you set it. 

No time wasted lugging fuel, coaxing a blaze 
or sweeping up litter. Easy to light, re-till 
and clean. In 1, 2, 3 and 4 burner sizes — 
with or without ovens and cabinets. 

The New Perfection Water Heater provides 
plenty of hot water when wanted. 

More than 3,000,000 New Perfection Cook- 
stoves now in use. At your dealer’s. 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

NEW PERFECTION 

OIL COQK STOVES 

Also Puritan Cook Stoves — 
the best Short Chimney stove. 



JEWISH FLOWER DAY 


I-rfist Sunday wns a great dny In New- 
ton for the Jewish Community. Under 
the uuspices of the Zionist Bureau for 
New England Flowor Day wns cele- 
brated. Under the chairmanship of 
Mr. Louis Fried, chairman of the Zion- 
ist District of Newton nnd the assist- 
ance of Mr. Snmtiel Shelman and Isaac 
Cantor, n dozen young men and young 
women sold (lowers on the streets of 
Newton for the Jewish National Fund. 

The following assisted in selling the 
flowers: Hazel Shwartz, Mary Cantor, 
Goldie Shrier, Amy Shriberg. Ethel 
Cantor, Elkn Gelflx, Ida Roiter, Dora 
Mllman, Ida Kligman, and Ida Trncht- 
man. $141.13 was collected. 

The Committee is very thankful for 
the co-operation of the non-Jewish 
population that nobly assisted 1 , and 
particularly Rev. Fr. Robichaud of the 
French Catholic Church at Nonantuin 
who made an appeal from the pulpit 
on behalf of the Jewish National Fund. 

A Mass meeting for the Palestine 
Restoration Fund in the afternoon wns 
held in the synagogue on Adams 
street, attended by all the Jewish res- 
idents of Newton. Watertown, and 
many from Waltham. Mr. Samuel 
Shelmnn presided and the following 
speakers addressed the meeting: 
Rabbi J. D. Jurman, Dr. M. M. Eichler, 
Abraham Alpert, Robert Silverman, 
Max Nigrrish, and I. Goldenbloom. 
$1500 was collected. The following 
contributions were made: 

Alexander S. Lewis, Newtonville, 
$200; Mr. and Mrs. Morris Fried, New- 
ton, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Kritzman, 
Watertown. Mr. and Mrs. A. Pass. 
Newton, Harry Perlmutter, Water- 
town, Mr. Louis Fried, Newton, Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry Yanko, Newton. $100; 
Wolf Fox, Newton, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Perlmutter, Newtonville, Mr. and Mrs. 
H. Shelman, Newton, Mrs. Standel, 
Watertown, $50; L. Baker, Newton- 
ville, Morris Gilfix, Newtonville, J. 
Roiter. Newton, M. Greenwold, New- 
ton, Mr. and Mrs. J. Bloom, Newton, 
Philip Sriberg, Newton. Jos. Hoffman, 
Newtonville, David Fried, Newton, 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Pferry, Newton, Abram 
Minkowitz. Newton, Mrs. A. Minko- 
witz, Newton, Joseph Kligman, New- 
tonville, Mr. Gloob, $25; Samuel Fried, 
Newton. Mrs. M. Cantor, Newton, $15; 
Miss Ruth Fried, Newton, Mr. S. 
Rubin, Newton, Bernard J. Klein, 
Newton, J. Kligman, Newtonville, Mr. 
and Mrs. Sam Brann, Newtonville, 
Jacob Mllman, Hyman Milman, Mrs. 
Mendelowich, Newtonville, Max Mill- 
man. Newton. $10; Mrs. Fanny Rubin, 
Newton, Jacob and Samuel Pass, New- 
ton, Morris Roiter, Newton, Wm. Shri- 
berg, Newton, Jacob Shriberg, New- 
ton, M. Hoffman, Jr., Newton, Rose 
Greenwald, Lillian Cohen, Minnie 
Hoffman. Newtonville, A. Kligman, 
Newtonville, $5. 


NEWTON FREE LIBRARY 


New Books 


Belden, E. S. Building superintend- 
ence for steel structures. SD-B41 
Blanton, Margaret G. Speech train- 
ing for children; the hygiene of 
speech. IKH-B61 

Carey, W. J. The kingdom that must 
be built. CK-C18 

Cobb, Cora S. God’s wonder world 1 ; 
a manual for religious instruction 
in junior grades. CXS-C63 

Crosby, O. T. International war, its 
causes and Its cure. JX-C88 

Fisher, F. B. India’s silent revolu- 
tion. F69-F63 

Gibbon, T. E. Mexico under Carran- 
za; a lawyer’s indictment of the 
crowning infamy of four hundred 
years of misrule. F958-G35 

Horstmann, H. C. Modern electrical 
construction; a reliable practical 
guide for the beginner in electrical 
construction. TDZ-H78 

Kerensky, A. F. The prelude to Bol- 
shevism. JHB-K45 

McKeever, W. A. Man and the new 
democracy. KXA-M19 m 

McMahon, J. R., ed. How these far- 
mers succeeded. This book tells the 
story of a successful farmer in each 
of sixteen agricultural states, giv- 
ing facts and figures. HEA-9M22 
Maher, R. A. The hills of desire. 
Marks, Jeanette. Courage, today and 
tomorrow. BQS-M34 

Moeller. Philip. Moliere; a romantic 
play in three acts. YD-M72 mo 
Patton, Julia. The English village; a 
literary study 1750-1850. ZY-P278 

Payne, F. L. The story of Versailles. 

F 3924- P29 

Perkins, L. F. Cornelia; the story of 
a benevolent despot. 

Reid, W. A. The young man’s chance 
in South and Central America; a 
study of opportunity. HEO-R27 
Rousseau, Victor. Wooden spoil. 
Rowland, H. C. Pearl Island. 
Slichter, S. H. The turnover of fac- 
tory labor. HE83-S63 

Sweetser, Arthur. The American air 
service; a record of its problems, 
its difficulties, its failures, and its 
final achievements. SZ-S97 

Wallis, W. D. Messiahs; Christian 
and pagan. BT-W18 

Woodhouse, Henry. The aero blue 
book and directory of aeronautic 
organizations. SZ-5W85 

Zangwill, Israel. Chosen peoples: 
the Hebraic ideal versus the Teu- 
tonic. CA-Z16 


LODGES 


Newton Lodge I. O. O. F. held me- 
morial exercises last Sunday after- 
noon at its lodge rooms in West New- 


ANNUAL RECEPTION 


cordially invited to attend. 



WEDDING! GIFTS 
In 

Percolators and dialing 
Dishes 

Trays and Table Cutlery 

>•41 SUMMER ST BOSTON** 



CLEANSING 


At Its 


BEST 


AT 


LEWANDOS 

AMERICAS GREATEST 

CLEANSERS DYERS 

LAUNDERERS 

Packages Called For and Delivered in the Newtons from Watertown Shop at Works 

Telephone 300 Newton North 

“You Can Rely on Lewandos” 

Boston New York Philadelphia 


DORCHESTER AWNING CO., INC. 

AWNINGS 

TENTS 

WATERPROOF 

HORSE AND WAGON COVERS 
ROOFING DUCK 

WEDDING CANOPIES AND LARGE TENTS TO LET 
AWNINGS TAKEN DOWN AND STORED 
Factory and Salesrooms 1548-1558 DORCHESTER AVE., 

Telephone Dorchester 722 BOSTON 



SUMMER COMFORTS! 

Vudor Porch Shades keep 
your piazza and sleeping 
porch cool and shady. 
Come in all sizes. We have 
the most comfortable and 
attractive porch furniture 
including lamps, chairs 
and tables. Prices are right. 
Wayne Cedared Bags for 
putting away winter cloth- 
ing — and evening clothes 
— guaranteed to keep all 
dust and moths from in- 
juring garments. Fine for 
furs and fur coats. 

BEMIS & JEWETT 

Newton Centre and Needham 



See the McKee Lenses. No glare, 
more light, guaranteed to pass any 
state test. Long folding lever, 
steel Auto Jacks, Pennsylvania 
Tires and Tubes. 

• 

Esta Carbon Eliminators 
Marvel Vulcanizers 
Pyrene Fire Extinguishers 

Ask for MIL GIBSON, 

Chandler & Barber Co, 

124 SUMMER ST„ BOSTON 


HARRISE. JOHONNOT 

Electrician and Contractor 

13# PEARL ST, NEWTON 
Order Office 392 Centre St, Newton 
Tetephoae 1S71-J Newtee Nertfa 
TmL 17« Newtee Nettli 


REAL ESTATE 
NEWTONS ! ! 

NEWTON REAL ESTATE 
OWNERS: Our spring season Is 
here and we are having an un- 
usual demand for real estate of 
all kinds. Whether your house 
is for sale or to rent it will be 
to your best Interests to list par- 
ticulars with us immediately. A 
card or ’phone call will bring a 
representative and expert ad- 
vice will bo given gratis. 

We respectfully solicit your 
patronage and assure you per- 
sonal interest and active service 
— at all times. 

See l T s First I 

John T. Burns & Sons, Inc. 

363 CENTRE ST., NEWTON 
807 Washington St, Newtonville 
Com. Ave, cor. Manet ILL, N. C. 

Tel. 570-424 New. No. 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Julia Sullivan late of New- 
ton in said County, deceased. 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will and tes- 
tament of said deceased has been pre- 
sented to said Court, for Probate, by 
Patrick C. Cotter who prays that let- 
ters testamentary may be issued to 
him, the executor therein named, with- 
out giving a surety on his official 
bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, on 
the twenty-third day of June A. D. 
1919, at nine o’clock in the forenoon, 
to show cause, if any you have, why 
the same should not he granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby di- 
rected to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the last publication to 
be one day, at least, before said Court, 
and by mailing postpaid, or delivering 
a copy of this citation to all known 
persons interested in the estate, seven 
days at least before said Court. 

Witness, Churles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Cqprt, this 
twentieth day of May in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

June 6-13-20 


a - 

New York’s 


Most Artistic Designer 

Juc 

e 

,1 

of 

Coats, Wraps, 

Street and Evening Gowns 

WEDDING 

e 

GOWNS A SPECIALTY 

419 Boylston St., Boston 

Enter 399 Boylston St., Room 325 

Phone B. B. 7120 


Painting, Paper Hanging 

Deagle and Aucoin 


Estimates 
Cheerfully 
Given 

Telephono 


Day or Night 


43 

Thornton 
Street 

1077-W North 




NORUMBEGA PA z R oV nd 

NOW OPEN DAILY AT 10 A. M. 

THE LIBERTY PLAYERS 

Next Week, “OFFICER 666" 

Mat. Daily at 3.30 10 Cents Nights at 8 

For Reserved Seats, ’Phone Newton West 109 
CONCERTS, AFTERNOON AND EVENING, BY 
EDNA FRANCES SIMMONS’ LADIES’ ORCHESTRA 
CANOEING— RESTAURANT— DANCING 7 to 11.30 P. M. 
SUNDAY EVENING— ALL-STAR VAUDEVILLE CONCERT 


HIGH-GRADE CARS FOR HIRE 

New High-grade Cars with Competent Chauffeurs, 
by the Week, Day or Hour. Special Low Rates for Long Trips 
Let Us Figure on Your Season’s Service 
We Can Save You Money 
W. J. RIGGS & CO., 94-96 BROADWAY, BOSTON 
Tel Beach 803 


The reliance that womenkind hast sugar-tilled wafers which they eujy 
learned to put in crackers is being | ported, 
well illustrated at the teas 


given for returning soldiers 
sailors. 

Every woman in the metropolis 
has in her pantry a generous 
ply of the National ljj 
pany’s alway s jis efiil 
sally necep tgS ^ “ 


There was no question about the 
complete success of Nettie’s discov- 
ery. as thd fragrance of the fresli 
Imps of tea which she served added 
[to the Inviting repast. 

avorite at the tea hour— 
them almost as much 
breakfast and luncheon — is the 
D. C. Graham Cracker. It seems 
nteiisable in .moden n housekeep- 
Bo thoroughly 
about the tnousands of 
in Graham flour that 
le food value is a matr 
^knowledge. 

to determine 
^or the busi- 
i won- 
kit, the 


So light and 
flaky — so crisp and easily digested — so 
fresh and wholesome — what food can 
you think of for husband and children 
equal to N.B.C. Graham Crackers? 


now ' 


lain 


:..n, 


\ oaled, 

On a 

raised with 
i ona and Lotus bisuii 
lisei 

lom of the basket. r«nd me 


NATIONAL BISCUIT 
COMPANY 


ME 


perms 

emitted a delicate fragrance, adding 
charm to the delightfully flavored. 


ANNUITIES 

have become a favorite investment 
for those desiring an absolutely 
sure net income without worry. 

ANNUITIES 

have certain desirable features 
with reference to Income and In- 
heritance Taxes. 

REFUND ANNUITIES 

of the Equitable Life have special 
features guaranteeing repayment 
to some one of every dollar paid 
in. 

RICHARD O. WALTER 
31 Equitable Bldg., Boston 

Please furnish me information 
regarding annuities: 


Name 

Address 

Date of Birth 


for 
more 
than bar- 
I knew a man 
fcv’fl'rroni France recently, 
wiio bad found it very difficult 
to procure bread that was either 
palatable or digestible. Tic had re- 
course to N. B. C. Graham Crackers, 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 

To the heirs-at-law, next of kin, cred- 
itors, and all other persons inter- 
ested in the estate of Sarah Emma 
Stanton late of Newton in said 
County, deceased, intestate. 
WHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration on the estate of said 
deceased to Harold B. Stanton of 
Watertown in the County of Middle- 
sex, without giving a surety on his 
bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge, in said County of Middlesex, 
on the thirtieth day of June A.D. 1919, 
at nine o’clock in tho forenoon, to 
show cause if any you have, why the 
same should not bo granted. 

And the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
tho Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished In Newton tho last publication 
to be one day, at least, before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
fifth day of Juno in the year one thou- 
sand nino hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

June 6-13-20. 

Notice Is hereby given, that the 
subscriber has boon duly appointed 
administrator of the estate of Hannah 
Sullivan late of Newton in the County 
of Middlesex, deceased, intestate, and 
has taken upon himself thut trust by 
giviug bond, as the law directs. All 
persons huving demands upon the es- 
tate of said deceased are required to 
exhibit the same; uml all persons in- 
debted to said estate ure called upon 
to make payment to 

JOHN SULLIVAN, Adtn. 

(Address) 

44 Varnum Ave., 

Lowell, Mass. 

Route 3. 

May 20, 1919. 

June 13-20-27. 


IflSS EDITH A. MATTESOir 


In tho death of Miss Edith Matte- 
son, who lost her life In an automo- 
bile accident on May 29th, Newton is 
deprived of one of Its most popular, 
efficient and inspiring teachers. 

Miss Matteson was horn in Dorset, 
Vermont, receiving her early educa- 
tion in the schools of that stnte. Af- 
ter graduation from tho Teachers’ 
Training School at North Adams, she 
became principal of that school and 
later of the Ludlow Grammar School. 
For ten years she taught in the Wil- 
liams School, Auburndale, resigning 
from this position to take a course in 
the Sloyd Training School for teach- 
ers. Upon the completion of this 
course of study she was elected critic 
teacher in the same institution. Later 
she returned to Newton as teacher of 
manual training in the Mason and 
Bigelow Schools where she attained 
a high degree of success during the 
past nine years. 

Miss Matteson was an ideal teacher, 
enthusiastic in her chosen line, apt in 
instruction, always tactful, kindly 
and sympathetic. Her broad interests 
in things outside the school room, in 
the work and play of her pupils, her 
high ideals, her strong and charming 
personality, all made her peculiarly 
effective as a teacher. 

Her pupils will always remember 
her with deep regard as a woman of 
high character and a true friend, one 
who always inspired them to do and 
live their best. 

Newton owes much to Miss Matte- 
son for the high ideals of thought and 
conduct she has inculcated in the 
boys who have, through the years, 
come under her influence. Her re- 
ward was the admiration and affec- 
tion so plainly shown by her boys, 
and the friendship and gratitude of 
parents. 

Miss Matteson’s unfailing cheerful- 
ness and ready sympathy endeared 
her to all her fellow teachers. Many 
a time her kindly words have made 
the day’s work easier and pleasanter. 
The teaching force of Newton has lost 
a truly professional member, one who 
did much to give to Newton schools 
that prestige which they now enjoy. 
The success which she attained will 
long continue to stimulate the teach- 
ers and her inspiring personality will 
still impress the system of which she 
was so worthy a member. 

Newton mourns the loss of a be- 
loved teacher and is grateful for the 
splendid service she rendered so mod- 
estly and perfectly. Her work here 
is finished, but its results will con- 
tinue to endure. 



WEDDING GIFTS 
in 

Guaranteed Silver Plate 
Casseroles — Baking Dishes 

S-41 SUMMER ST BOSTON* 


CINC 




GINGER ’ALE 

‘Don’t forget to send up a case of Ginger 
Ale, and it MUST be White House." 

For tho warm Hprlnic days at hand, no drink In a* 
rofroahing and satisfying as White House Pure Ginger 
Ale. 

Make it a point to have a supply of this delightful 
drink on hand all the time. Pleasing combinations 
with orange, lemon or grapo Juice will add to enjoy- 
ment of any lunch. 

White House Pure Ginger Ale la the drink you can 
always serve with confidence and pride. 

Our own Motor Delivery 
Service operates for the 

convenience of deulera. A ___ _ T . _ , _ 
call to Beach 333 will RV N \ j\ I E 
bring your supply promptly 

WHITE HOUSE GINGER ALE 


ORDER IT 


Standard Bottling & Extract Co. 

73 Harvard Street Boston 

Bottlers of Quality Orangeade, Sarsaparilla, Root Beer 
and other soft drinks 




F. Anderson. Residence, 27 Wilmot St., Watertown 
Res. Tel. Newton North 1173-M 

A. B. Levander. Residence, 38 Gilbert St., Watertown 

LIBERTY MOTOR MART 

(Anderson & Levander, Props.) 

(Formerly Furbush Garage) 

Automobile Accessories, Etc. 

Auto Repairing of All Kinds 
Live Storage Cars for Hire 

1203 Washington St., VV’est Newton 

Telephones: 1210 Newton West, 71299 Newton West 



THE LOMBARDY INN 

BOSTON 

DANCING ALL EVENING 

BoyUton Place, near Colonial Theatre 

Telephones Beach 2941-2942 
Wine Service Open Till IVIIdnlutit 

lombardy"¥y-the-sea m .,......,.«. 

NORTH SC1TUATE BEACH OPENS JUNE 15th 



(Formerly 


A GREAT SUCCESS 


LIGHTNING STRIKES HOUSE 


(Continued from Pago 1) 


thru trying times and have learned 
something that makes you different. 
You must watch and study, fight for 
the right, Justice and fair play and get 
into the fight against Bolshevism. 

Colonel Edward L. I»gan received 
a warm reception and told how the 
amalgamation of the old 5th and 9th 
regiments into the 101st had been suc- 
cessfully accomplished. His mention 
of Boughan, Joyce, Hyatt and Ray- 
mond brought, forth salvos of applause 
and he said that these men were the 
type of men Newton hud given to the 
war, and that they had fought for the 
peoplo they loved, the homes they 
cherished and the institutions they 
revered. 

Father William J. Farrell, the chap- 
lain of the 26th Division received a 
splendid reception. He made a stir- 
ring speech which went right to the 
hearts of all who heard it, urging the 
men not to forget the lessons they had 
learned abroad, and to fight sedition, 

I. W. W.ism, Bolshevikism as they had 
fought the Hun. 

Governor Calvin Coolidge came in a 
little later and spoke brieflly, remind- 
ing the men that while they were 
away they had not been forgotten. He 
expressed the gratitude of Massachu- 
setts for what they had done and 
urged them to use the same courage 
and same patience in private life — 
confident that they would perform the 
same efficient service in peace as in 
war. 

An excellent vaudeville entertain- 
ment followed for about an hour and 
then the guests proceeded to large 
tents on the ball field where covers 
had been laid for 1450. Here an ex- 
cellent dinner of grape fruit, scalloped 
fish, cold chicken, lobster and chicken 
salads and various kinds of ice creams 
coffee, cigars and cigarettes had been 
provided. Seventy-five ladies assisted 
the regular waiters in caring for the 
diners and the band which had been 
on duty at the park since three 
o’clock, provided music while the 
meal was in progress. 

In the evening the State Armory at 
West Newton was crowded to the 
doors at a grand ball given the men. 
Continuous music was furnished by 
the Constabulary band and an orches- 
tra, and ice cream and cake was 
served in an adjoining tent. Capt. 
Henry D. Cormerais was floor direc- 
tor, and he was assisted by the fol- 
lowing aides, Capt. Edward Edmunds, 
Jr., First Sergeant Wesley Pease. 
Sergt. A. Leo Taffe, Sergt. John F. 
Faherty, Sergt. Edward J. Cannon, 
Corp. Albert J. Considine, and Corp. 
Thomas Hickey. 

The committee on arrangements 
consisted of President Henry I. Harri- 
man, chairman, Mayor Edwin O. 
Childs, Aldermen Reuben Forknall, 
Percy M. Blake, Herbert M. Cole, W. 

J. Spaulding, Henry L. Cook, William 
L. Allen, and Bancroft L. Goodwin, 
with Mr. Fred M. Blanchard, chairman 
of the parade committee, Representa- 
tive Bernard Early, chairman of the 
park and dinner committee and Gen- 
eral James G. White, chairman of the 
ball committee. Capt. Henry W. Cro- 
well of Co. A State Guard was chair- 
man of the automobile committee. 

Great credit is due to all these gen- 
tlemen for the successful carrying out 
of most excellent plans for the day. 

The boys were all presented with a 
handsome souvenir badge and which 
acted as a pass of admission to the 
festivities of the day. 

There was a most gratifying re- 
sponse to the request of the commit- 
tee that the men appear in uniform, 
the men in citizen clothes being hardly 
noticable. 

A pleasing incident of the afternoon 
was the presentation at the dinner, of 
a gold watch to Thomas Tredden of 
Auburndale. The presentation was 
made by Mayor Childs and was the 
gift of Auburndale friends of Mr. 
Tredden. who was tho youngest resi- 
dent of that village to enlist. 

The boys had a good time in the 
parade by spraying the police officers 
they passed with pop beer. A liquid 
barrage was laid down with great 
skill and precision and the cops made 
a hasty and undignified retreat before 
it. 


PEARSON -LITCHFIELD 


Miss Susan Jackson, housekeeper 
for James Housley of 135 High street, 
Newton Upper Falls, had Just, removed 
part of her clothes and placed them on 
a chair in her room on the third floor, 
as she was going fo bed Monday night, 
when a holt of lightning crashed thru 
the roof, passed across the room and 
set the clothes on fire, burning them 
to a crisp. The bolt then followed up 
the chimney and Jumped to the wires 
outside the house, hurling a brick 
from the chimney through a large 
plate glass window, covered with a 
heavy copper screen in the dining 
room of Charles G. O’Malley, one hun- 
dred feet away. Mr. O’Malley’s chil- 
dren had a narrow escape. 

Mr. Housley, who is about seventy- 
five years old, was asleep on the sec- 
ond floor of his home. He is quite 
hard of hearing, but was awakened by 
the crash and the screams of Miss 
Jackson. He rushed upstairs and 
threw her clothes Into the bathtub, 
but not in time to save them. Neither 
Mr. Housley nor Miss Jackson was in- 
jured. The house was set on fire, but 
the heavy shower quickly extinguished 
the flames. 


DROWNED AT RIVERSIDE 


Mr. Frederic Harrington, a resident 
of Winchester, was drowned last Fri- 
day while canoeing near the Riverside 
Recreation Grounds. Mr. Harrington 
was alone in the canoe and some boys 
saw the canoe overturn and Mr. Har- 
rington fall into the water. The po- 
lice were notified and the body recov- 
ered', but too late for resuscitation. 
Mr. Harrington was 52 years of age. 


CARMANS 

Specialty Shoe Shops, Inc. 

1162 Tremont St. I 
2 Stores /Boston 

/ 126 Tremont St. j 

The new Spring Pumps, Oxfords and Boots reveal 
many new and exclusive styles. Those who know what is 
new and of good style and quality may find it here among 
our complete stock. . It is safe to assert that more varie- 
ties may be found here than elsewhere. We also carry 
a complete line of the Celebrated Phoenix Guaranteed 
Hosiery in New Shades. 


Last Saturday Miss Cordelia Amy 
Litchfield, the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. W. E. Litchfield of 75 BdTlevue 
street, Newton, was married to Mr. 
Harold Grant Pearson of Brooklyn, 
New York. The ceremony was per- 
formed by the Rev. H. Grant Person 
in Eliot Church. Newton. 

The matron of honor was Mrs. Wal- 
ter L. Nourse and the flower girl, Miss 
Dorothy Nourse. both of West Newton. 
The bridesmaids were Miss Catherine 
Lautz of Buffalo, New York, and Miss 
Ruth Litchfield, sister of the bride. 

The best man was Mr. Alexander 
Pearson of Brooklyn, and tho ushers 
Mr. H. H. Donaldson of Brooklyn, 
N. Y.. Mr. G. H. Ernst, Jr., of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., Mr. Wallace M. Brown of 
Brooklyn, and Mr. George A. Litch- 
field of Newton. 

The bride was dressed in white 
tulle with pearls and silver with a 
court train of Duchess satin trimmed 
with orange blossoms. She carried 
lillies of tho valley and white orchids. 

The bridesmaids’ dresses were of 
orchid and pink chiffon and silver. 
They carried pink sweet peas. 

After the ceremony there was a re- 
ception at the home of the bride. The 
house was beautifully decorated with 
asparagus fern and pink peonies, 
roses and gladiolus. In the receiving 
line were Mr. and Mrs. Litchfield, Mr. 
and Mrs. Alexander Pearson, and the 
Misses Pearson. 

After a trip to the Belgrade I^ikes, 
Maine, Mr. and Mrs. Pearson will live 
in Brooklyn, New York. 

ClIURUH NOTICE 


First Church of Christ, Scientist, of 
Newton. Player’s Hull, Washington 
street, West Newton. Sunday service 
10.46 A. M. Subject of lesson-sermon: 
“God, the Preserver of Mail.’’ Sunduy 
School 10.46 A. M. Testimonial meet- 
ing Wednesday 8 1‘. M. The public is 
cordiully invited to uttend the serv- 
ices and to use the Reading Room at 
297 Walnut street, Newtonville, which 
is open daily from 2 to 6 in the after- 
noon, and on Tuesday and Saturday 
evenings from 7.30 until 9. 


AUTOMOBli; INSURANCE 

AT COST 
• miy Pa y More • - 

Massachusetts Mutual Auto. Ins. Cq 
A utomobile Mutual Liability Ins. Ca 
10 Central Street, Boston 


BASLEY LUMBER COMPANY 

NO. 19 CRAFTS STREET, NEWTONVILLE, MASS. 

Will appreciate your business 
Spruce, Hardpine and Fir Timber Flooring, Sheathing 

Laths, Clapboards, Shingles, Siding 
Outside Mouldings and Finish 
Asphalt Slate Shingles, Roofing Paper, Etc. 
TELEPHONE NEWTON NORTH 3285 


The Sign o/Service 

SOCONY 


Motor 

A wide variety of 
mixtures is being 
sold under the 
name “gasoline." 
The best way to 
be sure that the 
gasoline you buy 
measures up to 
quality standards 


we-SEli I Gasoline 


SDCONY 


MOTOR 

GASOLINE 


is to buy from the 
dealers listed be- 
low. They sell 
only SOCONY 
—uniform, pure, 
powerful. Look 
for the Red, 
White and Blue 
So-CO-ny Sign. 


The Sign of a I * and the World’s 

Reliable Dealer g STANDARD OlLCO.SfN.Yj Best Gasoline 
DEALERS WHO SELL SOCONY MOTOR GASOLINE 


AUBEGA GARAGE 2006 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 
BAKER AUTO SUPPLY COMPANY 

Washington Street, West Newton 
BRAE Bl RN GOLF CLUB Fuller Street, West Newton 

BRIGGS, J. M. & SONS 

193 Washington Street, Newton 

CRAWFORD’S GARAGE Elmwood Street, Newton ' 

CROWELL AUTO SUPPLY COMPANY 

Commonwealth Avenue, Newton Centre 
ELITE GARAGE 

2240 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 
GARDEN CITY GARAGE Washington Street, Newton 

HIGHLAND MILLS 

Needham Street, Newton Highlands 
LIBERTY MOTOR MART 

1203 Washington Street, West Newton 

McKinnon, m. p. 

613 Watertown Street, Newtonville 
MEHIGAN, JOHN 1298 Commonwealth Ave., Waban ► 

MONAGHAN, J. V. & SONS 

5 Auburn Street, West Newton 
NEWTON CENTRE GARAGE 

792 Beacon Street, Newton Centre 
NEWTONVILLE GARAGE 

791 Washington Street, Newtonville 
NEWTONVILLE AUTO RENTAL CO. 

Washington Street, Newtonville 

NON ANT UM GARAGE 130 Bridge Street, Newton 

NORUMBEGA PARK COMPANY 

Commonwealth Avenue, Auburndale 
WASHINGTON STREET GARAGE 

Washington Street, Newton Lower Falls 




4 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 1», 1919. 




THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 

BMtrfd at tbo Pod-flfflM at Bort< 
Mm*., mm arroad-elMa matter. 


lit. (VO IVr Year. Slnglr CoplN, 6 Cents 

By Mall. Postage Free. 

All money eent at sender's risk. 

Checks and money orders should be made 
payable to 

NEWTON GRAPHIC PUBLISHING CO. 

J. C. Brtmbleeom, Treaa. 


EDITORIAL 


All the speakers last Saturday night 
at the Welcome Home reception em- 
phasized the need of constant work 
and fight against anarchy and Bolshe- 
vism and reminded the returned sol- 
diers that the country looked to them 
to lead in the great struggle for 
American freedom and independence. 
Company A of the State Guard should 
he the rallying point for active work 
in this line, and should be recruited 
at once up to its full strongth before 
it goes into a week’s camp next month 
at Boxford. Co. A has had a splen- 
did record during the war and there 
should be no doubt of its continuing 
its high standard in the future. 

Our representatives and senator at 
the State House are to be heartily 
commended for their action in oppos- 
ing an increase in salary of members 
of the Legislature and in supporting 
the Governor’s veto of that measure. 

The welcome home reception last 
Saturday was a credit to the city and 
showed the boys what the home folks 
thought of them. 


GERANIUM and REDDING PLANTS 
of All Kinds at 
NEWTON ROSE CONSERVATORIES 
R. C. Bridgham, Prop. 

3*29 Neurtonvllle Avenue 
Newtonvllle 

Telephone Newton North 401 


THE FIRST AMERICAN BICYCLE 

Editor of the Graphic: 

It may interest your readers to 
know when and where in America the 
first bicycle was made. Up to the year 
1876 there were many wooden veloci- 
pedes made, and among these there 
were several that were gradually de- 
parting from the pattern of the veloci- 
pede and approaching the form of the 
bicycle of a later date. The veloci- 
pede went out because of its thrust 
action on the pedals. The success of 
the bicycle was owing to the vertical 
action where the weight of the rider 
furnished a good part of the propelling 
force. In 1S76 Mr. R. H. Hodgson con- 
ducted a machine shop at Xewton 
Upper Falls, and it was there that 
Mr. Hodgson built the first American 
bicycle. The way in which he con- 
structed his first wheel is interesting. 
It was an evolution from the baby 
carriage. In anticipation of the arri- 
val of an addition to his family, Mr. 
Hodgson built a baby carriage with 
wire wheels, the tension of the spokes 
of which was brought about bv a slid- 
ing flange on the hub; a device for 
which he applied for a patent. This 
was one of the first of many experi- 
mental wire wheels made, and recog- 
nizing that, with its tension spokes, it 
was much stronger than the ordinary 
wooden wheel, he made a larger one 
which was tested in connection with 
three wooden wheels on a butcher’s 
wagon. Finding that it stood up re- 
markably well, he fitted a backbone 
and a smaller wheel to it. and after 
riding it himself awhile he sold it to 
a Boston lawyer. This was the first 
complete bicycle made in the U. S 
and Xewton city was its birthplace. 
There were other wheels in the coun- 
try, at the time, but they were all im- 
/ ported ones. The first importfed one 
was brought from France by W. M. 
Wright of Xew Y^rk in 1873. Cun- 
ningham, Heath and Co. imported and 
sold English wheels in 1877, and in 
January, 1878. the Pope Manufactur- 
ing Co. imported a lot of English bi- 
cycles. 

R. H. Hodgson turned out and sold 
many bicycles up to the year 1879. He 
built two weights of the wheel. "The 
Velocity" and "The Xewton Chal- 
lenge." For want of capital he sold 
his business to McKee and Harring- 
ton of Xew York City, and entered 
into employment with that firm as 
superintendent of its factory. 

Abbot Bassett. 


West Ne wton 

— Mr. W. H. French of Henshaw 
street left the first of the week for a 
stay at Gloucester. 

— West Newton Co-operative Bunk, 
Sturt nil account this month. 1 to 10 
shares at $1.00 eaelfc Advt. 

— Miss Eva M. Bartholomew was a 
member of the graduating class this 
week at Vassar college. 

— Mrs. Theodore A. Fleu and Miss 
Ethel Fleu of Elm street ure at South 
Bristol. Me., for the summer. 

— Mr. Austin H. Decatur of Otis 
street and Mr. Robert W. Neff of For- 
est avenue have been elected directors 
of the Boston Rotary Club. 

— Mr. Clareuce L. Newton of Lenox 
street presided Monday evening at the 
annual banquet of the class of 1905 
Boston University La\v School. 

— Miss Marion Zinderstein, playing 
with Miss Eleanor Goss of New York 
won the Metropolitan championship in 
tennis last Saturday at Forest Hills, 
New’ York. 

— A reception to the returned sol- 
diers w’ill he given by the people of the 
Lincoln Park Baptist Church tonight 
at 7.45. There are tw’enty-seven young 
men, who have enlisted from this 
church. Nearly all have returned to 
their homes. 

— A joint picnic of the Immanuel 
Baptist Sunday School of Newton and 
the Lincoln Park Baptist Sunday 
School of West Newton, will take place 
tomorrow at Waverley Oaks. Special 
cars will leave New’ton at 9 A. M. and 
Houghton’s Corner at 9.10. 


FAELTEN PIANOFORTE SCHOOL 

Thirty-two young people received 
diplomas Saturday afternoon at the 
annual graduation exercises of the 
Faelten Pianoforte School, held in 
Huntington Hall. The program in- 
cluded an address by Mrs. Reinhold 
Faelten and pianoforte selections 
from Bach, Beethoven and Mendels- 
sohn. The director, Mr. Carl Faelten, 
awarded diplomas as follow’s: 

College Course — Edna Aldrich, Eve- 
lyn Bucknam. Mary Campbell, Ruth 
Cummings. Lillian Dean. Lucy M. 
Fussell. Selma Glidden, Ruth Porter. 
Freda M. Seavy, Sylvia D. Storrs, Lois 
H. Swett, Helen M. Treadwell. Flor- 
ence Wallis, Muriel Watson, Richard 
F. Hoyt. 

Preparatory Course — Ruth Brigham. 
Spencer Brugh, Katherine Carpenter. 
Elizabeth Chase. Helen Dervan. Mar- 
guerite D’Orval. Enid Ely. Gladys 
Freeman. Marjorie Graves, Hope Lin- 
coln, Margaret McLain, Willis Mur- 
phy, Herbert Patrick, Anna Rodinsky, 
Jeannette Simpson, Eleanor Wales, 
Ruth Warn. 


West Newton 

— Mr. P. W. Warren and family have 
moved from Waltham street to Wa- 
ban. Mass. 

— Mr. E. E. Blodgett of Temple 
street has opened his summer homo at 
Wianno, Mass. 

— Mr. Hammond V. FitzGerald of 
CheHtnut street has returned from 
service overseas. 

— Mr. Norman Marshall and family 
have moved from Chestnut street to 
Windemere road Auburndnle. 

— Mr. C. H. Dwinnell and family of 
Berkeley street have opened their 
summer home at Duxbury,' Mass. 

— Miss R. W. Farnham of Warwick 
road has returned from Dallas, Tex., 
where she has been engaged in teach- 
ing. 

— Mrs. Robert Mondell and Miss 
Florence Mandell gave an "At Home” 
in their new home on Waltham street 
Wednesday afternoon. j 

— The chapel organ at the Second 
Church has hen readjusted so as to 
bring out the tone better and make 
the consol more convenient. 

—Mrs. E. B. Wilson of Otis street 
entertained friends from out of town 
last week at luncheon followed by 
bridge at the Brae Burn Club. 

— About midnight Monday, the auto- 
mobile of W. B. Saunders collided with 
a pole near the railroad bridge on 
Washington street, damaging the car 
somewhat. 

— On Monday evening at 7.30 o’clock 
the W. C. T. U. will hold its regular 
meeting at the home of Mrs. Mabel S. 
Lee. 53 Washburn avenue. Auburndale. 
The subject to be considered is, “Anti- 
Narcotics.” 


West Newton 

— Mrs. Arthur Howland entertained 
the luncheon club on Monday. 

— The wedding of Miss Pauline Fred 
crick of Walthnm street and Mr. Theo- 
dore P. Washburn of Newton, took 
place last week Thursday. Rev, J. Ed- 
gar Park performing the ceremony. 

— Rev. Ferdinand Q. Blanchard, D. 
D.. of Cleveland and Rev. Jay T. 
Stocking, D. D., of Upper Montclair 
are to he heard at the Second Church 
this summer. Both are well known as 
former residents of this city. 

— Last Friday afternoon the driver 
of the auto truck of the Garden City 
Laundry Co. left the machine with the 
engine running while on Highland 
street, and the truck made a wild run 
up the street until it collided with a 
tree near Temple street. 

— The one hundredth anniversary 
of the founding of the Second Church 
School was celebrated last Sunday. 
The Sunday School was opened in 
1819 in a schoolhouse on Waltham 
street, opposite the present Davis 
School. An anniversary address was 
delivered by Rev. J. Edgar Park, more 
than 750 persons were present at this 
Children’s Day service. 


LEONA’S 

HOME-MADE CANDIES 

1259 WASHINGTON STREET 
WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Tel. Newton West 1256- R 
CHOCOLATES AND BON-BONS 
Made Fresh Every Day 
lee Cream Served Also 


NEWTON SAVINGS BANK 


INCORPORATED 1831 


The Oldest and Largest Bank in the City of Newton 

Deposit Now Interest Begins 

JULY IO 

The only Savings Bank in Newton paying 



De Meritte School 


„ — - August 

® 815 Doylston St., Ho* ton, Man. 

A 9 A. M. Tel. II. II. 794-R Apply now 
L Six Stur CourHi** 

L Review Preparatory 


REAL ESTATE 


J. Edward Callanan. a Newton 
broker, reports that final papers have 
gone on record conveying 14 Maple 
street, Newton to Timothy Healey. 
The estate consists of a two-family 
frame dwelling and 7300 sq. ft. of land 
all valued at $6000. Title comes from 
Annie Cahill. 

Mr. John F. Cahill has bought 
through J. Edward Callanan, the es- 
tate at 34 Channing street, Newton, 
consisting of a three-family frame 
dwelling and 4000 feet of land, all 
taxed for $10,000. John and Annie 
Leary were the grantors. 

Mr. Callanan has sold for Frank L. 
Roberts his new two-family house sit- 
uated at 14 Hood street, Newton. With 
the house are 5000 feet of land, with 
a total valuation of $7500. Mr. Philip 
Callan buys for investment. 

Real Wealth. 

The wealth of a man is In the num- 
ber of things that he loves and blesses, 
and that he Is loved and blessed by. 


WALDORF 

THEATRE 

WALTHAM 

Afternoons 2.30 to 4.30 Evenings Continuous 7 to 10.45 
Thur — Fri — Sat 

REX BEACH’S 

“The Crimson Gardenia” 

Starring Mary Pickford’s Husband, Owen Moore 
A Stirring Drama 


On The Same Bill 

“STARS FROM TOYLAND” 

Novelty Mankins to Amuse the Children 

J. Francis Sullivan & Co. 

In 

“THE LIVE WIRE” Singing - Dancing 

NEWS WEEKLY— CONCERT ORCHESTRA 

Next Mon — Tues — Wed 

Robt. Warwick and Elaine Hammerstien 

In 

“The Accidental Honeymoon” 

Special Comedy Musical Program 

NEWS WEEKLY, ETC. 

NOTE -SATURDAY EVENING, JUNE 2I»t thi. theatre 
will close lor the summer season. Re-open after extensive 
alterations Li August. 


Useful 
GIFTS at 




HAIR ORNAMENTS 
Casque combs, Jet combs, 
Barrettes, new Spanish-Ef- 
fect back combs and fancy 
hair pins. 

Prices $1.00 to $12.00 


TRAVELLING CLOCKS 
A new model in a radium dial fold- 
ing clock. The luminous dial, with its 
figures and hands covered with this 
wonderful compound, enables one to 
easily read the time in absolute dark- 
ness. Prices $10.00 to $80.00. Gun 
Metal Radium dial alarm watches 
$7.50. 



SILVER PITCHER 

This Sterling silver pitcher 
makes an unusual gift which 
one likes to give or receive. 

Price $42.00 and up 




PICKARD CHINA 

Exquisitely hand painted in exclusive 
decorations. The coffee set shown, three 
pieces. Price $25.00. 



CUT CRYSTAL BASKET 
The purity of the cut 
crystal glass, the delicate 
artistic cuttings, of the floral 
patterns make them most 
desirable gifts at any time. 

Price s $1.25 to $24.00 




GOLD CUFF LINKS 
We have a remark- 
able variety of new de- 
signs, engine turned 
and brocade finish. 
Gold with enamel deco- 
ration is seen in many 
new patterns. Prices in 
14 Kt. gold 

$4.50 to $235.00 



CANTEEN BOXES 

Great variety of shapes 
and leathers. 

Prices $5.00 to $20.00 



STERLING SILVER 
VASES 

Many new designs in 
vases are constantly 
being added to our dis- 
play. 

Prices $3.25 to $135.00 



SILVER DEPOSIT GLASS 
Our stock includes many unique 
ideas such as pitchers, sugars and 
creams, cracker and cheese dishes, 
cheese and lemon plates with 
servers, Betty tea sets, coffee sets 
of Lenox china heavily deposited. 

Prices $3.00 to $50.00 


DOOR STOP AND BANK 
This Fido door stop and 
bank is a very popular and 
useful article. Fido will hold 
your door and also your 
pennies. Price $2.00 


14 KT. GOLD PENCIL 

This is an extra heavy 14 Kt. gold pencil with engine turned 
design. Prices from $7.00 to $35.00 


STERLING SILVER SETS 


Attractive and desirable for wedding gifts and the home, are shown in our Silver 
Room, easily accessible on the street floor. Here also may be seen Coffee Sets, 
Trays, Platters, Centre Pieces, Vases and many other useful Silver articles. 



24 Winter Street, Boston 

Jewelers for 98 Years 


« . n .. ( Newton North 1052 .. , ... , 

Auto Delivery ™ c P h ° no3 | Newtonjort^^o Main Office, Watertown 

THOMAS JOSEPH McCOE 

Construction and 
Motor Trucking Contractor 


WHOLESALE 


COAL 


RETAIL 


264 North Beacon St., 


Watertown, Mass. 


CRAWFORD’S 

GARAGE AND TAXI SERVICE 

INC. 

Machines For All Purposes 

CADILLAC and FORD CARS 
ALL NIGHT SERVICE 

Bast of Service and Ample Storage 
for Private Automobiles 

49 Elmwood Street 

Fred L. Crawford, Manager 
Telephone: Newton North 3308 


Buy U. S. Govt. W. S. S. 


THE GEO. W. BUSH CO. 

BURT M. RICH, Proprietor 

Funeral Directors 

Established IS74 

Are Located at 402 Centre Street 

_ , . j Nswtoa North 40S-M 

Tolcpboass { Newt o» North 4SS-J 

AUTO II KARS K—LIMOU HINTS CAM 


MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF 
REAL ESTATE 


Under and by virtue of the power of 
sale contained in a certain mortgage 
of real estate given by Earle R. Haynes 
and Mary A. Haynes, his wife, in her 
right, both of Boston, Suffolk County, 
Massachusetts to Henry J. O’Meara 
and John J. McCarthy, as they are 
Trustees of the Bay State Development 
Company, acting under a declaration of 
trust dated June 28, 1916, and recorded 
with Middlesex South District Deeds, 
Book 4064, Page 163, dated April 30, 
1917, anil recorded with Middlesex 
South District Deeds, Book 4132, Page 
234. for breach of the condition of said 
mortgage, and for the purpose of fore- 
closing the same, will he sold at public 
auction on the premises on Saturday, 
July 5, 1919, at 9.15 o’clock in the 
morning, the real estate described in 
said mortgage, to wit: 

"The land in Newton, Middlesex 
County, Massachusetts, with the build- 
ings thereon, being shown as Lot Thir- 
ty (30) on a plan entitled “Greenwold, 
Bay State Development Co., Newton, 
Mass., July 1, 1916, Charles A. McMan- 
us, C. E. revised December 12, 1916", 
recorded with Middlesex South District 
Deeds, Plan Book 256, Plan 13, bound- 
ed and described as follows: — 

Southwesterly by Pricilla Road, Sev- 
enty-three and 2-10 (73.2) feet; 

Northwesterly by Lot No. 31 on said 
plan, One hundred nine and 9-10 
(109.9) feet; 

Northeasterly by Lot No. 3 on said 
plan, Seventy-five and 4-10 (75.4) feet; 
and 

Southeasterly by Lot No. 29 on said 
plan, One hundred twelve and 7-10 
(112.7) feet. 

Containing 8268 square feet, be any 
or all of said contents or measure- 
ments more or less.” 

Said premises will he sold subject 
to restrictions of record so far as now 
in force and applicable. 

Said premises will also be sold 
subject to all unpaid taxes, tax titles, 
municipal Hens and assessments, If 
any. Two hundred dollars ($200) re- 
quired at sale. 

I HO NR Y J. O’MEARA and JOHN J. 

MCCARTHY, Trustees of the Bay 

State Development Co., Mortgagees. 

For further particulars upply either 
to the Mortgagees, or to Swain, Car- 
penter & Nay, Attorneys for the Mort- 
gagees, Rooms 1111-1117 Paddock 
Building, 101 Tremont street, Boston, 
Mass. 

June 13-20-27. 


'TV:' 



BUILD YOUR HOME NOW 
AND SAVE MONEY 
DO NOT WAIT until the building boom 
Is on, which la sure to advance the price 
of labor and mnterlala. Let us show you 
the actual estimates, and how you can 
build this seven-room colonial house, with 
all Improvements, for |4200. Call and see 
the plans and see how we saved the 
owner J!000 on tho cost of this building. 
Plans of buildings of every description. 
DITCHINGS & HITCHINGS, Architects, 
176 Federal St., Boston, Mass. 



AT 
FOUNTS" 

AND 

IN BOTTLfcS 


Hits the right spot. 
Best for thirst. Try 
It at the fount— buy 
it for the home. 
Good anywhere, any 
time! 


MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF 
REAL ESTATE 


r PUR6 
Fhealthfui 

r DELICIOUS 

Distributed by 
COCHRANE A STI.VtaTS, West Newton 
G. P. ATKINS, 300 Centro St. Newton 


Under and by virtue of the power of 
sale contained in a certain mortgage 
of real estate given by Walter L. 
Haynes and Jessie R. Haynes, his 
wife, in her right, both of Boston, 
Suffolk County, Massachusetts, to 
Henry J. O’Meara and John J. Mc- 
Carthy, as they are Trustees of the 
Bay State Development Company, act- 
ing under a Declaration of Trust 
dated June 28. 1916, recorded with 
Middlesex South District Deeds, Book 
4064, Page 163, dated April 30, 1917, 
and recorded with Middlesex South 
District Deeds, Book 4132, Page 231, 
for breach of the condition of said 
mortgage, and for the purpose of fore- 
closing the same, will be sold at pub- 
lic auction on the premises on Satur- 
day, July 5, 1919, at Nine o’clock in 
the morning, the real estate described 
in said mortgage, to wit: 

“The land in Newton, Middlesex 
County, Massachusetts, with the build- 
ings thereon, being shown as Lot 
Twenty-seven (27) on a plan entitled 
“Greenwold, Bay State Development 
Co., Newton, Mass., July 1, 1916, 

Charles A. McManus, C. E., revised 
December 12, 1916”, recorded with 
Middlesex South District Deeds, Book 
of Plans No. 256, Plan 13, bounded and 
described as follows: — 

Westerly by Mayflower Road, Fifty- 
nine and 3-10 (59.3) feet; 

Northerly by Lot No. 28 on said 
plan, One hundred nine and 9-10 
(109.9) feet; 

Easterly by Lots Nos. 7 and 8 on 
said plan, Eighty-five and 5-10 (86.5) 
feet; and 

Southerly by Lot No. 26 on said 
plan. Ninety-six and 5-10 (96.5) feet. 

Containing 7725.8 square feet, be 
any or all of said contents or meas- 
urements more or less.” 

Said premises will be sold subject 
to restrictions of record so far as now 
in force and .applicable. 

Said) premises will also be sold sub- 
ject to all unpaid taxes, tax titles, 
municipal liens and assessments, if 
any. Two hundred dollars ($200) re- 
quired at sale. 

HENRY J. O’MEARA and JOHN J. 

McCarthy, TRS. of the Bay State 

Development Co., Mortgagees. 

For further particulars apply eithor 
to the Mortgagees or to Swain, Car- 
penter & Nay, Attorneys for the Mort- 
gagees, Rooms XU1-1117 Paddock 
Building, 101 Tremont Street, Boston, 
Muss. 

June 13-20-27. 


TIIK NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE IS, Iftlff. 


Light Four 
Touring 
$1225 



Light Six 
Touring 
$1585 


ABOVE PRICEB'F.'O. B. DETROIT 


Big Six Touring , $1985 

r R. H. EVANS 

Brook Street, Newton 


Newton ville 

Mrs. Walter Coombs of Simpson 
race has returned from Wlnnisquam 
e. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur F. Jones of 
wtonvillo avenue are at their 
mer home at Kenberma. 

West Newton Co-operative Bank, 
rt an account this month. 1 to 10 
es at $1.00 each. Advt. 

The alarm from box 227 Monday 
lit was rung for a wire burning a 
e near Highland and Lowell ave- 
s. 

The glass in a passing train was 
ken by a rifle shot, last Wednesday 
ernoon while near the Mt. Vernon 
eet bridge. 

Congratulations to Dr. and Mrs. 
,*rtley W. Thayer of Walnut street, a 
ghter, who has been named Jane 
ing Thayer. 

Mr. Harold Gordon, formerly of 
wtonville, now of Pittsburg, has 
n visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 

L. Gordon of Washington park. 

The Ladies’ Aid of the Methodist 
Iscopal Church held a thimble party 
the home of Mrs. W. T. Rich, 20 
••gent street, Newton, Thursday af- 
noon. 

Mr. Charles H. Simons of Clyde 
eet has been elected president of the 
ston Rotary Club and left this week 
attend the national convention of 
’’Rotarians held at Kansas City. 

The annual picnic of the Methodist 
iscopal Sunday School will be held 
s week Saturday at Norumbega. 
Hey cars leave Newtonville at 9.24. 
children of the church and Sunday 
ool are cordially invited. 

Next Sunday will be Children’s 
nday at Central Church. The pro- 
m is in charge of Mrs. Wallace C. 
yden. There is to be a Pageant 
led "Heirs of Liberty” assisted by 
choir. The children of Miss Bertha 
Uer’s Class are going to give a 
drill. 

This evening at 7.45 in the Central 
urch. Mr. L. R. Fowle will tell of the 
ply interesting events In Constanti- 
yle during the war. The address 
11 be one of great importance in first 
nd information as Mr. Fowle had 
eptional opportunities in diplomatic 
cles in knowing facts. It will be a 
rtli while address and the public is 
ally- -trrvited. Rev. D. Brewer 
riy pronounces it one of the speeches 
the year. 


(tORDON'Sj 


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MON.. TUES., WEI). 

. DOROTHY GISH 

, In “ I’LL CET HIM YET” 

jTs VAUDEVILLE AC 6 X8 

EXTRA EXTRA 

SUSAN TOMPKINS 
Formerly with Sounn'H Rand 


FERN A 
DAVIS 


I THE BRADS 
I FRED A ANITA 


EDNA HEN NETT 


O’DONNELL A BLAIR 

FATTY ARBUCKLE 

In “ A DESERT HERO" 

t Organ Recital — Hurry Rodgers 

TllliiS., FRI., SAT. 

COMINO BACK BY REQUEST 
MBA UT S OF HUMANITY 
ALL NEW VAUDEVILLE 
BIG SUNDAY CONCERT 
FREE AUTO PARKING 

Dally ut 2 and 7.30. Sat. Continuous 
* 1.30 to 10.30. Tel. Camli. 500. Scats 
Reserved One Week in Advance, Ex- 
cept Sat. Spec. Mat. Price*, 11c A 17c 


Ne wton ville 

— Miss Phyllis Coombs of this village 
took part in festivities Tuesday after- 
noon at Wheaton Seminary. 

— Miss Mary Daboll and Miss Hilda 
D. Jones received their degrees as 
bachelor of arts this week at Mt. Hol- 
yoke. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Herbert E. Smith of 
33 Beaumont avenue announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Esther 
Searles to Mr. Newton E. Hyslop, son 
of Mrs. Christine Hyslop of Water- 
town street. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Allen D. Cady of 
Clyde street are attending the graduat- 
ing exercises of Smith College in 
honor of their daughter, Abbie, who is 
a graduate. Mr. and Mrs. Reuben 
Kimball of Cabot street, are also at- 
tending the graduation exercises of 
their daughter, Mary. 

— The Annual Cradle Roll party of 
the Central Church took place Wednes- 
day afternoon at the beautiful resi- 
dence of Rev. and Mrs. D. Brewer 
Eddy on Kirkstall road. Miss Mar- 
garet Strong directed affairs and Mrs. 
Merrill of Auburndale told stories of 
children in Asia Minor. 


Newt on C entre 

— Donation Day at the Mothers’ 
Rest, 8 High street, took place Thurs- 
day afternoon. 

— Mr. Burton P. Gray and his daugh- 
ter, Virginia, are spending two months 
in the Dakotas and Colorado. 

— Mr. Thomas McGregory who has 
been ill at his home on Beacon street 
for the past week is able to be out. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Willis G. Bancroft 
of 24 Loring street are receiving con- 
gratulations on the birth of a daughter. 

— Miss Louise Shaw has returned 
to her home on Cypress street after 
spending a week at Portsmouth, N. H. 

— Dr. Francis Geo. Curtis of Chest- 
nut Hill has received word that his 
son, Lieut. Edward D. Curtis has been 
awarded the Belgian croix de guerre. 

— The wedding of Miss Margaret M. 
Cutler, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Frederic F. Cutler of Hobart road, and 
Mr. Edwin Ginn will take place on 
Monday afternoon. • 

— The Union Field Day of the New- 
ton Centre churches will be held next 
Saturday at Riverside Recreation 
grounds. Cars will leave Newton 
Centre at 12.4(5 and Riverside at 7.41. 
There will be contests of different 
kinds, land and water sports, and a 
tennis tournament. Mr. R. B. Emory 
is in charge of the program. 

— Chaplain Rollins of the 101st and 
Capt. Cormerais of the Newton Com- 
pany (Co. C) of the 101st will speak 
in Trinity Church at the morning serv- 
ice next Sunday. At this service offer- 
ings and subscriptions will be re- 
ceived for a memorial for six soldiers 
who lost their lives in the war, and 
an honor roll of all who went into the 
service from the parish. The design 
provides for furnishing in oak panell- 
ing the rear end of the church, with 
deep-set seats at the back, the panels 
to contain the names of all who served 
in the war. the central member of the 
design having the six names of those 
who died in letters of red and gold, 
with carved angels in deep relief above 
them. Besides being a fitting and 
beautiful memorial, the plan will com- 
plete the Interior of the church and 
make some needed additions to the seat- 
ing capacity. The cost is estimated by 
Trving and Casson, the designers, at 
$3,000. It is hoped that the whole 
amount will be raised at the morning 
service by contributions and by sub- 
scriptions payable Oct. 1st. 


Newton Highlands 

— Mrs. German is ill at the Newton 
Hospital. 

— Thoro will be no Red Cross meet- 
ing on June 17th. 

— The Misses Webster are spending 
a few days in Now Hampshire. 

— Mrs. C. O. German is ill at the 
Deaconess Hospital in Brookline. 

— Miss Elizabeth Walker has been 
awarded senior honors at Mt. Holyoke. 

— The Linghnm family left Tuesday 
for Boxborough, Mass., for the sum- 
mer. 

— Improvements have been made on 
the Burdick residence on Lake ave- 
nue. 

— Mrs. R. Sanderson, Jr., of Floral 
street is home from the Newton Hos- 
pital. 

— Miss Marion Keeler, '20, has been 
elected to the Phi Beta Kappa at Mt. 
Holyoke. 

— M» H. Norris and family of Cam- 
bridge have been visiting friends here 
this week. 

— Miss Elizabeth Walker received 
the degree of bachelor of arts this week 
at Mt. Holyoke. 

— The Wilkinson boy of Rockledge 
road who has been ill at the hospital 
has returned home. 

— Miss Katherine Bacon of Winches- 
ter street, a teacher at Northfield, is 
home for a vacation. 

— Mr. Sanford E. Thompson has 
taken the William Shaw cottage at 
Sagamore for the summer. 

— Dr. W. P. Odell conducted the first 
quarterly conference at the Methodist 
Church Thursday evening. 

— Miss Louise M. Powell of this 
place graduated this week from the 
Wheelock School of Boston. 

— Rev. C. E. Silcox of Newport, R. 
I., will preach next Sunday morning 
,at the Congregational Church. 

— Miss Katherine S. Kingman took 
part Tuesday afternoon in the gradua- 
tion festivities at Wheaton Seminary. 

— Mrs. Arthpr Atwood has returned 
from Pennsylvania, where she has 
spent the winter with her daughter, 
Airs. Fisher. 

— The Indies of the Methodist 
Church will serve supper on the 
church lawn Thursday evening, June 
19th, at 6.30 P. M. 

— Miss Marjorie F. Keith and Miss 
Laura L. Williams of this village were 
members of the graduating class this 
week at Vassar college. 

— The Sunday School picnic with the 
Methodist and Baptist Churches of 
Upper Falls will take place at Norum 
bega Park on Saturday, June 21st. 

— The many friends of Miss Georgia 
Macleod, a Red Cross nurse in Dr. 
Balch’s Unit on the Toul sector, will be 
glad to know that she has returned to 
her home on Rockledge road. 

— Mrs. Frank L. Richardson of 
Woodward street held a bridge party 
on Wednesday for the benefit of the 
Philanthropic Fund of the Women’s 
Club. 

— Children’s Day will be observed at 
the Methodist Church next Sunday, 
June 15th. The Pastor will speak to 
the boys and girls at the morning 
service arid a concert will be given at 
7.30 in the evening. 

— Funeral services for Mr. Albert J 
Mohor, Tufts College, 1915, who died 
in Wilmington, Del., on Sunday, were 
held at his father's residence. 144 
Clarke street, on Tuesday at 3.30 F 

M., Rev. Mr. Phipps officiating. 

— On June 17, at the Hyde School 
Grounds, the people of Newton High- 
lands will extend a Community Wel- 
come Home to the men and women of 
the village who were in the various 
branches of war service. A concert 
by the Constabulary Band from two 
to three o’clock will be followed by 
an interesting program, consisting of 
speeches by Mayor Childs, Col. Law- 
ton, Capt. Cormerais, and a repsonse 
by one of the boys, patriotic exercises 
by the school children and the presen- 
tation of tokens of appreciation. Com- 
munity dancing will complete the cele- 
bration. 



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Newton Centre 

— The Newton Centre Red Cross 
closed for the summer this week 
Thursday. 

— Miss Emma Hickey of Walnut 
street has gone to Brant Rock for the 
summer. 

— Miss Gladys Sampson of Oxford 
road has gone to New Haven, Conn., 
for a week’s trip. 

— Mr. James B. Cameron of Gibbs 
street is spending a few days with 
friends at Ayer. 

— Miss Lucy M. Peabody of Grant 
aveuue leaves tomorrow for her sum- 
mer camp at Mansfield. 

— Mrs. E. T. Esterbrook of Lake 
avenue is spending a few days with 
friends at Albany, N. Y. 

— Miss Julia Gammons of Parker 
street has returned to her home after 
enjoying the past week at Pawtucket, 
It. I. 

— Miss Frances Fay who has been 
seriously ill at the hospital has re- 
turned to her home on Trowbridge 
street. 

— Mr. Alexander McIntosh of Ham- 
mond street has returned after spend- 
ing the past year with the army in 
France. 

— Mrs. Earle F. Bradbury of Paul 
Street have returned home after 
spending a month with friends at 
Nashua, N. H. 

— Mr. George Ellis who has been 
spending the past few days with 
friends at Nashua, N. H., has returned 
to his home on Gibbs street. 

— Messrs. Walter L. Jones and Way- 
land F. Vaughn of tills village have 
been elected to the Cum Luude So- 
ciety from the senior class of Phillips 
Andover Academy. 

— Extensive repairs are being made 
at the Methodist Church this summer. 
A new large pipe organ is being in- 
stalled, and in addition to this the 
pews uro all being removed and the 
carpets cleaned. 

Lower Falls 

— The residents of both sidos of the 
river are plauuing a local welcome 
homo rocoption next Tuesday after- 
noon to the men who have seen serv- 
ice In the war. Mr. Alfred Murray is 
chairman of Lho committee of arrange- 
ments und the program includes a par- 
ade at two o'clock, sports at the play- 
ground on Grove street in the after- 
noon und u bunquut und dance in the 
late afteruoou aud early evening. 


ROSE PLANTS and PANSY PLANTS 
nt 

NEWTON ROSE CONSERVATORIES 
R. C. Brldgham, Prop. 

,129 Newtonville Avenue 
Newtonville 

Telephone Newton North 194 


WEEK OF GRADUATIONS 


Waban 


(Continued from Page 1) 

gown of pale green covered with flow- 
ers of different hues. 

The bumblebee, Donald Winslow, 
was most attractive in a suit of black 
and yellow, as he visited the differ- 
ent flowers. 

Those who took part were: 

Spring — Elizabeth Retan; Violets — 
Evilda Cheng, Barbara Sprague, Aiice 
Furbish, Pauline Gilman. Frances 
Sprague, Barbara Edmands. Shirley 
Williams, Polly Gpdfrey; Rain — Rob- 
ert Sederquist; Robin — Donald Han- 
sen; Bluebird — Donald Winslow; But- 
terflies — Harriet Hanna, Jane Brown; 
Clovers — Gwendolyn McDonald, Ger- 
aldine Clark, Clarice Dennison; Dai- 
sies — Marjorie Winslow, Virginia Hen 
drie, Katherine Braith waite; Butter- 
cups — Clara MacKean, Catherine 
Brown, Ines Cabrera; Bumblebee — 
Donald Winslow. 

The May Pole Dance was unusually 
well done, all the intricate winding 
and unwinding of the May Pole being 
accomplished without a mistake and 
in perfect rhythm. The following 
took part in this dance: Erna Schmidt, 
Dorothy Campbell, Louisa Mueller, 
Marian Kirby, Mary Palmateer, Clara 
MacKean, Helen Palmateer. Elizabeth 
Retan. Ines Cabrera, Virginia Hendrie, 
Ruth Ufford, Marjorie Winslow, Kath- 
erine Braithwaite, Catherine Brown, 
Mary Elizabeth Frost, Barbara Han- 
sen. 

The last number consisted of scenes 
from Hiawatha. The poem was read 
while the scenes were being given. 
An Indian Dance preceded the scenes 
themselves, the Indians appearing in 
true Indian fashion over the brow of 
the hill uttering realistic war cries. 
The Child, Hiawatha, was taken by a 
little Chinese girl, who is in the 
school. Those taking part In ‘Hia- 
watha” were the following: 

Louise Muella, Bessie Savage, Ros- 
amund Rice, Gladys Trueman, Eliza- 
beth Pomeroy, Dorothy Campbell. 
Avis Hunt, Eleanor Faxton. 


Fessenden School 


The 13th annual contest of the 
Fessenden School of W§st Newton, 
took place onThursday evefiing. Music 
was furnished by the Mandolin Club 
consisting of Chapin, Fessenden, Mc- 
Clelland. Wells, and Williams. 

The speakers were Thomas Hunt- 
ington Chappell, subject “Democra- 
cy”; Henry Malcolm Weisel Milliken, 
subject “The Sluggard”; John Ander- 
son Thomas, subject “Song of the 
Fly”; John Edward Otterson, Jr., sub- 
ject "No Man’s Land”; George Brach- 
er Hamblin, Jr., “All Quiet Along the 
Potomac”; Courtlandt Sherrington 
Gross “Edith Cavell.” 

The first prize was w ou by George 
Bracher Hamblin, Jr„ of Wliitinsville, 
the second prize by Phillip Bradford 
Lasell of Whitinsville. 


Country Day School 


The 8th annual graduation of the 
Country Day School was held in the 
school hall Thursday afternoon. Mr. 
8. K. Kerns gave a brief review of 
the work of the school during the past 
year, and paid a beautiful tribute to 
two of his teachers who are leaving 
the school, Mr. John H. Chase, and 
Mr. Olin M. Jacobs. Mr. Chase who 
has been with the school since the 
beginning was presented with a leath- 
er arm chair by Charles K. Cummings. 
Jr., on behalf of the school. In his 
speech, Mr. Cummings said 1 that any 
course given by Mr. Chase would be 
an education. 

The speaker of the afternoon was 
Dr. John C. Ferguson and his topic 
was "Our Future Leaders.” 

The prizes were awarded as follows: 

The Houghton prize for excellence 
in English composition was won by 
Duncan C. Mann of Boston, honorable 
mention going to John C. Brewer of 
Newton. James Hurlbut of Cambridge 
was announced as the winner of the 
Cabot prize reading contest. Law 
rence O. Pratt of West Newton re- 
ceived first honorable mention, and 
Joseph G. Wheelwright of Jamaica 
Plain, second honorable mention. 

The patriotic medal offerod by the 
Society of Colonial Daughters to the 
boy in the school who made the best 
record of patriotic service from June. 
1918, to June, 1919, was awarded to 
Winthrop Wetherbee, Jr., of Boston. 

A cup known as the bird prize, and 
awarded to the boy who identifies the 
greatest number of birds during the 
year, was awarded to W. Rupert Mac- 
laurin of Cambridge, who identified 
109 species. A second prize was sent 
to David L. Garrison of West Newton 
and a bird prize in the eighth, or low- 
est class, was given to A. Weld Win- 
sor of Chestnut Hill. 

Diplomas were given to the follow- 
ing: 

John S. Amory, Boston; Henry G. 
Balch, Boston; Ronald C. Cordingley, 
Jr., Chestnut Hill; Charles K. Cum- 
mings, Jr., Boston; Peter Blair Fergu- 
son, Newton; Francis Fiske, Need- 
ham; Henry H. Fuller, Jr„ Cam- 
bridge; Edward G. Lund, Boston; 
Donald Maxwell. Brookline ;. William 
L. Payson, Brookline; Ralph E. Stu- 
art, Newton Centre; Charles Town- 
send, Boston, and Edwin S. Webster, 
Jr., Chestnut Hill. 


DIED 

CASEY— At Newton Hospital. Juno 11. 
Julia M. Casey of Brookline, aged 
30 yrs., 3 inos., 2 dys. 

STONE— At Newton Centre, Juno 9, 
Daniel C. Stone, aged 47 yrs., 7 mos., 
13 dys. 

TOLMAN— At West Newton, June 9, 
Martha A. H.. widow of Adams K. 
Tolman, aged 82 yrs., 1 mo., 19 dys. 
CONNELLY — At West Newton. Juuo (5. 
Margaret, wife of Timothy Connelly, 
aged 62 yrs., 3 mos. 

WHITMORE At Newton, June 4. 
Miss Harriet P. Whitmore, aged 77 
yrs., 1 mo., 17 dys. 

HASSETT— At Waban. June 3. Wil- 
liam F. Hassett, aged 69 yrs., 5 mos., 
9 dys. 


— Miss Ruth Guppy has been award- 
ed sophomore honors at Mt. Holyoke 
College. 

— The family of Mr. Henry Johnson 
of Pine Ridge road is summering at 
Chatham. 

—On Wednesday evening a very en- 
joyable pop concert and dance was 
held at the Neighborhood Club. 

— Men's Handicap Singles will be 
the event for June 17th on the courts 
of the Waban Neighborhood Club. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Pietro Isola of Bea- 
con street left this week for their 
summer home at North Newry, Me. 

— The Church of the Good Shep- 
herd and the Union Church will hold 
union services during the month of 
July. 

— Wednesday afternoon the children 
of Union Church, who are on the cradle 
roll and their mothers had a most 
pleasant afternoon at the church. 
There was singing and games and re- 
freshments. 

— An auto truck, owned, it is 
claimed, by W. H. Brayton, of Waban, 
and operated, it is said, by William 
Gleason collided in Watertown on 
Tuesday, with an auto truck owned by 
the Armour Co. Both cars were dam- 
aged. 

Upper Falls 

— Mr. John Collins of Pittsburg is 
visiting relatives on Hale street. 

— A daughter has been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. John Ayers of Ossipee road. 

— Miss Carolina Barret of the Insti- 
tute is visiting her brother in Mel- 
rose. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Chandler Jewett of 
High street are rejoicing over the 
birth of a daughter. 

— The Roxbury All Stars, who have 
won four out of five games, will play 
the Newton Upper Falls team here to- 
morrow. 

— Upper Falls made quite a display 
both in their decorations and in the 
large numbers which appeared to 
view the parade as it passed last Sat- 
urday through the village. 

— The officers of Stone Institute and 
Newton Home for Aged People are 
hoping a large number of friends will 
attend the annual reception and sale 
that will be held tomorrow afternoon. 


LOST and FOUND 

LOST — From Norumbega Park. 
June 5th, fawn or buff colored Cocker 
Spaniel dog answering to the name 
of “Bert”. Reward J. W. Weinberg. 
Auburndale. 

LOST — Saturday, at Norumbega 
Park, bone-rimmed glasses. Finder 
please notify A. G. R.. 14 Bowdoin St.. 
Newton Highlands. Tel. Newton So. 
881-W. 

FOR SALE 

FOR SALE— A Jewell, four burner 
gas range, in good condition. Can be 
seen at 419 Centre street, or telephone 
Newton North 1771. 

FOR SALE on Cabot St.. Newton- 
ville.— Nice single house, hot water 
heat, everything up-to-date, $5250. 
Also a first class single house, $7500, 
or would let for $75 per month. D. P. 
O’Sullivan, Real Estate and Insurance. 
286 Cabot St., Newtonville. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

J. E. BLANCHARD, Furniture and 
Piano Moving. General Trucking, 72% 
Elmwood St., Newton. Tel. N. N 
1198-M, N. N. 593- W. 

WANTED 

WANTED — A woman to cook in a 
lunch room and bakery, plain cooking, 
pleasant surroundings and steady pos- 
ition. Must come well recommended. 
Arrangements for all day or part of 
day. if desired. Apply to Newton 
Centre Dairy Lunch, 63 Union street. 
Newton Centre. 

WANTED— By a 16-year old high 
school girl, light work for the sum- 
mer. Apply at 80 Richardson street. 
Newton. 

WANTED — By experienced man; 
work as gardener and general care- 
taker. by the day or hour. Tel. New- 
ton West 1116-M. 

WANTED — Girl for general house- 
work, one who will go home nights: 
no washing. Tel. Newton North 971-M. 

WANTED — An elderly lady to 
board, one who would appreciate 
home comforts. Address “E”, Graph- 
ic Office. 

WANTED — Janitor, married man 
preferred, one experienced in running 
steam boilers; steady position for 
right man. For further particulars 
address ”W”, Graphic Office. 

WANTED — Position to assist in 
care of children, by colored girl. 15 
years old. Apply to Miss Adams, 
Temple street. West Newton. Tel. 
Newton West 498-W. 

WANTED — YD ex-service man (24 
years old) would like to get general 
position of some kind for the summer. 
Can drive auto, has had sales experi- 
ence. Furnish the highest recommen- 
dations in civil and army life. Ad- 
dress "S. M..” Graphic Office. 

WANTED — If any one has a piano 
in good condition (oak case preferred) 
that they wish to place in a private 
family in Newton for storage, Aug. 1st. 
whore it will be well taken care of, 
kindly address, R. D. F., Newton 
Graphic, Newton. 

WANTED— Boarding homes for 
babies, within fifteen miles of Boston, 
where intelligent care will be given. 
Good locality and good sanitary con- 
ditions required. Address Miss Mary 
&. Doran. Boston Children's Aid So- 
ciety, 43 Hawkins street, Boston. 

WANTED— Small suite of 5 to 7 
rooms, luodorn. or would like smull 
house in good location, June or July 
1st. Address R., Graphic Office. 


WANTED— A neat girl, 16 or 17, as 
mother's helper to assist in light 
house-work uud the care of two chil- 
dren. Can go home nights. Tel. New- 
tou North 2646-W. 



Deposits Draw Interest 
From July 1 0tlr 


TiaadKYD h 

CARPENTER and CABINET MAKER 
Telephone 2150 Newton North 
Jobbing Promptly Attended To 
Residence: 

11 Rossmere Rd., Newtonville 

Telephone 2844-W Newton North 


LostSavings Bank Books 

Savings Bank Books aa listed bsiow 
are lost and application has been mad* 
for payments of the accounts In accord- 
ance with Sec. 40. Chap. 590, of the Acte 
of 1908 and amendments. 

Newton Saving* Bank Book No. 459.14. 
Newton Saving* Bank Book No. 16175 


TO LIT 


FOR RENT — At Auburndale. second 
floor apartment. 6 rooms, bath. Ad- 
dress 42 Maple St.. Auburndale. Tel. 
898-W Newton West, evenings. 


TO LET — In Newtonville, 1 large 
furnished room in private family for 
business men only. Tel. Newton No. 
1385. 


FOR RENT — In Newtonville, after 
Sept,. 1st. room in private family. Tel. 
Newton North 912-R. 


TO LET — A tenement of 7 rooms at 
23 Richardson St.. Newton. Inquire 
at 27 Richardson St., after June 16. 


ROOM TO RENT — To business wo- 
man or man in refined neighborhood; 
all modern conveniences; near steam 
and electric cars. Phone Newton No. 
2112-M. 


A LADY having a cozy home would 
let a front room, large closet. Busi- 
ness people preferred. Handy to the 
cars. Reference. Address Graphic 
Office, "P. J." 


FOR RENT — Two pleasant rooms 
suitable for gentleman alone or light 
housekeeping. 39 Wesley street. 
Newton. 


For Summer Rental 

Bungalow of 7 rooms, house and 
grounds in excellent condition, mod- 
ern conveniences of every description. 
Cool, quiet, exclusive neighborhood. 
Price $240 for 3 months, which in- 
cludes care of lawn, water, gas. tele- 
phone, and electricity. Tel. Fort Hill 
3207. 


Harwiehport Cottage 

For Rent Until July 21 

Bungalow style, furnished, four sleeping 
rooms, within five minutes of pine grove 
and shore. Address X. 3.. Graphic Office. 

Notice Is Hereby Given that the 
subscriber has been duly appointed 
executrix of the will of Albert A. Sav- 
age. late of Newton in the County of 
Middlesex, deceased, testate, and has 
taken upon herself that trust by giv- 
ing bond, as the law directs. 

All persons having demands upon 
the estate of said deceased are herein- 
required to exhibit the same; and all 
persons indebted to said estate are 
called upon to make payment to 

CORNELIA M. SAVAGE. 

Executrix. 

(Address) 

Brooks Ave.. 

Newtonville, Mass. 

April 21, 1919. 

June 13-20.27. 


WOODLAND 

PARK 

A Boarding School for Girls and 
a Country Day School for Girls, 
and for Boys under ten. 

The Junior Department of Lasell 
Seminary 

Located in attractive and com- 
fortable building formerly known 
as the Woodland Park Hotel. 
Kindergarten, Primary and 
Grammar Grades 
Conversational French, Music 
with supervised practice. Drawing, 
Sewing, Folk and Social Dancing 
and Deportment, Swimming and 
Riding; Individual attention. An 
abundance of good wholesome 
food, fresh air. exercise and sleep. 
Visitors Always Welcome 
Come and see the school and 
talk over the problem. For cata- 
log address 

GUY M. WINSLOW, 
Auburndale, Mass. 

Phone 

Newton West 630 


TEACHERS 


L. EDWIN CHASE 

Taacher of 

Violin Mandolin Guitar 

Will Beeelvs Pupils After Oct. It At His 
NEW STUDIO 
• 15 WASHINGTON' STREET 
(Opp. R. R. Station) 

N K WTO N V ILL E 

Telephone: Newton West 1MS-M 

ADDRESS : 2202 COMMONWEALTH AVE.. AiBURNOAiE 


INSURE 

your 

FURNITURE 

with 

ROWE & PORTER 

(Sidney R. Porter) 

100 MILK STREET. BOSTON 
Tel. Main 7530 


Notice Is hereby given that the sub- 
scriber has been duly appointed exe- 
cutor of the will of Ann W. Lane, also 
known as Annie W. Lane. Annie W. 
R. I<ane, and Annie R. Lane, late of 
Newton, in the County of Middlesex, 
deceased, testate, and has taken upon 
himself that trust by giving bond, as 
the law directs. All persons having 
demands upon the estate of said de- 
ceased are hereby required to exhibit 
the same; aud all persons indebted to 
said estate are called upon to make 
payment to 

HERBERT R. LANE. Executor. 

34 Chauncy St., Uostou. Mass. 

June 12, 1919. 

June 13-20-27. 


BOOKKEEPER 

Accuracy, rapidity and naatwoM as 

soQtlul. Alust have thorough knowl- 
edge of double entry and write an 
A-L hand. Apply in person or tele- 
phone betweeii 12 and 1 noon, Welles- 
ley LOS, lo NOW toil Koo Co., Newtou 
Lower Falls. 


W. H. WALLACE, Builder 

36 Yernon SL, Newton 
N. N. 76S-J 

Remodeling. Rooting und Jobbing 
promptly attended to 
Orders takeu at 744 Elmwood St. 

N. N. 593- W 

MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF 
REAL ESTATE 


By virtue of a power of sale con- 
tained in a mortgage deed from George 
C. Olson to the Fitchburg Co-operative 
Bank, dated September 5, 1918, and 
noted on Transfer Certificate of title 
No. 914$. Book 61 Page 577 of the Land 
Court Records of the Middlesex South 
District Registry of Deeds, said mort- 
gage being filed with said Records as 
Document No. 2500S, and for breach of 
the condition of said mortgage deed, 
and for the purpose of foreclosing the 
same, will be sold at public auction on 
the premises hereinafter described on 
Saturday. July 5. 1919, at three o'clock 
in the afternoon, all and singular the 
real estate conveyed by said mortgage 
deed, viz: A certain tract of land with 
the buildings thereon, situated in New- 
ton. Middlesex County. Massachusetts, 
and bounded northerly by Rogers 
Street 38.59 feet; northeasterly by 
land now or formerly of Josiah J. 
White 131.20 feet; southerly by lot No. 
13 B on the plan hereinafter mentioned 
121.29 feet ; and westerly by lot No. 14 
on said plan 101.84 feet. Said parcel 
is shown as lot 13 A on said plan. All 
of said boundaries are as showu on a 
subdivision plan, as approved by the 
Court, filed In the office of the Land 
Court, a copy of which is filed iu the 
Registry of Deeds for the South Regis- 
try District of Middlesex Couuty iu 
Registration Book 45 Page 277, with 
Certificate No. 66S4. 

The premises will be sold subject to 
any unpaid taxes or assessments. 
Terms: $200 cash at the time aud piuce 
of sale, and balance within ten days 
thereafter at the bauking rooms of the 
mortgagee ou delivery of deed. 
FITCHBURG COOPERATIVE BANK 
Mortgagee. 

By John W. Parshlev. Tread. 
Fitchburg. Mass., June 10, 1919. 

June 13-20 27. 



THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 1913. 



9 


723 BOYLSTON STREET 
BOSTON 

READY TO WEAR SPECIALTY SHOP 

% 

Telephone 2526 Back Bay 


Last Reduction Sale 

of 

SPRING STOCK 

Suits . . . 20 to 35% les 

Capes and Coats 20 to 35% les 
Dresses . . 10 to 20% les 


LOVELY NEW SUMMER 
DRESSES, SUITS and WAISTS 


Telephone, Beach 7573 W. G. Weeber, Mgr. 

LINCOLN CARE COMPANY 

HOUSE CLEANINC 

Cleaning, Painting, Kalsomining, Window Washing, 
Renovation of Rugs and Carpets 
In fact all work incidental to proper care of any estate 
119 LINCOLN STREET, - - - BOSTON, MASS. 


Removal Notice 

Merchant’s Co-operative Bank 

of Boston 

Will Occupy New Quarters at 

51 Cornhill 

AFTER JULY 1ST 
Owing to Increase of Business 


INSTRUCTION IN LANGUAGES 
AND MATHEMATICS 

Two Dollars an Hour 
EDWARD H. CUTLER 
13 Linder Terrace, Newton 


HERMANN SULZEN 

VIOLIN TEACHER AND SOLOIST 
Term*, $2.00 per Lmwo 
Avulluble for Social Affairs 
10 NONANTLM STREET NEWTON 

Tel. Newton North 757-R 


EDITH A. CUSHING 

CUSTOM CORSETS TO ORDER 

Altered or Repaired 
110 TREMONT ST„ BOSTON 
Telephone Fort Hill 2149 



WHEEL CHAIRS 


The Largest Selection in New England 

SICK ROOM REQUISITES 

of Every Description 

F. H. THOMAS CO. 

689-601 Bojlston Street, Boston 

Tel. Back Bay 1196 


VERI-BRITE 

The Polish Everybody Is Using 
Once Used Always Used 
Trial Bottle 35c 

Your Nearest Dealer 
or 

THE LINWOOD CO. 

10 Cornhill, Boston 


Tel's Back Bay 53628, 70877 
Hours 3 A. M. to 4 P. M. Dally 
Saturday 9 A. M. to 1 P. M. 

Boston Employment Agency 

Licensed 

Established 29 Years 
MRS. H. G. PRESTON, Manager 

Sri’KItloK HOUSEHOLD, HOTEL and 
INSTITUTION HELP OF ALL KINDS 
«74 BOYLSTON STREET. BOSTON, MASS. 


FLAG POLE 

Derrick, Spar, Tent, Pike and 
Bean Poles, Cedar Posts. 

Also Spruce and Oregon Spars, 
all lengths 

BOSTON FLAG POLE CO. 

169 Broadway Extension 
South Boston TcL S<w Boston 112 


8. C. Bulbullau 


Tel. Beach 711 


Oriental Rug Works 

cwnlng. Stretching and Repairing of 
AU Kinds 

Hogs and Needle Art Works 
by Armenian Experts 
« BOYLSTON HT., HOHTON, MASS. 
Room 7*5 

Residence, Auburndale — TsL Con. 


WOMEN’S CLUBS 


Grace M. Burt, Editor. 


AFTERMATH OF THE STATE FED- 
ERATION CONVENTION 


74 SADDLE 

and family horses, Including two pairs, 
chestnuts and bays; one handsome 
pony and fine outfit for children. 

J. D. PACKARD & SONS CO., 

29 Brighton Ave„ Allston 


WANTED 

All kinds of Ladles’ and Gentlemen’s 
cast-off clothing, furs, jewelry, hooks, 

etc. 

MRS. MONAHAN 
27.1 Tremout Street, Boston 

Telephone Beach 0742 


BRUCE R. WARE, B. C. S. 

1M CHURCH ST., NEWTON. MJ 
BOSTON OFFICE : No. 6 BEACON STREET 

Telephone 11*7 market *555 

Public Accountant 

Books Openad, Closed and Adjusted 
Auditing of Corporation and Mercantile 
Accounts A HoeclalUr 



Nobody but yourself knows 
you are wearing bifocals when 
you wear KUYFTOKS. 


A Convenient Service 

We keep a complete and permanent record 
of the eyesight requirements of our patrons. 

If you break your lenses, simply telephone 
or drop us a card and new lenses will bs made 
fur you at once. 

HOMER'S OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

WM. S. SCHAFFER, Reg. Optometrist 
Formerly with Andrew J. Lloyd Co. 

45 WINTER ST., BOSTON 
Ooi remute Iron Puk md Cambridge Subways 


“Smile, smile, smile,” from the pop 
ulnr war song, must have been making 
Its groove in the brains of the club 
women during the past year or more 
or they never could have smiled so 
serenely as they did during the torrid 
days at South Hadley last week. To 
he sure the heat was not confined to 
that town and doubtless the delegates 
were fully as comfortable as they 
would have been at home and certainly 
much more so than in some closely 
crowded hall in any city of the state, 
yet their good nature through it all 
was a matter of favorable comment. 

One of the college professors told 
some of her students who were com- 
plaining of the heat. “Just go down 
and see those women.” So the Federa- 
tion earned a reputation for enduring 
in good humor what could not be 
cured. 

It was a hot and dirty trainload of 
club women who landed in Holyoke 
that Tuesday afternoon, but the trol- 
ley ride to South Hadley served to re- 
fresh them and whatever inconveni- 
ences in the way of accommodations 
were encountered they were put up 
with good naturedly and the delegates 
loft town two days later feeling that 
even though it had been hot. they had 
had a good time, that appointments 
had been all that could be desired, the 
meetings themselves full of interest 
and the hospitality of Mount Holyoke 
College most cordial, while the beauty 
of the campus and of the Student 
Alumnae Hall, in particular, and the 
friendly, responsive spirit of the girls 
will remain as a pleasant memory. 

Tuesday evening found Student 
Alumnae Hall well filled for the eve- 
ning session. After the usual wel- 
come, given this time by President 
Mary E. Woolley, and the response by 
Mrs. Gurney came the reports of the 
Federation officers. The College Glee 
Club led by Miss Dorothy Whitton de- 
lighted the delegates, especially the se- 
lections having a real college flavor. 
Miss Woolley’s address on "The College 
Woman in the Community.” full of in- 
spiration and the call to duty for wo- 
men with special privilege, closed that 
session. 

Wednesday was a full day with re- 
ports from most of the departments 
summarizing their work for the year, 
with the election, the luncheon, the 
presentation of five new clubs and the 
reports of special committees delayed 
from the previous evening, not to men- 
tion the securing of tickets for the re- 
turn trip. Probably nearly six hun- 
dred were in attendance during that 
day. for in addition to the three hun- 
dred-odd women quartered in South 
Hadley and in Holyoke, automobiles 
flocked in from all the nearby towns 
for the day and picnic parties upon the 
campus were a not infrequent sight, 
while more than 500 partook of the 
luncheon served in the Wilbur Banquet 
Hall in the basement of the building. 

It was orf Wednesday afternooon 
that the announcement was made of 
the passage by the United States Sen- 
ate of the Susan B. Anthony amend- 
ment. The news was received with 
hearty applause hv a majority of the 
audience. but with no undue exalta- 
tion. Mrs. Gurney in making the an- 
nouncement took occasion to open her 
mouth upon the subject, which she 
said she had kept in abevance during 
the three years of her administration 
and thanked God that the time had 
come when women should share an 
equal responsibility with the men In 
the affairs of the government. 

A glimpse of college life was had in 
the early evening through the campus 
sing on the steps of Skinner Hall when 
college songs popular with the students 
were sung including a Serenade to the 
Federation, as well as patriotic airs. 
At the close they circled about the 
South Campus enclosing the groups of 
onlookers while they sang their final 
number. 

From the address of Mrs. Gurney at 
the morning chapel service to the clos- 
ing address of the evening by Capt. 
Andre Morize the day was full of good 
things, the delegates feeling that they 
must not lose a moment for fear of 
missing something. Capt. Morize 
brought inspiration to his hearers in 
the ideals of France and their very 
real appreciation of their debt to Amer- 
ica. He warned them not to he too 
conciliatory toward Germany. “For 
France.” he said, “cannot hold out the 
clean hands of her victory to those 
hands of defeat which are not clean.” 

At the reception which followed 
there was opportunity for meeting both 
the president of the College and of the 
Federation and Capt. Morize. A very 
pretty feature of the evening was the 
procession of the student ushers each 
with a bouquet of flowers, the gifts of 
clubs and Individuals to Mrs. Gurney 
and to Mrs. Hawley, the retiring clerk. 

Thursday morning found a few ar- 
dent delegates up at dawn, or what 
seemed to be. for the bird walk around 
one of the lakes which the college is 
so fortunate to possess. The beauty of 
the woods, the notes of the many birds 
and the early mist rising from the 
water made a lasting impression upon 
their minds. Again many delegates 
were seen at the chapel service led this 
time by President Woolley. The morn- 
ing session embraced the final reports, 
the presentation of the new officers, the 
closing address of Mrs. Gurney, the re- 
tiring president, and the opening ad- 
dress of Mrs. George Minot Baker, the 
newly elected president. 

Among the resolutions passed was 
one recommended by the General Fed- 
eration favoring the advisability of 
periodic physical examination of 
adults, since middle-life mortality is 
greater in the United States than in 
any other civilized community; one ex- 
pressing the admiration and love 
among the members of the Federation 
for Mrs. Claire H. Gurney, the retiring 
president ; the usual courtesy resolu- 
tions and one urging the United Stutes 
Senate to vote for ratification of the 
Peace Treaty and the League of Na- 
tions. 

In her closing uddress Mrs. Gurney 
urged the women to think wisely, see 
clearly, and he at harmony. “Har- 
mony and peace when not bought at 
the expense of principle should he the 
motto of the Federation.” 

Several Newton women have been * 
elected to serve the Federation (luring 


the coming year, Mrs. Francis E. Stan- 
ley as a trustee of the Endowment 
Fund, Mrs. Fred H. Tucker a director 
for threo years, and Miss Anna M. 
Whiting a member of the nominating 
committee. Two Newton clubs were 
presented for membership, the Newton 
Upper Falls Woman’s Club and the 
Newton Community Club. 

With this meeting is closed the war 
service of the club women as a Federa- 
tion. They have met the test in a very 
splendid way and they will not be 
found wanting in the great reconstruc- 
tion period which is ahead. 


“INTRUDE KS IN FAIRYLAND” 


Last Saturday Jolly Hollow, the 
residence of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Burn- 
ham on Brncebridge road, Newton 
Centre, was again n scene of Fairy- 
land, when the Newton Girl Scouts, 
under the direction of their loader, 
Miss Priscilla Ordway. assisted by 
Miss Hazel Sands and Mrs. E. W. Var- 
ney, gave “Intruders in Fairyland,” 
the use of which was granted them by 
the courtesy of Mrs. E. L. Gulick of 
the Aloha Camps. 

The Princess danced her dainty 
bubble dance, and frolicked with her 
fairy love, Swift Wing, until a group 
of Girl Scouts drove them away to 
hide in a big hollow tree. As the girls 
disappeared on their hike, the fairies 
ventured 1 forth and Swift Wing went 
his way to announce the midnight rev- 
els of the queen. Then came the 
wicked Will-o’-the-wisp and with most 
impish and alluring of dances enticed 
away the Fairy Princess to his cave 
under the lake. 

Act 2 found little Glee and Trill 
dancing, swinging, and decorating the 
queen’s throne, then as midnight 
drew near all the fairy bands assem- 
bled while Puck played jokes for 
them. At last the queen herself ar- 
rived only to hear the terrible news 
that the Princess was lost and that 
mortals were seen -near her just be- 
fore her disappearance. Grandmother 
Magic was then summoned. She call- 
ed upon Robin Hood and his Merry 
men as the best advisers for though 
they were mortal, they understood 
fairies. He suggested capturing the 
captain of the scout band, but before 
this could be done the Princess her- 
self returned leading two scouts who 
just ns she was about to be drawn 
in under the lake jumped to her res- 
cue and saved her. Both scouts wore 
swimming merit badges. 

The queen overcome with gratitude 
invited all loyal scouts to enjoy Fairy- 
land whenever they wished to and 
also introduced them to the spirit of 
Nature who dwells in the very heart 
of Fairyland. 

Miss Frances Varney’s solo dance 
as the Spirit of Nature made an ex- 
ceptionally beautiful climax and end- 
ing to the little masque. The Mist 
Fairies were dressed in pearl gray 
gowns with scarfs of irridescent col- 
ors. They represented the mist on 
the edge of a shower when the sun 
shines through. The Water Sprites 
came from the lake, their skirts show- 
ing the green of the water grasses, 
their tunics, the deep blue of mid- 
lake, while each wore a pond lily 
woven into her tresses. The little 
flowers bobbed about in leaf green 
gowns and dainty flower-tinted caps, 
while their courtly followers, the 
ferns, wore green tunics and capes, 
and ferns like plumes in their caps. 

Those who took part in the play 
were as follows: 

Elizabeth Plympton, Marie Farrow, 
Edith Talbot, Frances Varney. Nar- 
cissa Varney, Ellen Chase, Eleanor 
Young. Carotin Cummings, Priscilla 
Bond. Faith Additon, Eleanor Phillips, 
Nancy Richmond. 

The Girl Scouts ware Captain Pris- 
cilla Ordway, Lieutenant Mrs. W. J. 
Hodges, Scouts Margaret Williams, 
Elizabeth Groves, Virginia White, 
Margaret Rising, Katherine Osgood, 
Margaret Hill, Nina Maconi, Virginia 
Gray, Grace Merriam, Hope Corken, 
Virginia Williams, Ruth Robbins, Eliz- 
abeth Daniels, May Wheelwright, Eve- 
lyn Perry. Merrian White, Elizabeth 
Donovan, Merriam McLean, Gertrude 
Merriam. Margaret Pettigrew, Kather- 
ine Rising. Adelaide • Hawes, Ruth 
Darling. Dorothea Callowhill, Guen- 
dolyn Underhill, Alice Fellows, Alice 
Scott, Florence Cox, Cornelia Ander- 
son, Virginia Hapgood, Elizabeth 
Noyes, Ernestine Wilder, Esther New- 
ell, Margaret Noble, Clara Smith, 
Beryl Smith, Genevieve Tyler, Muriel 
McClelland, Joan Burnham, Helen 
Sage, Ruth Rudd, Ruth Pearson, 
Louise Paul, Dorothy McAdams, 
Gretehen Cooke, Faith Stone, Kather- 
ine Lotz. Eifrida Kevorkian, Dorothy 
Hammeil, Marion Blackman, Geral- 
dine Longwell, Mary Bond, Anna 
Kieser, Rita McClelland, Barbara 
Pease, Mary Jeanne Howman, Helen 
Washburn, Barbara Hills, Helen Stu- 
art, Elizabeth Hawes, Mary Holbrook. 


CHILDREN’S PAGEANT 


(Continued from Page 1) 


Violets — Ethel Muriel. Anna Jordan, 
Sylvia Parks, Florence King. 

Dandelions — Ruth Donahue, EDlon 
Gulon, Margaret Webber, Gertrude 
Ward, Ruby Chapman. 

Tulips — Helen Thompson, Amelia 
Feola, Eunico Dargon, Mary Robart, 
Nancy Mandell, Dorothy Taylor. 

Butterflies — Carolyn Hodgson, Mar- 
jorie Hoddor, Jean Murray, Joyce Wel- 
ler. 

Attendants — Hamilton Young, Wal- 
ter Warren, Charles Smith, Jack 
Alden. 

Bees — John Robinson, Calvin Mich- 
aels, Harold Jennings, Malcolm Hatch, 
Clifford Pratt, Herbert Leavitt. 

The second number on the program 
was a May- Pole Dance in which 18 
children took part dancing in a cir- 
cle about the May-pole in the centre 
of the lawn. The girls wore pink 
caps, the boys pink scarfs. The fol- 
lowing took part in the May-pole 
dance: 

Rachel Kent, Dorothy Dale, Vir- 
ginia Annis, Mary Cole, Helen Jones, 
Betty Fitts, Barbara Fuller, Virginia 
McAleer, Nancy Mandell, William 
Clark, Daniel Goodridge, George Def- 
ren, Wendell Gallagher, Howard 
Pierce, George King, Frances Gleason, 
Herbert Fox, James Waters. 

The third number was a Jazz Band 
by the Kindergarten. The instru- 
ments used were tiny drums, bells and 
triangles accompanied by the piano. 
This was a most interesting number. 
William Barba standing on a minia- 
ture grand-stand made a most effect- 
ive band master, keeping time with 
true rhythm. Nat Hope, one of the 
drummers, led the march at the open- 
ing of the program. In addition to 
the Jazz Band, the Kindergarten also 
gave two Mother Goose Dances. 

Following these, the whole school 
danced five folk dances, in three sec- 
tions on the lawn. The children in 
their different colors made a pretty 
sight. 

The program concluded with the 
salute to the flag and the singing of 
the “Star Spangled Banner.” The flag 
bearers, two soldiers and two sailors, 
were Baldwin Pearson, Donald Bisch- 
off, Louis Michaels, and Wellington 
Pratt. 

The teachers in charge of the pro- 
gram were Miss Mary Higgins, Miss 
Grace O’Donnell, Miss Ethel Weeks. 
Miss Louise Pray, and Miss Ruth 
Page. 


NOIUMBEGA PARK 


“Officer 666,” that crisp, sparkling 
farce, will delight patrons of the big 
open-air theatre at Norumbega Park 
next week. The Liberty Players will 
give performances daily. These ex- 
cellent artists have won hosts of 
friends, and their fine work never 
lacks enthusiastic applause. New ad- 
ditions are constantly being made to 
tlie zoo, which houses the largest col- 
lection of wild animals in New Eng- 
land, and t he beautiful lagoon of birds 
is a never-ending source of delight to 
the little folks. Concerts by a ladies' 
orchestra, canoeing on the Charles, 
and the spacious athletic field and pic- 
nic grounds are other attractive fea- 
tures. 


GARDEN PLAYTHINGS NEEDED 


The Newton Circle and Welfare 
Bureau are in need of a baby carriage, 
a wooden garden swing, a see saw and 
a variety of outdoor toys, such as lit 
tie carts, halls, etc. Will any one uble 
to contribute such articles kindly 
conimuntcute with Miss Helen F. Hull, 
29 Ivunhoo street, N. N. 1214-M. 

Blankets are also needed. 



DIAMONDS 


*41 SUMMER ST. BOSTON- 


Y. M. C. A. 


Last Sunday afternoon even though 
the weather was too cold for the out- 
door sei vice on the Y. M. C. A. field, 
a large number came out to hear Dean 
Nathan E. Wood of the Gordon Bible 
College, of Boston. Singing was a 
feature of the meeting. A male quar- 
tet gave two selections, and the or- 
chestra of 12 young men led tile 
singing. 

Next Sunday, if the weather is warm 
and fair, the meeting will be Jield out- 
side, if stormy In the Y. M. C. A. 
lobby. All welcome! The speaker 
will be Rev. Newton E. Merritt. 

Frank A. Day ('amp 

Naturally the committee in charge 
of the Frank A. Day Camp are greatly 
pleased with the large enrolment for 
the season of 1919. The capacity of 
the camp has been doubled this year, 
and yet it looks as if it would be im- 
possible to accommodate all the boys 
who want to come. 

The camp opens June 27th. 

Tennis Courts 

The tennis courts are in great de- 
mand these days. There is nothing 
quite so beneficial to the tired brain 
worker as a snappy set of tennis, a 
shower, and a dip in the swimming 
pool. Take out a summer member- 
ship, join the tennis club, and play as 
often as you want. 

Baseball and Athletic Meet 

The Baseball team plays Boston Y. 
M. C. A. at 2 o’clock next Saturday. 
June 14th on the Y. M. C. A. field 
Please note the early hour. At 4 
o’clock will be held an athletic meet 
in which Association of Greater Bos- 
ton will participate. Many service 
men are expected to take part al- 
though the meet is open for any ath 
lete. The events are 100, 220, 440 yd', 
dash, and 880 and 1 mile runs, run- 
ning high and running broad jumps, 
shot put and relay race. 


CLASSICAL HIGH SCHOOL 


The Baccalaureate Sermon to the 
senior class will be preached Sunday 
morning, June 15, at 10.30 by the Rev. 
Edward M. Noyes, pastor of the New- 
ton Centre Congregational Church. It 
is earnestly hoped that the class will 
attend in as large numbers as pos- 
sible. 

Each senior has received five tickets 
for graduation, two of which are re- 
served. Recitations for seniors ended 
on Wednesday. Thursday and Friday 
mornings will be given over to the 
practice of the graduation program. 

The senior class needs about a hun- 
dred dollars in addition to what was 
received from the senior play to pay 
for the bronze memorial tablets which 
are to be the gift of the class to the 
school. Although this money will not 
be solicited it is hoped that any New- 
ton citizens who are interested in the 
erection of such a memorial will con- 
tribute. The memorials will be de 

signed by Dallen tin; soulptor and will 
be placed in a suitable position in one 
of the hallways. 

The girls’ tennis team won the first 
game of the season from Brookline 
High 2 to 1 on Wednesday. In the 
singles Betty Boutelle beat Regina 
Bachen of Brookline 6 — 1, 6 — 1, and 
Catherine Walsh of Brookline beut 
Priscilla Mayo 7 — 6, 6 — 4. In the dou 
hies, Dorothy Dunmore and Kather 
ine Holmes beat K. Hickey and G 
Moore of Brookline 6 — 3, 3 — 6, 6 — 4. 


NEWTON EQUAL SUFFRAGE 
LEAGUE 


The aiinuul meeting of the Newton 
Equal Suffrage League will he held at 
tlie home of Miss Anna M. Whiting, 11 
Washington street, Newton, Friday 
June 20, at 3 P. M. After the reports 
and election of officers there will be a 
speuker and pluus will be rnude for 
the ratification of the Anthony Amend 
meut to the constitution. 


United ate tee Food Administration No. 0-0716! 

E. E. GRAY CO. 


Newtonville 
West Newton 


Newton Highlands 
Newton Upper Falls 
Newton Centre 


33% Saved on Groceries 

CUTS FOR WEEK COMMENCING JUNE 16 

CORN FLAKES, “Gold Medal”, pkg. 9c 

BEANS, California, Small White, per tb 10c 

LIME JUICE, Fine Domestic, large bottle 25c 

PEAS, Wisconsin Sweets, can 14c 

SALMON, Columbia River, “Bow Knot” tall can 25c 

BAKED BEANS, “Gold Seal” 2 cans 25c 

GRAPE JUICE, pint bottle 35c 

quart bottle 65c 

CIDER VINEGAR, full quart bottle 18c 

SARDINES, California, (in Olive Oil) can 18c 

SOAP, Export Borax, 5 bars for 23c 

MARSHMALLOW CREAM, (for frosting) each 12c and 28c 

KETCHUP, Grayco Brand, large bottle 23c 

SHRIMP, Spring Pack, can 15c 

EVAPORATED MILK, Everyday Brand, can 14c 


LUDWIG FURS 









NEW MODELS FOR FALL AND WINTER OF 1919 
NOW READY 


Maternity 
Gowns 

Skirts 

Smocks 
Petticoats 

FULL LINE 

Summer Dresses 

Maternity Corsets, 
Brassieres, Ruffles 

Miss Creed 

7 Temple Place, Boston 


A 





Oriental 
Tea Company 

85-87 Court Street, Scoilay Sq. 
BOSTON 

“Sign of Big Gold Tea Kettle” 
NOTED FOR ITS 

Quality COFFEES 
Quality TEAS 

Only Exclusive Tea and Coffee 
House in New England 

50 Years In the Same Location 

Our Teas and Coffees Are Dependable 

Mall and Telephone orders given 
special attention. 


The School 
Specializing in 
Business Efficiency 

Macdonald 
Commercial School 

Stenography, Typewriting 
and Bookkeeping 

30 Boylston St., Boston 

LITTLE BUILDING 
Tel. Beach 4822 


Children’s Hair Gutting 

Young Women’s Hair “Bobbed” 
Marcel Wave, Shampooing and 
Facial Massage 

Individual attention given by . 
experts 

SALONE Dl PIACERE 

Joseph A. Merenda, Prop. 
Formerly with Leading Hair 
Cutting Parlors of Boston 

Room 714 Blake Bldg. 

59 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON • 
Tel. Beach 1133 


Miss MacConnell 

Ilalr Dressing, Face Treatment 
Manicure, Chiropody, Toilet Article* 
Moles, W arts and Superfluous Hair Remodel 

429 CENTRE STREET 
Over Hubbard's Pharmacy 


HIGHEST PRICES 

Paid for bonds, diamonds, emeralds, I 
pearls, jewelry, platinum, old gold aad’ I 
sliver; Coll. Loan tickets bought andT 
loaned on; see us before selling. J. < 
ROY, 77 Hummer St., Boaton. Room 51. ] 
Eat. 16 years; bank ref. 



For 

Table Water 
of 

Delicious 

Purity 

and 

Exceptional 

Softneas 


Nobscot Spring Water 


meets all the requirements. A health-giving necessity for 
every day in the year. Bottled and sealed at the spring in 
Framingham, Mass. 

Your Grocer Can Supply You 
If his policy is not to accommodate customers, advise us 
and we will give you names of grocers in your vicinity who 
are accommodating. 

Arrangements may be made to have Nobscot Water de- 
livered also at your summer home. 

Nobscot Mt. Spring Company 

Established 1892 

173 MILK STREET - - - BOSTON, MASS. *1 

Telephone Fort Hill 860 





TIIE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 1919. 


7 



BRACELET WATCHES 

FOR GRADUATES 

Extensive assortment of the popular small size Waltham, 
Elgin, Illinois and Hamilton models in 14k gold and 25 
year gold filled, at prices from $20 to $75 

Latest style watches for young men, Waltham, Elgin, 
Hamilton and Illinois movements, at prices from $15 to $40 


-The E. B. Horn Co.- 


ESTABLISHED IN 1839 

429 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON 


omnion wealth of Massachusetts, 
dlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


the heirs-at-law, next of kin and all 
ther persons interested in the estate 
f Alvin H. Clifford late of Newton 
n said County, deceased: 
VHEREAS, a certain instrument 
porting to be the last will and tes- 
-ent of said deceased has been pre- 
ted to said Court, for Probate, by 
ul Clifford who prays that letters 
tamentary may be issued to him, 
executor therein named, without 
ing a surety on his official bond. 

'ou are hereby cited to appear at a 
bate Court, to be held at Cam- 
’ge in said County of Middlesex, on 
sixteenth day of June A. I). 1919, 
hine o’clock in the forenoon, to show 
se, if any you have, why the same 
uld not be granted, 
nd said petitioner is hereby direct- 
to give public notice thereof, by 
blisliing this citation once in each 
bk, for three successive weeks, in the 
wton Graphic a newspaper published 
Newton the last publication to be 
e day, at least, before said Court, 
d by mailing postpaid, or delivering 
copy of this citation to aH known 
sons interested in the estate, seven 
's at least before said Court. 
Witness, Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
re, First Judge of said Court, this 
enty-third day of May in the year 
e thousand nine hundred and nine- 

F. M. ESTY, Register, 
y 30-June 6-13. 

ORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL 
ESTATE 


y virtue of the power of sale con- 
ined in a certain mortgage deed 
eu by Patrick L. O’Leary to A. 
exander Achorn, dated February 
th, 1909, and recorded with Middle- 
(So. Dist.) Deeds, Book 3434, Page 
2, for breach of the conditions con- 
ned in said mortgage, and for the 
rpose of foreclosing the same, will 
sold at public auction, upon the 
emises described in said mortgage, 
Saturday, June 28th, 1919, at two 
lock in the afternoon, all and sin- 
la£ ih(* premises described in said 
Ogage, viz.: A certain parcel of 
d with the buildings thereon situ- 
ed in Newton in the County of Mid- 
~sex and Commonwealth of Massa- 
usetts being lot numbered Twenty- 
e on a plan of “Building Lots on 
alnut Hill, Newton, Mass.,” dated 
ly 1906. to be recorded with Middle- 
x (South District) Deeds and bound- 
as follows: — 

Westerly by Walnut Hill Road sev- 
ty-five feet; Northerly by lot num- 
red Twenty on said plan one hun- 
ed thirty-three and 49-100 feet; 
sterly by lot numbered Twenty-two 
said plan seventy-five feet; South- 
ly by Parker Avenue one hundred 
irty-three and 49-100 feet. Contain- 
£ ninety-nine hundred and eighty 
uare feet. Said premises will be 
nveyed subject to the taxes assessed 
of April 1, 1919, and to municipal 
ns and assessments, if any. 

One hundred dollars will be re- 
ired to be paid in cash by the pur- 
ser at the time and place of sale; 
her terms at sale. 

A. ALEXANDER ACHORN, 
Mortgagee. 

Tremont St., Boston, 
m. 917. 

ne 6-13-20. 

MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL 
ESTATE 


By virtue of the power of sale con- 
ined in a certain mortgage deed 
ven by William Dennis Murphy to 
. Alexander Achorn, dated March 
th, 1909, and recorded with Middle- 
x (So. Dist.) Deeds, Book 3432, page 
5, for breach of the conditions con- 
ined in said mortgage, and for the 
‘rpose of foreclosing the same, will 
sold at public auction, upon the 
emises described in said mortgage, 
Saturday, June 28th, 1919, at two- 
irty o’clock in the afternoon, all 
_d singular the premises described 
said mortgage, viz.: A certain par- 
1 of land with the buildings thereon 
tuated in Newton In the County of 
iddlesex and Commonwealth of 
assachusetts being lot numbered six 
a “Plan of Building Lots Walnut 
1J1, Newton Mass.” dated July 1906 
be recorded with Middlesex Deeds, 
opnded as follows: — Westerly by 
alnut Hill Road one hundred twenty 
nd 20-100 feet; Northerly by Boyl- 
ton Street seventy-five feet; easterly 
y lot numbered Five on said Plan 
ne hundred twenty and 20-100 feet, 
nd Southerly by lot numbered Seven 
n saidt plan seventy-live feet. Con- 
aining eighty-nine hundred and 
ghty-four square feet. Boing the 
ume premises conveyed to said Wil- 
am Dennis Murphy by the said A. 
lexander Achorn et al by deed dated 
rch 18th, 1909, and recorded in said 
eeds and boing hereby conveyed to- 
other with the right of drainage and 
ubject to the right to maintain drain 
entioned therein. Said premises 
ill be sold subject to the taxes as- 
essed as of April 1, 1919, and to 
unicipal liens and assessments, if 
iV. 

*/Dne hundred dollars will be re- 
uired to be paid in cash by the pur- 
jhasor at the time and place of sale; 
I ther terms at sale. 

A. ALEXANDER ACHORN, 
Mortgagee. 

8 Tremont St., Boston, 
n. 917. 
uno 6-13-20. 


Y. M. C. A. 


An investment that never fails. 

Let your money work for you this 
summer while you are at the moun- 
tains or sea shore. 100 investments 
of $1.00 or more at the Newton Y. M. 
C. A. will make it possible to bring 
40 boys from the thickly settled parts 
of Boston each wek during the months 
of July and August and give them a 
full day’s entertainment which in- 
cludes, a car ride, baseball and other 
games on our athletic field, a long 
swim, lunch, music, moving pictures, 
games in the gymnasium, and free use 
of all the games in the Boys' Depart- 
ment. 

We hope that many will want to 
share in so worthy a cause where 
such small amounts will secure so 
direct results. Make all checks pay- 
able to J. W. Blaisdell, Treasurer, and 
mail to the Newton Y. M. C. A. 


SILK 


LEPROOF 


=HOSE= 

W E are pleased to 
announce that the 
arrival yesterday 
of a second very 
large shipment of Silk Hcdf- 
proof Hose puts us again in 
position to fill all orders 
from this extremely popular 
brand. 

This big assortment in- 
cludes Black, White, Field 
Mouse, Gray, Taupe, African 
Brown and Cordovan shades 
in hemmed top and full 
fashioned styles for women, 
and the same colors in 
smooth fitting styles for 
men. 

Quick selling is certain. 
We advise BUY NOW! 
FOR WOMEN 

(3 Pairs in a Box) 

Hemmed Top $3.75 

Full Fashioned $6.75 

FOR MEN 

(3 Pairs in a Box) 

Silk $2.55 

Extra Heavy $3.30 

Assortments Also for Boys and Girls. 
Delivery Paid in New England. 

TALBOT CO. 

395-403 Washington St. 
BOSTON 



Fine Stationery, Engraving and 
Printing, Wedding Announce- 
ments and Club Invita- 
tions, Reception and 
Visiting Curds 

OFFICE SUPPLY HOUSE 
57-61 Franklin St, Boston 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the lieirs-at-law, next of kin, and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Louis N. Lupien late of 
Newton in said County, deceased. 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will and tes- 
tament of said deceased has been pre- 
sented to said Court, for Probate, by 
Clara E. Lupien who prays that letters 
testamentary may bo issued to her, 
the executrix therein named, without 
giving a surety ou her official bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, on 
the twenty-fifth day of June A. D. 
1919, at nine o’clock in the forenoon, 
to show cause, If any you have, why 
the same should not be granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby di- 
rected to give public notice thereof, 
by publishing this citation once in 
each week for th”ee successive weeks, 
in the Newton Graphic a newspaper 
published in Newton the last publi- 
cation to be ono day, at least, before 
said Court, and by mailing postpaid, 
or delivering u copy of this citation to 
all known persons interested in the 
estate, aeveu days at least before said 
Court. 

Witness, Churles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
third day of Juno in the year one 
thousaud nine hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

June 6-13-20 


SCHOOL NOTES 


Stearns School 

The Alistearn Club held its last 
meeting of the season on Juno 6th. 
The club will conduct no activities 
during the summer. Reports were 
read and acceptod from the different 
committees, the treasurer’s report 
showing the club to be in a very sound 
condition. Ice cream was served to 
members and to the cast rehearsing 
for the coming play, “The Hoodoo." 
Mr. Edgar Livingstone presided. 

Swimming became very popular at 
Allison Playground during the hot 
wave. The playground director asks 
swimmers not to enter the water until 
two hours after eating. 

George W. Roloau was added to the 
playground forces to be of any as- 
sistance about the river and bath 
houses. 

Miss Ragna Tronsden and Miss 
Ebba Holteen, both recent graduates 
of Dr. Sargent’s School are teaching 
on the Stearns Playground. 

The Girls’ Club held its last social 
event in the form of a dance in the 
school hall Tuesday evening. June 
third. The hall was attractively deco- 
rated in pink and yellow and the 
music was furnished by the Crescent 
Orchestra. Refreshments were served 
and all enjoyed a pleasant evening. 

The members of the Mothers’ Club 
will hold their annual picnic Thurs- 
dav. June 19th, on the grounds of the 
residence of Mrs. Frank M. Ferrin. 

The Stearns School children wel- 
comed the returned soldiers as the 
parade passed thru Nonantum, Satur- 
day afternoon. They assembled with 
the parochial school children and 
friends at the corner of Pearl and 
Watertown streets. The home of the 
Misses Stearns and the parochial res- 
idence were beautifully decorated with 
'butlng nad flags. Reverend J. E. Ro- 
bichaud presented each child with a 
flag which added much to the gaiety 
of the scene. As the boys passed, pa- 
triotic songs were sung, led by Mr. 
Ward Raymond of the Stearns School. 
The children were very enthusiastic 
and showed their patriotism by greet- 
ing each automobile with rousing 

Thursday morning, May 29, the 
Stearns School had its annual Memor- 
ial Day Exercises. The guests were 
Mr. Flood, a Civil War veteran, and 
Messrs. Edward Terrio, David Keefe, 
and David Fried, members of the 26th 
Division and former pupils of the 
school. The program consisted of a 
play called, “Good Fairy Thrift” and 
brief incidents of the World War by 
the members of the 26th Div. Fol- 
lowing this entertainment, a bullet 
lunch was sorved. 


PLYMOUTH THEATRE — “Very 
Good Eddie”, the melodious Princess 
Theatre farce comedy, which tickled 
the ears and the funnybones of thou- 
sands, will he the attraction at the 
Plymouth Theatre, beginning Monday. 
June 16, marking the second week of 
Carl Hunt’s summer season of favorite 
musical comedies with an all star cast. 
For laughable situations few musical 
pieces ever written can compare with 
this brilliant farce, wherein witty lines 
follow each other as swiftly as the 
bullets from a rapid-fire gun. The 
cast will include the same dainty pret- 
ty ensemble, which has charmed all 
Boston, winning favor not alone by its 
individual and collective winsomeness, 
but also by its rare ability in singing 
and dancing. Miss Dorothy Maynard, 
the delightfully sweet prima donna 
will he assisted by thoroughly com- 
petent players, including Laura Ham- 
ilton, FlAvia Arcaro. Leonore Chippen- 
dale, Rene Brown, Irving Beebe, John 
Norton, and George Gorman. 


COPLEY REPERTORY THEATRE 
— “Are You a Mason?” one of the most 
popular farces of the current theatrical 
era, will be continued for a second 
week at the Copley Theatre. Its story 
recounts the troubles of an elderly 
gentleman and his son-in-law. In order 
to account to their wives for their fre- 
quent absences from home, they claim 
they are Masons, and that they are in 
constant attendance at lodge meetings. 
This offers plenty of opportunity for 
farcical situations and dialogue. And 
when to these is added a comedy ele- 
ment similar to that in ’’Charley’s 
Aunt,” with one of the characters 
masquerading in feminine garb, it is 
apparent that there is ample opportun- 
ity for a farce that is productive of 
continuous uproarious laughter. 



WEDDING GIFTS 
In 

Silver and Cnt Glass 
Lowest Prices Always 
*>41 SUMMER ST. BOSTON* 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To all persons interested in the es- 
tate of Emily DeBacon Page late of 
Newton in said County, deceased: 
WHEREAS, Harry E. Richards the 
executor of the will of said deceased, 
has presented for allowance, the first 
account of his administration upon the 
estate of said deceased: 

You are hereby cited to appear at 
a Probute Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County, on the twenty- 
fourth day of June A.D. 1919, at nine 
o’clock In the forenoon, to show 
cause, if any you have, v r hy tho same 
should not be allowed. 

And said executor is ordered to 
serve this citation by delivering a 
copy thereof to all persons Interested 
in the estate fourteen days at least 
bofore said Court, or by publishing 
tho same onco in each week, for three 
successive weeks, in tho Newton 
Graphic a newspaper published in 
Newton the last publication to be ono 
day at least before said Court, and by 
mailing, post-puid, a copy of this ci- 
tation to all known persons interested 
in the astute seven days ut least be- 
fore said Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-ninth duy of May in tho year 
one thousand nine hundred uud nine- 
teen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

Juno 6-13-20 


I 0 E=a 0 E 30 ] 


loooc sa oBoi 


to C 30 ] 


IN T 

$8000 to $25,000 

Read, for Occupancy in September 


8 TO 11 ROOMS— 1 TO 5 BATHS 
© GARAGE FOR 1 TO 8 CABS 

D BUILT OF BRICK, SIDING, OR 
STUCCO 

© We build to your order on any of our 
Newton estates. We are prepared to 
build very close to pre-war prices. Let 
us show you. 




E WTO NS 



*»*-■ 








Make your selection now — First 
because the locations are limited; 
second because we must start your 
house now for occupancy in Sep- 
tember. 

The lots are priced from $1000 up. 
Located on — 

Commonwealth At. 

Chestnut St 

Howland Rd. 

Grove Hill Av. 

Bullough Park 
In Waban 

West Newton 
Newtonville 


D 




60 STATE STREET 


i o u r s s Q E3 0 1 


[OSLO] 


[ 01=301 


Tel. Main 5305 

lODOl 


Newton Centre 

— Mrs. W. C. Brooks of Laurel street 
is summering at South Woodstock, 
Vt. 

— Miss Mary I. West was one of the 
chain bearers at the Class day exer- 
cises this week at Vassar college. 

— Tho Misses Katherine Vallandig- 
ham and Mary G. Volkmann of Chest- 
nut hill graduated this week from Vas- 
sar college. 

— Mr. Lawrence B. Rice is now 
ranked as champion tennis player at 
Yale, having won last Thursday the 
University singles championship tour- 
nament. He played during the season 
on the University tennis team which 
won every game. With few exceptions 
every match ho played was a love set. 
His partner in doubles was Chuck Gar- 
land, who ranks the tenth best player 
in America. Lawrence will enter the 
singles and doubles national tourna- 
ments this summer in order to try his 
luck. 

— The pianoforte pupils of Mrs. M. 
White O’Donnell entertained relatives 
and friends with an interesting pro- 
gram on Thursday at the teacher’s 
studio. Several of the pupils added to 
the program with solo dances and 
songs after which refreshments and 
games were enjoyed. Those taking 
part were. Alma Neilson, Helen Walsh, 
Mildred Calahan, Eileen Sullivan, John 
Richard,. Margaret Richard. Gertrude 
Merriam. Grace Merriam, C. Lyons, 
Mad-olin Powell, F. King. H. Mitchell, 
Mildred McDonald. H. Boisclair. T. 
Lane. M. Shaughnessy, H. Hourihan, 
E. Anderson. 

— The Members and friends of the 
Methodist Church last Sunday wit- 
nessed a most inspiring and impressive 
Children’s Day program. In addition 
to the usual promotion exercises, in- 
cluding the presentation of diplomas. 
Bibles, Hymn Books and potted plants, 
the school produced a pageant pro- 
gram, arranged by the Board of Educa 
tion. Miss Louise Macleod, represent- 
ing Knowledge, was most effective 
throughout the entire program, and 
took the lead of the various groups rep 
resenting flowers, birds, Boy Scouts, 
Girl Scouts, and the home and school. 
The exchange of messages between 
Knowledge and Democracy was most 
effective. Later the message of Knowl- 
edge and Democracy to the nations of 
the world, represented by young ladies 
taking the part of America and her 
Allies, furnished a fitting climax to a 
service whose inspiration and influence 
will long remain with every person 
privileged to witness it. The Commit 
tee in charge, consisting of Misses 
Gladys Sands, Miriam Huntington. 
Charlotte and Marguerite Flanders, 
are justly entitled to much praise and 
credit for the excellent results accom 
plished. 


NEWTON 25 YEARS AGO 
From tho Newton Graphic of 
June 1, 1S94 


AT ST. CYR 


Word has been received that Capt. 
Wilmot Whitney of Copley street, who 
did not return with the 36th Division 
has been ordered to the Military school 
at St. Cyr. 

Capt. Whitney has been very prom 
inent in sports in the A. E. F. He 
coached and captained the 36th Divi- 
sion eleven that played Capt. Paul 
Withington’s 89th Division team in the 
Anal game for the A. E. F. champion- 
ship. His team got the jump on the 
89th, but was Anally worn down by 
superior weight and power. 

Twice wounded, once through the 
shoulder and again through the arm. 
Capt. Whitney had his experience of 
front line fighting. He went overseas 
with the 176th Division, but 
was transferred to the 36th, in which 
there were many men from Texas and 
Oklahoma. 

He hoped to get homo with tho Sor- 
bonne detachment in the Summer, but 
writes that the St. Cyr job looks good 
for September. 


POLICE NOTES 


As the result of a fatal joy ride in 
West Newton on May 4 Harry A. Orr 
was in the Newton court on Monday 
charged with manslaughter, with driv- 
ing at a speed to endanger the lives 
of tho public and with unlawful ap- 
propriation of an automobile. On tho 
first charge Judge Bacon found prob- 
able cause and ordered Orr held in 
bonds of $2500 to await the action of 
the grand Jury. For speeding ho was 
given a year in the House of Correc- 
tion and for unlawfully appropriating 
tlie machine was fined $20. From tho 
last two sentences he uppealod. 

Richard Dalton, who was one of 
muny witnesses heard, suld that he 
and Donahue brought liquor to the 
garage and that Orr had two drinks. 
He theu locked the place after tuking 
out the car. The witness thought that 
the machine was not travelling more 
than twenty-flvo miles uu hour wheu 
tho collision occurred. 


Funeral services held for George S. 
Harwood, who died April 28 at Rome. 
Italy. 

Death of Mr. Aaron F. Emery at 
South Norwalk. Ct. 

Mr. Arthur W. Porter wins mile bi- 
cycle race and two-thirds mile race at 
Waltham, Memorial Day. 

Memorial Day exercises held by 
Charles Ward Post. G. A. R., with 104 
men in line under Commander W. D. 
Tripp. Newton High School Battal- 
ion parades 150 men under commands 
of Capt. E. R. Springer and Capt. F. Q. 
Blanchard and the Claflin Guard, 
under command 1 of Capt. J. Albert 
Scott. Procession formed at Newton- 
ville and marched to the Newton Cem- 
etery. thence thru Newton Highlands, 
and Upper Falls where evening parade 
was held. 

Annual reunion of Alumni associa- 
tion of the Allen School held at Hotel 
Vendome, Boston. 

Newton canoeists win races at East- 
ern Division meet held at Springfield. 

Wedding of Mr. Frederic W. Turner 
and Miss Eva E. Brackett. 

Foundations are being laid for the 
new Central Church at Newtonville. 

Contracts awarded to Jeremiah Cot- 
ter & Son for section 5, of Common- 
wealth avenue boulevard, to Thomas 
F. Mague for section 6. to Frank H. 
Stuart for section 1, Wm. H. Mague 
for section 2, and sections 3 and 4 to 
be done by the city. 

Wedding of Mr. Edward W. Spurr 
of Auburndale and Miss Grace C. 
O’Neil of New York. 

Wedding of Miss Cornelia E. Parker 
and Mr. Stephen A. Bailey. 

Wedding of Miss Carrie L. Bourne 
and Dr. John D. Brewster. 

June .8 

Wedding of Miss Emma C. Tudor 
and Mr. Frederick S. Converse. 

I^asell holds annual commencement. 

Aldermen hold interesting hearing on 
sixth class liquor license for Bernard 
Billings of Upper Falls. 

Lee, of Auburndale. wins tennis 
tournament of Waban Racquet Club. 

Wedding of Mrs. Arthur W. Yose 
and Miss M. Josephine Woodworth. 

Wedding of Mr. James B. Newell 
and Miss Susie H. Bigelow. 

Mr. Charles W. Shepard of West 
Newton appointed U. S. Consul at Cal- 
ais by President Cleveland. 

New postoffice opened in Associates’ 
block, Newton Centre. 

Death of Mrs. Alexander Tyler of 
Newton Highlands. 

Strike still continues at Newton Silk 
Mills, Upper Falls. 
lowegion.Mdug aMeforT fl.yeliakecorit 


AUCTION 

SALES 


We held fifteen Auction Sales 
last Year — every one being suc- 
cessful — a record no other Auc- 
tioneer in this community can 
claim. 

Let Us Sell Your Real Estate 
at Auction. 

J. EDWARD CALLANAN 

Real Estate Broker and 
Auctioneer 

271 WASHINGTON STREET 
NEWTON 


. .OtOciropfis 
Copied 


H 


and made more 
beautiful by the 
artistic skill of 

Sadtracft 

687 Boylston St, Boston 



J 


AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE 

AT COST 
• 'HhyPt>. V More • 

Mossaclxisetis Mutual Auto. Ins. Ca 
Automobile Mutual Liability Ins. Ca 
40 Central Street, Boston 


Boston Elevated Railway Go. 

SURFACE LINES 
Subject to Change Without Notice 

WATERTOWN STATION TO CENTRAL 
S(). (Cambridge Subway) — Via Arsenal 
St.. 5. OS 5. 22. 5.37, 5.53, 6.00, 7. 8. and 
5 min. to 8.57 A. M., and every 15 min. to 
4.07, 7 and 8 min. to 4.30, every 5 inln. 
to 6.22. every 15 min. to 11.52 P. M., 12.0S 
A. M. SUNDAY 6.25, 20 min. to 8.05 A. 
M.. and each 15 minutes to 11.52,, 12.08 
A. M. 

WATERTOWN STATION TO NORTH 
CAMIIK1DGK (Via Harvard Sq.) — 5.04. 
5.30. 5.46, 6.55, 6.05. 6.15, 6.22. 6.30, 6.39 
6.47, 6.55. 7.03. 7.11, 7.17 A. M.. and each 
5 and 6 min. to 11.39, 11.46. 11.53. 11.59 
P. M.. 12.05. 12.14, 12.24. 12.30, 12.51, 12.57. 
1.22 A. M. SUNDAY 5.30. 6.06. each 15 
minutes to 7.06, 7.17. 7.33. 7.47. 8. 01. 8.16. 
8.25. and each 7 and 8 min. to 11.54 A. M., 
every 6 min, to 11.00 P. M., 7 and S min. 
to 11.30. 11.39. 11.47. 11.53. 12.05. 12.14. 
12.24. 13.30, 12.51. 12.57. 1.23 night. 

MO I IT AND EARLY MORNING SERVICE. 
Newton to Adams Sq. and Dudley St.. 

Mt. Auburn (by transfer at Harvard Sq.) 
12.12. 1.41. 2.41. 3.41, 4.41 A. M. Return 
take Harvard Sq. car leaving Adams Sq. 
12.35, 1.05. 1.35. 2.35, 3.35. 4.36 A. M. 

Take Harvard Sq. car at Dudley St.. 1.39, 
3.39. 3.39. 4.39. 

CAMHR1DGE SUBWAY TRAINS. From 
Harvard Sq., 6.24 A. M., to 11.51 night. 
From Broadway. 5.34 A. M., to 11.54 night. 
SUNDAY. 6.04 A. M.. to 11.64 night. 

May 17, 1919. 

EDWARD DANA. 

Supt. of Trun»|>ort»tlou. 


Notice Is Hereby Given, that the 
subscriber has been duly appointed ad- 
ministrator of the estate of Patrick J. 
Doyle late of Newton In the County of 
Middlesex, deceased. Intestate, and has 
taken upon himself that trust by giv- 
ing bond, as the law directs. AH per- 
sons having demands upon the estate 
of suid deceased are required to exhibit 
the same; aud all persous indebted to 
said estate are called upon to make 
payment to 

EL WOOD A. HOWE. Adm. 
(Address) 

106 Harvard St., Newton, Mass. 

May 21st, 1919. 

May 30-June 6-13. 


HINCKLEY & WOODS^ 

I N S U R A N C „ 
98 MILK 

ITV, AUTO* 

BOSTOfL^ MOBILE, BUR- 
GLARY AND EVERY 
DESCRIPTION OF INSUR- 
ANCE AT LOWEST RATES. 
’Teh. 1 465. 1 44 1. 14(7, 1 4tl. 1489.4113 141 39 ■■§ 


COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 
REAL ESTATE 


Pursuant to a warrant to me direct- 1 
ed from the Probate Court of the J 
County of Middlesex and Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, appointing 
me Commissioner to make partition of 
the land hereinafter described, dated 
May 23rd, 1919, I, having been first 
sworn, dd hereby give public notice 
that pursuant to and by virtue of said 
warrant I shall sell at public auction 
on Saturday, June 14. at 3 P. M., on 
the premises hereinafter described, 
the Real Estate situated in Newton in 
said County of Middlesex and bounded 
and described as follows, to wit: 

(1) A certain parcel of land, with 
the buildings thereon, situated in that 
part of said Newton called West New- 
ton. bounded and described as fol- 
lows: beginning at the Northwesterly 
corner thereof, on Crescent Street 
near Webster Street at land now or 
late of Wright, and running Easterly 
by said Wright land, one hundred fifty 
15-100 (150.15) feet, to land formerly 
of David C. Sanger and now of the Ben- 
jamin S. Hatch Company; thence run- 
ning Southerly by said land of the 
Benjamin S. Hatch Company, sixty 
(60) feet to the parcel herein second 
described; thence running Westerly 
by said second described parcel, one 
hundred fifty (150) feet to said Cres- 
cent Street; thence running Northerly 
by said Crescent Street, sixtv-seven 
(67) feet to the point of beginning: 
containing nine thousand five hundred 
twenty-five (9.525) square feet of land, 
more or less: being the same prem- 
ises described in a deed of Moody 
Merrill. Trustee, to Charles T. Allen, 
dated June 1. 1SS5, recorded with Mid- 
dlesex So. Dist. Deeds, Book 1711. 
Page 66: 

(2) Another certain parcel of land 
on said Crescent Street, bounded and 
described as follows: beginning at the 
Northwesterly corner thereof, on said 
Crescent Street, at the parcel herein- 
before first described, and running 
Easterly by said first described parcel, 
one hundred fifty (150) feet, to said 
land of the Benjamin S. Hatch Com- 
pany; thence running Southerly by 
said land of the Benjamin S. Hatch 
Company, sixty-seven (67) feet, to 
land now or late of Cruice; then run- 
ning Westerly vby said Cruice land, 
one hundred fifty (150) feet, to said 
Crescent Street; thence running 
Northerly by said Crescent Street to 
the point of beginning; containing ten 
thousand fifty (10,050) square feet of 
land, more or less: being the same 
premises described in the deed of 
Francis Murdoch, dated April 1, 1890, 
recorded with Middlesex So. Dist. 
Deeds. Book 1969. Page 3S4. 

EDMUND W. OGDEN, 

Commissioner. 
West Newtou. Mass. 

May 30-June 6-13 


INSURANCE 

AUTOMOBILE 

FIRE 

ACCIDENT 

HEALTH and 
LIFE 

HERBERT GALLAGHER 

99 Park St., Newton, Mass. 

TeL Newton North 14 

^ NEWTON REAL ESTATE k. 

ALVORD BROS. 

(Established 25 years) 

Main Office. 79 Milk St.. Boston, Mass. 
Local Office, opp. Newton Centre Depot 

We solicit the listing of all Newton 
land and houses for sale or to let 

INSURANCE AUCTIONEERS 
EXPERT APPRAISERS 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, s«^ 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Abbv Temple Poole late 
of Newton in said County, deceased. 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will and tes- 
tament of said deceased ha3 been pre- 
sented to said Court, for Probate, by 
Norman Farquhar who prays that let- 
ters testamentary may be issued to 
him. the executor therein named, 
without giving a surety on his official 
bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, ou 
the thirtieth day of June A. D. 1919, 
at nine o’clock in the forenoon, to 
show cause, if any you have, why the 
same should not be granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby di- 
rected to give public notice thereof, 
by publishing this citation once in 
each week, for three successive 
weeks, in the Newton Graphic a news- 
paper published in Newton the last 
publication to be one day, at least, 
before said Court, and by mailing 
postpaid, or delivering a copy of this 
citation to all known persons inter- 
ested in the estate, seven days at least 
before said Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
third day of June in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

June 6-13-20. 


Commonwealth of Massachuetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


Notice Is hereby given that the sub- 
scriber has been duly appointed ex- 
ecutrix of the will of Alexander M. 
Ferris late of Newton in the County 
of Middlesex, deceased, testate, and 
has taken upon herself that trust by 
giving bond, as the law directs. All 
persous having demands upon the es- 
tate of said deceased are hereby re- 
quired to exhibit the same; aud ull 
persons indebted to said estate are 
called upon to make payment to 

EMMA J. FERRIS, Executrix. 
(Address) 

87 Washington St., 

Newtou, Mass. 

May 28, 1919. 

May 30- June 6-13. 


To the heirs-at-law. next of kin, cred- 
itors, and all other persons inter- 
ested in the estate of Edgar Francis 
Eames late of Newton in said Coun- 
ty. deceased, intestate. 

WHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration on the estate of said 
deceased to Elbridge John Eames of 
Newton in the County of Middlesex, 
without giviug a surety on his bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge. in said Couuty of Middlesex, 
ou the twenty-third day of June A D. 
1919. at nine o’clock in the forenoon, 
to show cause if any you have, why 
the same should not be granted. 

And the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the last publication 
to be ono day, at least, before said 
Court. 

Witness, (’ harks J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
second day ^>f Juno in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

June 6-13-20. 


It Pavs to Advertise 


V 




THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE IB, 1019. 


DOMESTIC SCIENCE 


P. P. ADAMS’ BIG DEPARTMENT STORE, WALTHAM 


That Men and Women Want 
For Slimmer Wear 

Whether for dress, business or pleasure you’ll find 
just the grade, quality and style here, and with it goes 
the positive assurance of perfect satisfaction to you, be- 
cause we handle makes that are built on the quality basis. 

Come and see for yours'elf. 


STRAP SANDALS OR LOW SHOES $3.00 

The dressiest summer styles for Miss or Child. See 
these pretty Patent Leathers at $3.00 

CANVAS SANDALS FOR MISSES 

White canvas strap styles for Misses and Children. 
Unusual quality for $2.00 

WOMEN’S LOW SHOES 

Black leather in a soft smooth finish. An ideal sum- 
mer shoe for comfort $6.00 

WOMEN’S SHOES AT $7.00 

The stylish dark browns in a new last $7.00 

WHITE SHOES FOR WOMEN 

The cool white Canvas and the good looking durable 
dressy Nu-buck. 

$3.50 for the Canvas $6.00 for the Nu-Buck 

SPORT SHOES FOR BOYS 

Strong, durable leathers for outing wear $2.50 

BOYS’ BROWN CANVAS SNEAKERS 98c 


Here’s a W onderf ill Shoe F or 
Men at $6.50 

It’s of the stylish dark brown leather in either Blucher 
last or plain with English Toe. Both low cuts and in the 
grade unusual at this price. Any size in either last $6.50 


LEGAL STAMPS 


FREE DELIVERY 


P. P. ADAMS’ 

Big Department Store 

133-139 Moody Street Waltham 



e*? HARDWOOD FLOORS 


Parquetry flooring ami wood carpets mod- 
ernize floors. Estimates given. 

VVOLFSON FLOORING CO. 

Expert Designers. Manufacturers, 
Contractors 

42-44 MAIN STREET 

Tel. Everett 1710 Everett 



'NONE BETTER AT ANY PRICE 

r SOLD BY GROCERS EVERYWHERE 

' BOSTON DWINELL 'WRIGHT CO. CHICAGO 



TIRE AND 
SUPPLY CO. 


Miss Marian Keep, Editor 
Sterlllxe Milk Utensils. 


The approach of warm weather adds 
to both the dairyman’s and the house- 
keeper’s problem of keeping milk 
from souring. It is commonly known 
that bacteria in milk produce changes 
which spoil it and therefore every 
means should be taken to reduce the 
bacteria content of milk as much as 
possible. This can be done, first, by 
producing milk under clean condi- 
tions, second, by handling and by 
keeping it in sterilized utensils, and 
third, by keeping It cold. 

Soiled milk utensils, and even those 
which apparently are clean, but which 
have not been sterilized, contain vast 
numbers of bacteria which arc added 
to milk or cream when It comes in 
contact with them. 

Don't Forget Washing. 

Before sterilizing rinse all utensils 
in cold water, then wash thoroughly 
with hot water and washing powder. 
Sterilization is not n substitute for 
washing. Keep the milk in a separate 
compartment in the ice chest. Re- 
member the food value in milk is very 
high, it contains sugar and fat, which 
provide energy for the body, protein 
which is important in making and re- 
building the tissue and mineral salts 
which keep the body in good condi- 
tion. - We can not afford to waste a 
single quart. 

Recipe. 

Goldenrod Eggs. 

3-4 large slices buttered toast cut di- 
agonally. 

2 c. medium white sauce. 

2 hard cooked eggs. 

Arrange the toast on a platter. Keep 
it hot. Remove the shells from the 
eggs, chop the whites fine and put 
the yolks into a strainer. Make me- 
dium white sauce, add the chopped 
whites to the sauce and pour it over 
the toast. Then press the yolk thru 
the strainer, over the white sauce and 
toast. 


TOMATO PLANTS anil 
CABBAGE PLANT8 
Both Early and Late Varieties at 
NEWTON ROSE CONSERVATORIES 
it. c. Brldgham, Prop 
829 NewtonTlIIo Avenue 
Newtonvflle 

Telephone Newton North 404 


Newton 


— Mr. Henry Turner is seriously ill 
at his homo on Jewett street. 

— Hon. and' Mrs. G. Fred Simpson 
have gone to their summer home at 
Annisquam. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Jnmes W. French 
have opened their summer home at Ed- 
gartown, Mass. 

— West Newton Co-operative Bank. 
Start an account this month. 1 to 40 
shares at $1.00 eaeliw Advt. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George B. Ryan of 
Wesley street are receiving congratula- 
tions on the birth of a son. 

— Miss Edith Jamieson of Eldredge 
street is visiting Mrs. Hollis Baker 
(Ruth MacLure) at Allegan. Michigan. 

— There was a still alarm Monday 
night for a slight fire at 159-Tremont 
street, caused by an electric flatiron. 

— Rev. Harry Lutz, pastor of Chan 
ning Church has recently been elected 
President of the Boston Browning So- 
ciety. 

— Bbx 176 was rung Saturday after- 
noon for a slight fire on the steps of 
the Nonantum Boys’ Club on Dalby 
street. 

-Robert Lutz starts today for Lake 
Megunticook, where he is to be coun- 
sellor in Mr. Cowing’s camp this 
summer. , 

— Miss Eunice Harriman will enter- 
tain the seniors of the High School 
next Saturday evening at her home on 
Centre street. 

— Mayor Childs has vetoed the grant 
for a gas filling station in Nonantum 
square, which had Just been passed by 
the aldermen. 

—Among the graduates this week 
from the Wheelock School, of Boston 
were Miss Ruth Hains and Miss Phyl- 
lis E. Taylor of this village. 

NEWTON BRANCH SPECIAL AID 


Newton 


Friday Dinner. 

Baked fish — sauce a la Creole 
Mashed Potato 
Fresh String Beans 

Cucumber and Tomato Salad 
Lemon Meringue 

Baked Fish. 

Two or three pounds of fish — two 
tablespoons drippings, 2 tbsp. cut on- 
ion. 1 cup tomato, 2 tablespoons chop- 
ped green peppers, 1-2 tsp. salt, spk. 
paprika and allspice. 

After the fish has been scaled and 
the head removed and tail removed, 
split and remove the back bone and 
small bone at top and bottom. Wash, 
dry and put in shallow pan that has 
been greased with drippings, skin 
side down. Cover with sauce and bake 
25 to 30 min. Place on a hot platter 
with a border of mashed potato. 

Sauce. — Put the drippings in pan, 
add onions and peppers, fry until ten- 
der, but not brown. Add tomatoes, 
spice and seasoning, boil 10 min., then 
add 1 tbsp. flour thickening and 1 cup 
of water, boil five minutes and mash 
through strainer. 


COPLEY SQUARE 

CUARANTY vs. NO GUARANTY 

The following extract i« quoted, word for word, from the guar- 
anty of several of the popular advertised tires: “. . . Pneumatic auto- 
mobile tires are NOT guaranteed to give any definite miles of serv- 
ice.” In contrast to the foregoing, tires sold by us ARE guaranteed 
to give definite mileage service, except in case of misuse or abuse. 

THINK IT OVER! 

PORTAGE TIRES 

“NONE BETTER MADE" 

FABRIC CASINGS ARE GUARANTEED 6000 MILES 

CORD CASINGS ARE GUARANTEED 9000 fyllLES 
Our sales of these sturdy, long-life tires are constantly increasing 
in volume, and the cost is LESS than that of the so-called standard 
tires which are guaranteed 3500 miles. 

CALL, WRITE OR PHONE FOR QUOTATIONS 

COPLEY SQUARE TIRE AND SUPPLY CO. 

SUCCESSORS TO CUT PRICE AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

587 Boylslon St., Boston 

Telephone B. B. 541, 1500 
OPEN TUESDAY AND SATURDAY EVENINGS 


Aub urn dale 

— West* Newton Co-operative Bank. 
Start an account this month. 1 to 40 
shares at $1.00 each. Advt. 

— The W. C. T. U. will hold its an- 
nual meeting at the home of Mrs. 
Harry S. Lee, 52 Washburn avenue. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Price of 
Chaske avenue have gone to England 
to visit relatives there. They sailed 
by way of Canada. 

— The many friends of Mr. E. Bur- 
nard Squire will be sorry to know that 
he has been obliged to return to the 
Hospital on account of serious* illness. 

— Mrs. Stephen Butler of Northamp- 
ton. with her daughter, Joyce, was in 
town this week on a flying visit to 
Lasell. She was formerly Miss Myrtis 
Barton of this village. 

— Money deposited In Auburndale 
Co-operative Bank goes on interest 
monthly. Interest Is compounded 
four times a year,. Last dividends at 
rate of 6% per cent. advt. 

— The Choir Boys of the Church of 
the Messiah were entertained by Mrs. 
Newstead of Bowers ■street, Newton- 
ville, on Thursday evening, and a 
Whist Party was given. 

— The Christian FIndeavor Society of 
the Congregational Church had a very 
successful sale and lawn party Wed- 
nesday afternoon. The posters which 
announced the sale were especially ar- 
tistic. 

— The Lawn Party on the grounds of 
the Church of the Messiah Saturday 
afternoon promises to be an interesting 
occasion. Food and candy will be for 
sale, and it is understood there will be 
music by a fife and drum corps, also 
outdoor 3ports and games. 

PLAYERS ELECT OFFICERS 


Wendell House, for men In Uni- 
form, at 31 Mount Vernon Street, Bos- 
ton, has been very successful and Is 
going to continue for another year. 
Since it was opened in December, 
1918, 11,000 boys have been accommo- 
dated', so that there is no doubt that 
it supplies a real need. After Sep- 
tember first, the official headquarters 
of the Special Aid Society will be at 
Wendell House. 

The Officers’ House, 39 Bay State 
Road, which has also been a success 
and constantly filled, closed on June 
12, much to the regret of the Society. 
The owner, Mrs. Charles Fiske, to 
whose generosity the Society is in- 
debted for the use of it, requires it 
now for her own use, and there is no 
other house available for the purpose. 

There are constant calls for gar-, 
ments and the Newton workroom 
would' welcome most heartily any who 
can give time on Mondays and Thurs- 
days, either morning or afternoon. 

CENTRAL SQUARE THEATRE 

Dorothy Gish in her new Paramount 
picture “I’ll Get Him Yet,” will be 
shown at Gordon’s Cambridge Central 
Square Theatre next Monday, Tues- 
day and Wednesday. There will also 
be five all-star acts of vaudeville, 
headed by Susan Tompkins, one of 
the foremost American violinists: 
O’Donnell and Blair, comedy acrobats: 
Edna Bennett, vaudeville’s leading 
lady: Fern & Davis, in a comedy 
sketch entitled “Nightmare Reviews”: 
and Fred and Anita Brad, comedy con- 
tortionists. Fatty Arbuckle will ap- 
pear in his latest production, “A Des- 
ert Hero.” 


DANIEL CLIFFORD STONE 


The annual meeting of The Players 
was held Monday night at Players’ 
Hall, West Newton, following a din- 
ner, served to 33 of the members on 
the stage of the hall. At the close of 
the meal reports were read by the 
various officers which showed that the 
society was in an excellent condition 
financially and otherwise. The Play- 
ers organized in 1887 and several of 
the original members were present at 
the meeting. 

These officers were chosen for the 
coming season: Waldo (Hidden of 
l^xington. president; Thomas E 
Stutson. Brookline, vice-president; 
Harry L. Burrage, West Newton, sec- 
retary; Miss Alice L. Frost, Newton, 
assistant secretary, and Charles I* 
Hatfield, West Newton, treasurer. 



WEDDING GIFTS 
In 

Cut Glass ami Rock Crystal 
Best Values la Boston 
Ml SUMMER ST BOSTON - 


Daniel Clifford Stone, who died on 
Monday at his home in Newton Centre, 
following an illness of several months 
from heart disease, was born in Kit- 
tery. Me., on Oct. 27, 1871. The next 
year lie came with his parents to Bos- 
ton, and here he attended the public 
schools until the family removed 
eleven years later to Brockton, 
where he was graduated from the 
high school in 1889. For the next four 
years he was engaged on experimental 
electrical and' photometrical work in 
developing incandescent electric light- 
ing, at that time an industrial infant, 
ami he then spent several months at 
8ea on similar experimental work in 
the service of the International Mer- 
cantile Marine Company. 

In 1894 Mr. Stone became a commer- 
cial traveller in the tea, coffee and 
spice trade, and he continued success- 
fully in that business nearly a quarter 
of a century. 

For many years Mr. Stone had been 
enthusiastically interested in his fam- 
ily history, and he has made extensive 
genealogical investigations. In 1910 
he published a small genealogy of his 
own line of the family. Since 1908 
Mr. Stone has been a member of the 
Stone Family Association and active 
in its work, and he was elected its 
president in 1918. 

In the historical field Mr. Stone held 
memberships in the Massachusetts So- 
ciety of tin- Sons of the American 
Revolution, the Massachusetts Society 
of Mayflower Descendants, and the 
New England Historic-Genealogical 
Society. Ho was long identified with 
the Masonic fraternity as a member 
of Washington lodge of Roxhury, Mys- 
tic Royal Arch chapter of Medford, 
and Medford council of Royal and Se- 
lect Masters. He was a member of 
Codman lodge, Ancient Order of Unit- 
ed Workmen of Massachusetts, and 
for many years a member of Boston 
council of the United Commercial 
Travellers of America. From 1889 to 
1894 he was a member of Buttery I, 
First Heavy Artillery, Massachusetts 
Volunteer Militia. Since his first mar- 
riage, his home had been successive- 
ly in Brockton, Winthrop, Dorchester, 
Medford and Newton Centre. 

He married, first, ut Brockton, April 
19, 1894, Nellie Renu Richardson, of 
Neponset, daughter of George Amos 
and Alice (Hudson) Richardson, She 
died in Winthrop on March 31, 1903. 
Ho married, secondly, at Somerville, 
April 12, 1905, Annie Creighton Eaton, 
daughter of John Russell and Mar- 
garet (Ray) Eaton. She survives her 
husband. 


Telephone MncLean, 726 or 2654-M] 
North, for anything in the carpenter 
line. advt. 

— Miss Emily Woods was one of the 
graduates this week at Bradford Aca- 
demy. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Albert H. Waitt of 
Vernon street have taken a cottage at 
Onset. 

— The Rev. Newton A. Merritt. Jr. 
has bought the Ivy house on Fairmont 
avenue. 

— Mr. Daniel M. Bonney of Centre 
street is at his summer home at Farm- 
ington, Me. 

— Miss Mildred Lucas of Hunnewell 
terrace entertained several friends on 
Monday evening. 

— Miss Mary Stebbins and Miss 
Helen Radcliffe graduated this week 
from Vnssar college. 

— Mrs. Laurens MacLure has re- 
turned from the west, where she has 
been visiting her daughter. 

— At Grace church last Sunday eve- 
ning the orison rendered by a trumpet 
and organ was most effective. 

— Alderman B. L. Goodwin of Fair- 
view street was re-elected treasurer at 
the annual meeting this week of the 
Boston Rotary Club. 

' — Dr. John C. Ferguson has recently 
returned from China. Dr. and Mrs. 
Ferguson expect to remain until Fall 
when they will return to China. 

— Invitations are being' issued to 
the boys who have returned to attend 
a banquet given by the Welcome Home 
Fund' Committee Saturday, June 21. 

— All lovers of flowers should see 
Mr. Henry H. Kendal’s garden on Ken- 
dal terrace, just now at its height. 
There are 225 varieties of peonies in 
bloom. * 

— Sergt. John E. Higgins, brother of 
Miss Higgins of the Underwood 
school, a member of the 317th Field 
Signal Battalion.^ has just returned 
from overseas. 

— Lieut. Channing E. Harwood, who 
returned last Friday after a year’s ab- 
sence in France, was given an informal 
reception Sunday evening at his home 
on Willard street. 

— Mrs. Hale, Matron of the Home or 
Aged People, expects to go for a two 
weeks’ vacation at Peaks’ Island, Me. 
Her sister, Mrs. Skinner, of Canada, 
will take her place during her ab- 
sence. 

— The wedding of Miss Frances A. 
Lewis of Playstead road and Mr. Wil- 
liam M. Hilloard of Quincy, took place 
last week Monday. Rev. N. A. Merritt, 
Jr., of Immanuel Church performing 
the ceremony. 

— Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Corey of Far- 
low road have closed their house for 
an indefinite period and have gone to 
Alaska. Upon their return in the fall, 
they will go to their home in Fitz- 
william, N. H. 

— On Tuesday afternoon the annual 
lawn party of Channing Sunday School 
was held on the grounds of the church. 
Mr. Charles L. Pearson, Jr., was in 
charge of the festivities assisted by 
Mrs. Ralph Angler’s Class. 

— Mr. Charles Hopkins and Miss 
Grace Langdale both of this village 
were united in marriage at the bride’s 
home on Chestnut street, the Rev. Mr. 
Milton Perry officiating. After the 
ceremony the couple left for New 
Hampshire, where they will enjoy an 
extended honeymoon. 

— In his address ;n Grace Church 
Sunday evening, (he Rev. Edward T. 
Sullivan of Newton Centre called at- 
tention to the symbolism of the last 
two syllables of American. They stood 
he said for “I can.” American soldiers 
everywhere have done that which they 
set out to do. 

— After nearly forty-three years of 
active practice, the* first few years of 
which were spent in the hospitals of 
London and Vienna, and thirty-eight 
in Newton, Dr. Robert A. Reid has de- 
cided to retire and will close his' office 
in Bank Building, the latter part of 
this month. He will devote his atten- 
tion to his other interesfs, and more 
or less to travel. 

— Mor^iy night the Woman’s Mis- 
sionary Societies of the Methodist 
Church entertained the young people 
of the Queen Esther. Standard Bearers. 
Home Guard, and King’s Heralds So- 
cieties. Mrs. C. R. Warring spoke on 
The Call for Leaders.” The hostesses 
were Mrs. Raymond Kilgore, Mrs. 
Maurice Viles, Mrs. Chauncey Strum. 
A social hour and refreshments fol- 
lowed the regular program. 

The wedding of Miss Edith H. 
Moore, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Stephen Moore of Oakleigh road and 
Dr. Leslie H. Naylor of Hunnewell ave- 
nue took place Tuesday afternoon at 
the home of the bride. Rev. Newton 
A. Merritt. Jr., pastor of Immanuel 
Baptist church, performed the cere- 
mony anti little Miss Muriel Naylor, 
daughter of the groom was the ring 
bearer. Dr. and Mrs. Naylor will re 
side at 109 Hunnewell avenue. 

On Thursday afternoon the Garden 
Club gave “Titania, A Butterfly’s Car- 
nival” on the grounds of Mrs. Frank 
M. Ferrin’s residence at 35 Hunnewell 
avenue. Those who took part were 
Alice Bnrney. Barbara Partridge, Vir- 
ginia Partridge, Eleanor Haynes, 
Charles, John, and Mary Marshall, 
Marguerite, Dorothy, and Preston Bar- 
ba. Adelaide Simpson! Nancy Baldwin 
and Louise Baldwin. The play was 
given for the benefit of the Floating 
Hospital, and was coached by Mrs. 
Loring L. Marshall. 

WILL BE MOLD AT 

PUBLIC AUCTION 

SATURDAY, JUNE 14,*1919 

TWO PARCELS' REAL ESTATE 

Parcel 1 Contains 

Single Dwelling House 

STABLE 

Together with 9525 sq. ft. of lund, 
more or less 
EXCELLENT GARDEN 
Situated At 

14 Crescent St., West Newton, Mass. 

TERRS: $200 ut time of sale. I till- 
u nee in 10 days on delivery of deed. 
Pareel 2, adjoining Parcel I, 
consisting of 

10,050 Sq.Ft. of Land, more or less 

EILMS: $100 at time of sale, bal- 
ance In 10 days on delivery of deed. 
WM. H. RAND, Auctioneer 
1295 Washington SL, West Newtou 


HENRY MURRAY 

— —.COMPANY-— — 

Established 1870 

DESIGNERS AND MAKERS OF 

Monuments and Memorial Tablets 

GRANITE— MARBLE— SLATE 

O UR many years of experience in Memorial Art we believe to be 
of value to all interested in selecting work of this character. 

T^HE aim of our firm has always been to gain the confidence of its 
* patrons by a thorough understanding of each individual case,* 
and to retain it by the high quality of its work. 

(We furnish duplicates of markers and cut lettering upon 
monuments already in place.) 

21 ARLINGTON STREET, BOSTON Phone Back Bay 82 
Works at Brighton 


T©1. Newton North 2172-M 

Sam Bloom, Custom Tailor 

Suits Made To Order, Cleansing, Pressing and Repairing at Moderate Pri<| 

PurlRomodellns a Specialty 

Work Colled For and Delivered Contract PreHtif 

307 Centre Street, opp. Post Office Newtd 


LODGES 


Cryptic Council, R. & S. M.. worked 
the Super-Excellent degree Tuesday 
evening with members of Hyde Park 
Council as their guests. 

Tomorrow evening Newton Lodge of 
Elks will observe Flag Day with ap- 
propriate exercises. Major Howard 
Moore who has just returned from 
France will give an illustrated lecture. 

The annual meeting of Dalhousie 
Lodge of Masons was held Wednesday 
evening and the new officers will be 
publicly installed this evening. 


FENCES 


flflififlhiiiiiflfiliiifl;, iiiifliii 

iiiiiii iiiiiiiiiuiiijiiimii 



REAL ESTATE /.*, 

# 



Insurance 

Of All 
Kinds 



Lexington St. 
Auburndsle 


Our boys are coming Home frorl 
Prance. We want work for them. No| 
Is the time to build your fence. 

Wire and Iron 

SECURITY FENCE ERECTING CO. ] 
284 Somerville Avenue, Somerville, ] 
Phone Somerville 3900 or write Deptl 
B for Estimate. 


PAXTON’S 

CONFECTIONER CATERER 

Weddings and receptions, 
catered to in superior style. 
Simple, and most elaborate 
menus sent upon request. 

Call Newton North 68 


BARBOUR & TRAVIS! 

Insurance Description 

Real Estate ^8 0 eii£r t,ni « 

T. WALLACE TSAYlft 
Notary Public 
Justice of the Peace 

Natl Bank Building, IT. Newton j| 

Tel. 689- W 


BOSTON BRASS ANDIRON 9 

83 HAVERHILL STREET 
Near North Station Entrance (up one fllgfai 
Telephone Richmond 2374 
We carry a large stock of Andirons, 

Sets. Fenders and Screens from whig 
you may select patterns to suit . 
any period of architecture. 





PIANO 


TOrtINC 


G. P. ATKINS 

396 Centre Street, Newton 


Specialist on all piano troubl— 

Boston office, 10 Brcmlield St. Telephons In Resldsnil 
Over 20 years experience. Refers to his many patrons, 
whom are Ex-Gov. Brackett, Hon. Samuel W. McCall) J 
Harold Crosby iiu.ton rosn Dramatic Editor and 
Cyrue Dillen the famous Sculptor, Philip Stockton, Pres, 
Colony Trust Co. J. J. Marlin, Pres. Exchange TruelJL 
Newton roferencos. Freedom Hutchinson, Rev. Geo. S. But ter a 
Sup|. Garrity Met. Life Ini. Co., Messrs. Webster, Cuqtil 
Kenway, Roger W. Babsun, (Wellesley) and many other wt 
known Newton people. Newton office, C. E. Josselyn's pertol 
kal Store, 340 Centre Street. 

4o /LOCI 

Tel. Bellevue 876-W. Mail to Boston. P.O.Box 


NEWTON TAILORING CO. 413 Centre St. Newton 

Ladies' and Men’s Fine Tailoring 

Suite made to order In latest styles. Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and Repair! 

LADIES' GARMENTS and FURS ALTERED A SPECIALTY 
Work called for and delivered. Special arrangements for monthly prs 

Open Evenings till 8.80 Tel. 706-W Newton North 


FORD MARKET CO. 

297 CENTRE STREET, NEWTON 
Telephones Newton North 61 — 62 — 63 A. J. Ford, Prop. 

United States Food Administration No. G 107544 

SIRLOIN STEAK AND ROAST per tb 55c 

1st CUT OF RIB AND SIRLOIN TIP per tb 50c 

TOP OF ROUND STEAK per !b 50c 

LOWER ROUND OF BEEF per tb 40c 

SPRING LAMB HINDS per tb 40c 

FANCY FRESH KILLED FOWL per tb 48c 

FANCY ROASTING CHICKENS per lb 55c 

FANCY BROILERS per lb 60c 

LOIN AND LEG OF VEAL per lb 35c to 38c 

Live Lobsters per tb 42c Fresh Mackerel per lb 15c 

Eastern Halibut per tb 40c Flounders per lb 15c 

Eastern Salmon per lb 60c Butterfish per tb 20c 

Jack Shad per tb 25c Shore Haddock 

Green Beans D , D . Grapefruit 

Butter Beans Bunch Beets Oranges 

Green Peas op mac! Pineapples 

Tomatoe. Green ‘ Strawberries 

Asparagus New“cLrrots Georgia Peache » 

Summer Squash D Cantelopes 

Scallions Bananas Rhubarb 

Two Deliveries Daily — 10 A. M. and 2 P. M. 

One to Newtonville Every Afternoon 

Closed Wednesday at 12 o’clock Noon 
Saturday Evening 9.30 for the Summer 





The Newton Graphic. 


VOL. XLVII. — NO. 40 


NEWTON MASS., FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1919. 


TERMS, $2.50 A YEAR 


NEWTON HIGH SCHOOLS 

iraduatlng Exercises Held al Classical, Technical 
and Vocational Schools 


The Newton High Schools held their 
Iraduating exercises on Thursday, Fri- 
|ay and Saturday of last week, the Vo- 
utional High being on Thursday eve- 
ling, the Technical High on Friday 
ftvening, both being In the Technical 
lllgh School building, while the Classl- 
lal High graduated on Saturday after- 
loon in the Classical High School 
building. 

The Classical High School graduated 
|49, the Technical 98, and the Voca- 
|ionnl 21. 

ClnHsIcnl High 

The program Included a Salute to 
Ihe Flag, a most appropriate number 
Is Saturday was Flag Day, the class 
Iration on “Americanizing the For- 
lign born” by Robert S. Hayes, a poem 
|The Awakening of Italy” by Helen S. 
Allen, the Class History by Marjorie 
JC. Wentworth, the valedictory by Rob- 
|rt E. Anderson, Jr., the singing of the 
i ode, which was written by Edna 
MacGregor, and the presentation of 
.he diplomas by Mayor Edwin O. 
Childs. 

♦The most interesting feature of. the 
Irogram was the presentation of the 
ftlass gift, by Benjamin P. Lane, the 
llass president. The gift was a mem- 
Irial tablet bearing the names of the 
|6 boys from the school who gave 
■■heir lives during the war. The gift 
Tvas accepted by Mr. Enoch C. Adams, 
Ihe master of the school. 


The following names are inscribed 
on the tablet — 

Clark Alvord, ’17 
Albert E. Angler, T4 
Arthur K. Atkins, '13 
Richard A. Blodgett, T4 
Stafford L. Brown, '15 
Elliot A. Chapin, ’13 
Howard R. Clapp, ’ll 
Henry W. Clartie, T2 
Donald W. Curry, ’17 
Joseph E. Daley, Jr., T6 
Warren K. Daley, ’18 
Philip W. Davis, 04 
Frank D. Day, ’ll 
Victor L. Dennis, ’09 
Paul J. Farnum. ’17 
Robert L. Forbush, ’09 
JJalph Giles. T6 
Prescott W. Gould, ’13 
William F. Herrick. ’07 
Stephen T. Hopkins. TO 
George S. Huggard, T6 
Norman W. Hyslop, TO 
Leonard Jackson, T5 
Wallace M. Leonard. Jr., T2 
Malcolm B. Marsh. T9 
Clifford D. Meekins, T8 
Walter L. Merrill, ’07 
Thomas C. Nathan. T5 
Ellery Peabody, Jr.. T3 
David E. Putnam, T6 
Archibald H. Ramsay, ’03 
Wesley E. Rich, ’07 
Edwin S. Sampson. ’01 
(Continued on Page 3) 


BOARD OJF DIRECTORS 


SEWARD W. 
William F. Bacon 
Howard M. Biscoe 
Albert P. Carter 
Howard P. Converse 
James W. French 
S. Harold Greene 
Frank J. Hale 
Sydney Harwood 
Fred R. Hayward 


JONES, President 

Dr. Edward E. Hopkins 
George Hutchinson 
John F. Lothrop 
Franklin T. Miller 
Frederick S. Pratt 
James L. Richards 
George F. Schrafft 
G. Fred Simpson 
Frank H. Stuart 


30E 


IODOC 


STORAGE BATTERY SERVICE STATIONS 


THE ONLY NEWTON 





iaa.«na;.-aii 



An efficient and cov:rteou« t'r.-aniz.i- 
_ lien, promt ling the bast MET/ 'CDS, 

FUiil an! EQUIPMENT, 

LI— tortl.v,. direct at any point in 

New England 

wi.ti aLiliatio s throughout the 

Un u ed States 

Office* Chapels nr ! Worcrooms at 

P-nton and U-ookliro. 

• < ntrv i f (Iraui'r ito-um) 






■Oumresr 

jm. _u.ur.r. m. ■ ri il ii Vjg> Vi 


PICK TEMPORARY OFFICERS 

Returned Service Men to Organize the 

American Legion in This City 

* 

About two hundred men’ who had 
seen service in the army and navy 
were present Monday evening at the 
State Armory in West Newton for the 
purpose of taking the preliminary 
steps to form a local unit of the Amer- 
ican Legion. 

Capt. -Henry D. Cormerais called the 
meeting to order and was chosen tem- 
porary chairman and Mr. Henry W. 

| Strandquist served as secretary. Mr. 
Strandquist whb was one of the Massa- 
chusetts delegates to the St. Louis 
convention of the Legion and who also 
attended the meeting held at Worceter 
where the state association was organ- 
ized, gave a report of these conven- 
tions. 

The meeting favored the formation 
of a local unit and proceeded at once 
to elect temporary officers, and the 
names of Capt. Cormerais. Capt. Ed- 
ward Edmunds, Jr., Capt. C. Sinclair 
Weeks. Charles J. Mahoney of the Avi- 
ntion service and Wagoner Joseph L. 
Sheridan, among others who declined, 
were placed in nomination. Capt. Cor- 
merais called Major M. W. Murray to 
take the chair and after several sug- 
gestions as to the method of balloting, 
it. was finally voted that the chair as- 
sign certain portions of the hall to 
each candidate and that those who 
favored such candidate would gather 

(Continued on Page 3.) 


Newton Trust Company 

The advice and counsel of a Board 
of Directors composed of representative 
business men, eminently successful in their 
particular line, is a service at the disposal 
of every depositor. 


HONOR THEIR MEN 


Newton Highlands Extends a Welcome 
Home to Service Men 


In spite of the threatening weather 
on Tuesday the people of Newton High- 
lands gathered loyally to welcome their 
boys home. The exercises took place 
on a platform on the Hyde School 
grounds, where a band concert played 
from 2 to 3 o’clock. Then followed the 
more formal exercises. Mr. J. B. Stud- 
ley, president of the Improvement So- 
ciety, introduced Mayor Childs as the 
first speaker. The Mayor gave a splen- 
did tribute to the work of the boys 
"over there” and to their willingness 
to help wherever help was needed, call- 
ing attention to the fact that “over 
there” there was no distinction be- 
tween Catholic and Protestant, French 
and English, Italian and American, all 
being brothers in one great cause. He 
then pointed out the need of co-oper- 
ation over here, and the dangers that 
still beset our path, and said that it 
rested with us whether the country 
"climbs or slides.” 

A demonstration of the girls of the 
Hyde School then followed. Dressed 
in the costume of the Red Cross Nurse, 
they formed two lines across the plat- 
form and sang patriotic songs, particu- 
larly those that have become popular 
with the boys in service. Eel?n Clark 
and Marion Tapp r ~ acconp. nied by 
Adeline Badger and Dorothy Adams, vi- 
olinists. sang “Till We Meet Again” as 
(Continued on Page 2.) 


JOINT CELEBRATION 


Newton and Wellesley Lower Falls 
Entertain Soldiers 

That the patriotism of the Lower 
Falls both Newton and Wellesley sides 
of the river, was superior to all weath- 
er conditions was shown in the fact 
that notwithstanding the rain on 
Tuesday afternoon the parade in honor 
of the returned soldiers took place. In 
the procession were the children of the 
Fisk School, those of the Hamilton 
School, the women of the League, and 
those of St. John's Guild, the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians, the Foresters, 
and the soldiers and sailors with a 
very effective fife and drum corps. 

The parade ended at the Playground 
on Grove street, where the remainder 
of the program took place. 

The first speaker of the occasion was 
Major Schofield, introduced by Repre- 
sentative Bernard Early, who spoke of 
the difficulties still ahead of the nation, 
calling upon all to help in overcoming 
these. America was then sung, led by 
the Rev. A. J. Straight. 

Since the other speakers had not yet 
nrrived the audience adjourned to the 
baseball field where an excellent hall 
game was played between West New- 
ton and Wellesley in which Wellesley 
won 2-1. 

Congressman J. F. Fitzgerald of Bos- 
ton, the next speaker, after paying a 
beautiful tribute to Father Farrell and 
to Rev. Mr. Rollins for their splendid 

(Continued on Page 9.) 


Official C Wiliam 3 Dealers g 
ALL MAKES Of BATTERIES RECHARGED AND REPAIRED ° 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

Daniel L. Kenslea Co. 

791 WASHINGTON STREET, NEWTONV1LLE 

STARTING, LIGHTING AND IGNITION SERVICE STATION 

, 68 MAIN STREET, (Inside Service) WATERTOWN 

ono i" =3ono c_ _ .... i oc 


CILMOUR, ROTHERY dt COMPANY 

Insurance Underwriters 


120 WATER STREET, 


BOSTON 


S. T. BMJEMtY, NEWTON CKMTUli 


REMOVAL SALE 


Now is the time to buy those plants since we are 
selling them at cost. Plants for Gifts, House or 
Garden. 

We have either got to sell or dump them since we 
are going to grow cut flowers at our Wellesley estab- 
lishment in preference to plants. 

We shall celebrate our fifth business anniversary 
this Fall by opening up our old store opposite the 
Newton Depot where we shall serve our customers to 
better advantage. 

Cotton The Plorist 

Mount Ida Street, off Centre St., Newton 

Phone N. N. 1430 . 


WALNUT STREET WIDENED 

Important Matters Considered at Last Meeilng of 
Aldermen Before Vacation 


At a meeting which lasted long 
after midnight last Monday the aider- 
men acted upon many important mat- 
ters and adjourned for the summer' 
with practically everything except the 
improvement of the Oak Hill streets, 
cleared from its docket. 

Mayor Childs sent in his first veto of 
the year returning without approval 
the grant for a gasolene filling station 
in Nonantum square passed at the pre- 
vious meeting. 

Alderman Hollis said he would not 
oppose the veto but called attention to 
the fact that but slight opposition had 
been manifested before the committee, 
but after the action of the board, strong 
pressure had been brought to bear on 
the Mayor, led by the Newton Improve- 
ment Society and he suggested that In 
the future such organizations should 
he notified of petitions of this nature. 
He also read a letter from the Plan- 
ning Board which had made no opposi- 
tion to the proposed location. Aider- 
man Goodwin said that no opposition 
had been expressed this yea- because 
the matter had been so thoroly 
thrashed out a year or so ago that it 
was thought that no favorable action 
would be taken. Alderman Kendrick 
also spoke favoring the veto and the 
veto was sustained only four aider- 
men. Blake, Clement, Cole and Cook 
voting in opposition. 

No one onposed the -ocation of an 
Edison Light pole on Central street 
and it was subsequently granted. No 
one opposed the discontinuance of 
Sawaco road a? Chestnut hill and the 
order was passed later in the session. 

J^hn D. Harrington’s petition for a 
nubile e-arare at 757 Washington 
I Newtonville. was favored by the 

| ^etft’oner and opposed by Mr. George 
F. Wales in behalf of Miss Turner, an 
abettor. 

when the hearing on a location for a 
J pro^ocerj location for an incinerator on 
! Lewi® terrace was called. Alderman 
Whidden stated that the committee in 
charge had found so much opposition 
that it had concluded to abandon the 
proposed location and the hearing was 
n"* necessarv. 

Mayor Childs sent in many recom- 
mendations. the following receiving 
immediate favorable action. — accepting 
certain furniture from the Public Safe- 
tv committee in lieu of all claims, add- 
♦ ne $500 to Sewer unclassified account. 
*110 for electric lighting in library at 
Newton Highlands. $9,000 for purchase 
of about 15 acres of land on Elliot 
street for municipal purposes, for au- 
thority to execute indenture with Met- 
ropolitan Park Commission for land at 
Aub”-ndale for bath house purposes. 
fo^ *'<>0.30 for Laborers’ pensions, for 
Workmen’s Compensation for Frank 



STYLE AND QUALITY 

FEDERAL HAT CO. 

166 FEDERAL ST. 

NEAR HIGH ST. BOSTON 


Buterooan, that Federal Aid bonds of 
$25,000 be paid from Federal Aid In- 
come account, and that offer of A. F. 
Pierce to buy 3200 feet of land owned 
by city off Circuit avenue be accepted. 

The Mayor also sent in recommenda- 
tion for increase in salary of one clerk 
in the Assessors' Dept., for increase* 
in pay of certain Street. Dept, employ- 
ees. for $14,000 for resurfacing of Dud- 
ley road, and the recommendations of 
the Board of Health for a sewer in 
Prince street. 

The board approved the incorpora- 
tion of the Cl^flin Guard Veteran Asso- 
ciation with Robert C. Bridgham. Fred- 
eric P. Barnes. Martin C. Laffie. Fran- 
cis C L. Henderson. William Warren. 
Herbert M. Warren. Arthur C. Wal- 
worth. Reuben Forknall and Henry 
E. Both fold as incorporators. 

The Street Commissioner reported 
completion of sidewalks on Chapel 
street and betterment assessments 
were ordered levied on the abuttors. 

The Planning Board sent in reports 
approving the proposed widening of 
Walnut street at Newtonville square 
and asked for further time on the pro- 
posed widening of Dedham street. 

Petitions of the McClelland Auto 
Service for J. E. Blanchard for taxi- 
cabs. of Patty P. Calkins. Farlow road. 
Victor C. Cutler, Shorncliffe road, and 
H. E. Squires. Mill street, for private 
garages, for relocation of an Edison 
light pole on Cotton street, for Tele- 
phone attachments, on Lagrange street, 
for street sprinkling on Clark street. 
Woodbine street. Beaumont avenue. 
Prospect avenue. Grovehill avenue and 
Lake View avenue. Mrs. Catherine M. 
Daley for increase in Soldier's Relief 
and of E. M. Day for apportionment of 
assessment on Carver road were grant- 
ed. Other petitions werd received from 
James Bland for a wagon license. Eliza 
T. Symonds, Crofton road for private 
garage, for sewers in Wiltshire road 
and Wiltshire court, for the laying oat 
of Saxon terrace and of Ardmore road 
and Ardmore terrace, for drainage on 
Beaumont avenue. Prospect avenne. 
Grove Hill avenue and Lake View ave- 
nue. for curbing on Middle street, and 
of George Chartier. 1007 Chestnut 
street and C & D. Hagopian, 1209 
Chestnut street for victuallers’ licens- 
es. 

On recommendation of committees, 
sewers were ordered laid in Park View 
avenue, Cabot street. Linwood avenue. 
Commonwealth avenue and Prince 
street. Soldiers’ relief was granted 
Samuel A. Langley. $768 voted for 
Laborers’ Pensions, the extension of 
Langley road to Boylston street ap- 
proved at a cost of $2000. leave to with- 
draw granted on permits for multiple 
garages of E. B. Wilcox. Hermon ter- 
race. the Newton Real Estate Asso- 
ciates . rear 277 Walnut street, and on 
auto truck license for Waiter V. Hess. 
A permit for private garage was given 
I Alex. Smith. Bowen street, and auto li- 
censes granted J. J. Cady and J. F. 
Daley. 


There was some discussion of the 
majority report of the License commit- 
tee granting permit to Geo. W. Gordon 
(Continued on Page 4) 


TO LET — Two fine offices in 
Newton Bank Building. Apply 
to Newton Savings Bank. 


HUNTINGTON 

School For Boys 

11TH YEAR OPENS SEPT. 30 

Slimmer Session of Twelve Weeks 
Opens June 23 

Prepurt‘H for collcgwt nn«l technical 
school* and offer* *|t<H-lul llni*hing 
<-o u me* In hudlncMH ami technical sub- 
ject*. 

22 college and universtiy 
men teachers with at 
least 5 years’ experience. 

Unique plan of supervised study. 
Upper and Lower Schools. 

Unsurpassed equipment for 
physical training and 
athletic sports 

IRA A. PLANNER. A. M.. II cm I Master 
320 Huntington Avenue 

Boston 


DOLLS’ HOSPITAL, Inc. 

Dolls of every description repaired 
end ell mleelng perts supplied. 
Sleeping eyes e opeclelty. Wigs re- 
. curled. Teddy Beers repaired. Dolls 
Heads, Wigs end Novelties. Dolls 
* Dressmaking Complete line of 
| new dolls. Mall order* a specialty 

37 Temple Place, Boston 

Telephone 1341-W Beach 



j SEVENTY-SEVEN 
I YEARS OP EX- 
1 PKKIKNCK IN RE- 
NEWIN'! and RE- 
PAIRING of Al.L 
KINDS OP I.KAKY 
ItOOFK. ONLY 

FIRST CLASS work 
doue and CHARGES 
as REASON A1LLE 
os CONSISTENT with the REST 
of WORKMANSHIP. 

CA ItKFUL ESTIMATES and EX- 
PERT advice gladly given. 

E. B. BADGER & SONS GO. 

7ft PITTS ST.. IIOSTON, MASS. 
Tel. llaj market S7UO 


Camp Aloha Summer School 

Squnm Lake, Holderaess, X. H. 

Tutoring Scltool for Fall Examinations 
for School and College 

1(11 h Summer Session Begins 
July II, 1919 

Applications may be accepted up 
to September 6, but early applica- 
tion and entrance is advised. 
Directors 

Bit. EMERSON A. KIMBALL. 

St. Paul’s School, Concord, N. II. 
EDMUND W. OGDEN, 

<>0 State SL. Boston 

For booklets and application 
blanks, or further information, ad- 
dress 

Camp Aloha Summer School Association 

(10 STATE ST„ IIOSTON 
Tel. Main 6559 Newton West 9I I-.M 


Highest Cash Prices Paid 

For DIAMONDS 

Old Gold and Silver 
THE E. B. HORN CO. 

Est.lS39. 129 Washington St., Boston 


H. F. CATE 

Funeral Director 

AND 

Embalmer 

1251 Washington Street 
West Newton 


Cash for Old Gold and Silver 

C. A. W. CROSBY & SON 

Jewelers 

480 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

Watches, Jewelry and Silverware Re- 
paired by Experienced Workman 


DIAMONDS Norling & Bloom Co. 

UiniTIUIlUU <KMttbllHh«xl IM& 3 ) 
BOUGHT 3«: WASHINGTON ST. 

A *** toe4 T,l. SSt HM MM 


High Above the Heat of the City 

As cool and delightful as the veranda of a mountain resort 

ROOF GARDEN 

Singing Every Evening 

HOTEL WESTMINSTER, Copley Square, Boston 


NEWTON CENTRE 

$8250.o<> 


Stucco House, 9 rooms, 2 baths, 
modern, 10,000 sq. feet of land 


HENRY W. SAVAGE, Inc. 

Established 1840 

564 COMMONWEALTH AVE„ NEWTON CENTRE 
Newton South 1640 


FRED L. GRHWFORD. IDG. 

Funeral Director 

49 ELMWOOD STREET 

NEWTON 


Complete Equ;pmei.t for City and 
Out of Town Service 

LADY ASSISTANT 

Auto Heart* and Limousines 
Telephone: Newton North 3300 


AL JOLSON 

Sings exclusively fur Columbia rec- 
ords. Come in and hear his new 
records from “Slnbad." 

Columbia Grafonolas 

$20 and up 


Burke's Drug Store 

295 CENTRE STREET 
NEWTON 


MORTGAGES 

A limited number, secured by Newton Property, now 
needed for investment of Savings Department. 

Amount limited to 60 'i of Appraised Value of Property 

Newton Trust Company 


NEWTONVILLE 


NEWTON CENTRE 
AUBURNDALE 



3fi Saving Money for the Saver 


' Two reasons account for the fact that our kind 
of savings institution pays the biggest return on 
savings. 

THE FIRST REASON is because our system of operating is right — 
low expense of management and careful administration of funds. 
THE SECOND REASON '> because w c are willing to pay over what 
is saved by careful management to our shareholders — no one “on 
the iuslJe” is getting rich in this :t: stitt.tioa. 

JUNE SHARES ON SALE. START NOW? 
DIVIDENDS AT 5^' < COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY 

Watertown Co-operative Bank 

Main Office, 60 MAIN ST. Hours: 9 to 3. Thurs. Evenings, 7 to 9 
Branch Office, S49 Ml AUBURN ST. Hours: f to 3. Tues. Eva. 7 to 9 




THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1919. 


J 


A REAL DELICACY 

BRIGHAM’S 
_ CREAM 

will add richness to your summer 
dishes. Fruits with rich cream are 
much better than heavy puddings. 

Serve more cream with the meals 
— it makes the choicest dishes. 
Brigham’s Cream is pure and pas- 
teurized in the sealed bottle. 

Order Today 

C. BRIGHAM CO. 


Camb. 262 


CHURCH NOTICE 


First Church of Christ. Scientist, of 
Newton. Player's Hall. Washington 
street. West Newton. Sunday service 
10.45 A. M. Subject of lesson-sermon: 
“Is the Universe. Including Man. 
Evolved by Atomic Force?” Sunday 
School 10.45 A. M. Testimonial meet- 
ing Wednesday 8 P. M. 


COPLEY THEATRE— “Are You a 
Mason?” will be continued for a third 
week, beginning Monday evening, at 
the Copley Theatre. For laughing 
purpose throughout its entire three 
acts. “Are You a Mason” amply fills 
the bill. It is sufficiently cheerful to 
chase away all the germs of melan- 
choly. and to increase the joy of those 
who are already joyful. “There were 
professional laughers in the audi- 
ence,” wrote one critic, “amateur 
laughers, impromptu laughers, and 
laughters who simply laughed because 
they felt simply like laughing. Some 
of them began to laugh as soon as the 
curtain went up, before the actors 
had had time to open their mouths, 
and some of them, unless their ma- 
chinery has run down, we suppose are 
laughing yet.” 


MILLINERY SALE 

MLLE. CAROLINE 

' Many of Her Exclusive Models 
fiave Now Reached the Department 

$5.00 and $6.00 

No Two Alike in Form or Color 
480 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON 
Block of Brunswick Hotel 


SUMMER COMFORTS! 

Vudor Porch Shades keep 
your piazza and sleeping 
porch cool and shady. 
Come in all sizes. We have 
the most comfortable and 
attractive porch furniture 
including lamps, chairs 
and tables. Prices are right. 
Wayne Cedar cd Bags for 
putting away winter cloth- 
ing — and evening clothes 
- — guaranteed to keep all 
dust and moths from in- 
juring garments. Fine for 
furs and fur coats. 

BEMIS & JEWETT 

Newton Centre and Needham 


MEHR— IRELAND 


On June 17th, Miss Frances A. Ire- 
land of Ward street, Newton Centre, 
was married to Mr. Ernest J. Mehr of 
Hartford. Conn. The ceremony took 
place at the Church of the Sacred 
Heart and was performed by Father 
T. A. Curtin. The best man was Mr. 
John J. Mahony, Jr., of Roxbury, and 
the bridesmaid. Miss Josephine Ire- 
land, sister of the bride. The bride 
wore a gown of white satin and chif- 
fon cloth with tulle veil decorated 
with orange blossoms. She carried 
a bouquet of bridal roses. The brides- 
maid was dressed in a salmon georg- 
ette gown and wore a black tulle hat. 
Her roses matched her gown. 

The church was prettily decorated 
with palms, pink and white peonies 
and carnations. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mehr will live in Hart- 
ford. Conn. 


CARPENTERS STRIKE 


Union carpenters in the Newton dis- 
trict, which comprises the Newtons. 
Waltham. Watertown. Wellesley and 
Natick, went on strike this week for 
an increase from seventy cents to one 
dollar an hour. There are about 2000 
carpenters involved and they are the 
members of seven locals. A meeting 
was held between committees of the j 
men and employers, and an increase 
was offered but rejected. Neither side 
would state how much this increase 
was. 


THE NEAR EAST 


REAL ESTATE 


List Your 

REAL ESTATE 

with 

J. Edward Catlanan 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 
AUCTIONEER 

271 WASHINGTON STREET 
NEWTON 


John T. Burns & Sons report that 
they have sold for Robert T. Fowler 
his new brick home situated at No. 
350 Waverley avenue, Newton, in the 
Farlow Hill section. The property 
which has just been completed by Mr. 
Fowler has 10 rooms. 3 baths, garage, 
and together with a corner lot of 9S00 
square feet is conveyed to Professor 
Charles L. Norton who will occupy. 
The property which is new is not yet 
assessed, but is valued at $19,000. 

John T. Burns & Sons report that 
they have sold for Harry B. Eaton his 
single frame 10 room home situated 
at No. 190 Mount Vernon street in the 
West Newton Hill section. Alfred T. 
Haskell purchases for a home. With 
the house there are 12,000 square feet 
of land and the total assessment is 
$5500. Ellen Lancaster purchases for 
a home and will occupy. 

John T. Burns & Sons have also 
sold to Vincent D. Squires a lot of 
land on .Mill street, Newtonville, con- 
taining 7500 square feet. Mr. Squires 
is erecting a frame colonial house 
valued at $1J.000 which is already un- 
der agreement of sale through the 
Burns agency. 

j The same agency report that they 
I have sold for Frederick A. Foss his 
i single 8 room colonial home situated 
at No. 338 Central street, Auburndale. 

I With the house there are 8200 square 
| feet of land and the total assessment 
j is $0000. Charles Patterson of Boston 
purchases for a home. 

John T. Burns & Sons have also 
sold for Walter L. Coombs his two- 
! family frame house situated at Nos. 
j 9 and 11 Simpson terrace. Newtonville. 
j Nobel F. and Catherine F. McCaffrey 
j were the purchasers and will occupy 
one suite. With the house there are 
about 13,000 square feet of land and 
j the total assessment is $6600. 


The following letter gives an excel- 
lent idea of conditions as they exist in 
the Near East. 

Ordan, Turkey. 

Wed., Apr. 23, 1919. 
Dear Newton Family: 

This is the 10th or 11th letter, I think 
Am not sure as I have not my little 
book which tells, with me. In case 
you haven't received my last ones, will 
say that I left Constantinople Mar. 30 
on “Katoomba” for Batum, arriving 
Apr. 1. and took English Destroyer 
back to Trebizond on Apr. 2. where 
Ann and l have been staying at the 
Mission House, Rev. and Dr. Stapleton 
in charge. There we have assisted in 
clothing the naked and feeding the 
hungry. Last Sunday, Easter, instead 
of having a service in the English 
Protestant Church as planned, Mr. 
Stapleton and interpreter. Ann and I 
took a a small steamer “Sheffield” for 
Kerassunde, six hours west, as we had 
to go when a boat came in. We had 
$4000 in our pockets to divide between 
Kerassunde and Ordon. and wished to 
investigate the two places. 

It rained when we landed at K. at 
5.30, but no damage done, and we were 
glad to pass thro the wall doors into 
a lovely garden with broad stone steps 
leading up to a large square stone 
house, the home of M. Neophytos, a 
well-to-do Greek writer on scientific 
subjects. The wisteria was in full 
bloom, also pear, apple and plum trees 
were well leaved out. We were wel- 
comed and ushered into a richly fur- 
nished reception room where neigh- 
bors were calling. Their Easter sea- 
son or Pasque. lnsts for several days, 
with firing of cannon, rockets early 
Easter morn, church, then calls are 
made Sun.. Mon. and, Tues., all of 
which are holidays, with merry-go- 
rounds and swings and dances and 
music for the young people on Mon. 
and Tues. Hard boiled eggs dipped in 
red dye. or red and blue, with the 
white strip between in our honor, are 
on the table every meal. Each one 
whacks the end of his neighbor’s egg 
and if it doesn’t crack, it’s good luck 
for him. Eggs are plentiful here. 

About 8.30 o’clock dinner was served, 
namely, 1st course, eggs, pickled fish 
and bread, 2nd, barley soup, 3rd, little 
packets of rice and meat done up in 
grape leaves and boiled in fat, 4th, 
meat balls and potatoes, 5th, youghort, 
6th, apples and oranges from their 
own garden, 7th. Turkish coffee after 
leaving table. Plates and forks are 
changed each course. No wonder they 
need two maids. 

In the family are Monsieur and 
Madam and their 18-year old daugh- 
ter. Antheis, very sweet ladies. Mad- 
am’s father is a great general of the 
Greek Army, Republican, and his fath- 
er was a great warrior, whose statue 
stands in a square of Athens, named 
Karenskaki. Our bedroom was most 
charming, silk comforters, sheets hem- 
stitched all around, square pillows, 
hard as bricks with drawn work. A 
delightful sleep we had. 

Breakfast consists usually of tea in 
glasses, Easter cake, toast, and eggs 
at Easter, at least. Kerassunde is not 
as large as Trebizond. It had a popu- 
lation of 25,000, 15,000 Greeks and 
1.000 Armenians. Now there are about 
30 Armenians in the orphanage. Oth- 
ers will be coming back as the Turks 
have been ordered to give up the 
Armenian children whom they have 
taken into their homes as servants, or 
wives for their sons. 

130 Greek orphans are housed in the 
school. When we called, they were re- 
ceiving each a piece of corn bread, and 
a big bowl of soup made of corn, beans 
and meat, which they ate at low tables, 
sitting on their toes. At night each 
had a small mattress and blanket on 
floor. To them we gave $300 and some 
cloth. 

The Armenian refugees were repre- 
sented by anotliej committee to whom 
we gave $100, also $300 to be used for 
buying weaving machines and cotton 


to be gotten from Constantinople. 

Another committee takes $800 to buy of the sea and hills behind the city. 


the crowd. Our White Star gives us 
privileges, and many trips free. 

Several Mohammedans came up 
where there was room enough to do 
their prayers. They take off their 
skin or hide slippers, spread a dirty 
towel down to bow on. They face 
Mecca (S. E.) mutter their prayers, 
kneel, bow down their face to the 
floor. 

We sailed quite close to the shore, 
from which the hills rise quite abrupt- 
ly. green and wooded, with occasional 
villages, and back of all are high 
mountains. 

After a three hours’ trip we an- 
chored and boarded a large rowboat 
with our much baggage and ap- 
proached the pier which was black 
with people, the whistle of the steamer 
having announced our arrival. The 
swell of the sea bumped our boat 
against the steps, but we hopped and 
were hauled up to be greeted by the 
Greek Orthodox bishop. Altho not 
Catholic, many of their forms are de- 
cidedly so. There is much ceremony 
in their service, kissing the pictures of 
Christ and the saints, candles, crossing 
oneself, kissing the Bishop’s and 
priests’ hand. etc. He is mostly hat. 
hair, beard and gown, and they all 
look alike. 

Other friends, members of the Greek 
Protestant Church, greeted us, and we 
all. a long procession, were escorted to 
Dr. Sideropoulos’ house. 

This city of 15.000 before the war, 
was both bombarded and the Greeks 
and Armenians sent away, the Armen- 
ians getting the worst treatment, of 
course; but the Greeks, 800. lost every- 
thing they had. tho some of the houses 
were not burned as were the Armen- 
ians. only shelled by the Russians. 
The Greeks at Kerassunde were not 
driven out of the city, neither was it 
bombarded. The doctor’s house here 
was destroyed, so he and his family, 
wife and three daughters, 12, 15, 18, 
are now living in a small house, beds 
made up on the floor, and very little 
furniture. They put up two beds for 
Ann and me and have treated us roy- 
ally. People in this country eat well. 
Meat once or twice a day, in fact two 
dinners as a rule, but not a heavy 
breakfast, 7 A. M.. 12 M., and 7.30 or 
8 are the usual dining hours. And 
very good things they have besides 
meat combinations of rice, with meat 
or vegetables. 

The day after our arrival we re- 
ceived many calls from Greeks and 
Armenians, and the Turkish official 
and mullah (priest) called to ask aid. 
Our flour will help them in bringing 
down the price of bread. I drank 
Turkish coffee with them. 

We visited the Greek and Armenian 
orphans in schoolhouses, and other 
places of interest. 

One enjoyable occasion was a dinner 
party at the home of the Greek Bishop, 
served by a sister and two daughters, 
who keep house for him. Let me name 
the ten courses: 1. pickled fish, olives, 
(ripe and oily), and cheese. 2, barley 
soup, 3. boiled chicken, 4. cold fried 
fish and greens with hard boiled eggs, 
5, pot roast and fried potatoes, 6, ar- 
tichoke and onions, 7, youghort. 8, 
baklavar (delicious pastry with hon- 
ey), 9, oranges, 10, coffee. After din- 
ner we had some music on piano and 
mandolin, then we visited the Greek 
school for young children and heard 
their songs. 

Then took a walk along the water, 
rather a bluff above the water where 
the natural scenery is very beautiful, 
to a large house up above the road 
with roses, fig trees, nut trees, and 
long grass, just like any New England 
yard, and this, if you please, is to be 
our summer home, for we have de- 
cided to make this our headquarters. 
Ann, Miss Voigt, and myself. Our 
winter or permanent home is right in 
the centre of the city, but high above 
the turmoil, for we can have the third 
floor of a large building, the first of 
which is a wine shop or restaurant, 
and the second is to be a new club for 
the elite. It is very high studded, with 
lots of windows, and a roof garden 
over all. which commands a fine view 


JUHOMOBIAlNSUeANCB 

AT COST 
• Wiy Pc> y l[lore ■ 

Massachusetts Mutual Auto. Ins. Ca 
Automobile Mutual Liability Ins. Co. 
40 Central Street, Boston 


Merchant’s Co-operative Bank 

19 Milk Street, Boston 

BERTRAM D. BLA1SDELL ALBERT E. DUFF1LL 

President Treasurer 

Money to loan on Real Estate 
First mortgages only Owner and occupant preferred 
Assets, $6,601,378.76 

Dividends for past year at rate of 5J4% per annum 

BEGIN NOW TO PAY OFF THAT MORTGAGE 
June Shares Now on Sale 


seed to be distributed to Greeks in out- 
outside villages, an equal amount to 
be returned at harvest time. By dol- 
lars I mean liras, each equal to $1.20. 

By the end of another month we 
hope that our supplies, cloth, thread, 
canned milk, flour, etc., will have ar- 
rived and that Ann and I. or others 
will be settled there with work well in 
hand. That city was not bombarded 
by the Russians or occupied by them, 
but all the Armenians were killed and 
the Greeks were allowed to stay only 
by payment of money. Children, Ar- 
menians, were starved and they died 
100 a week, and anywhere one can dig 
up their skeletons. 

The city is attractively located on 
the hillside, with mountains in the 
background. We walked up to the 
Acropolis, where people were lounging 
around, or playing and singing. Sheep 
were grazing. A very peaceful and at- 
tractive picture in the bright sunlight 
with the blue Black Sea 'at our feet. 

These friends speak French, and not 
English — so, perforce, we were obliged 
to converse in that language, and I 
succeeded in understanding and mak- 
ing myself understood — I am glad I 
had such good instruction in High 
School. 

Two Turks called about ten o’clock. 
One young and handsome, had attend- 
ed Robert College and received degree 
from University of Edinburgh. He 
told us about the Turkish orphans, 400 
who need help, but the only help we 
can give them is American flour for 
sale at a reasonable price, which will 
| reduce the price of bread for the poor 
people. His uncle is a one legged 
Turk who has terrorized the Armen- 
ians and killed many. Now he is in 
the woods hiding with 150 men. 

Tuesday we said good bye to our 
good friends, who wish us to settle 
there, so they can learn English and 
teach us to speak French fluently. We 
boarded the Turkisjh steamer Ismir 
(name for Smyrna). It wus loaded 
with Turkish refugees, who were 
packed in down below pretty thickly, 
with their bedding, bread and nuts. 
We met a French monsieur, return 
ing to Constantinople, at the home of 
our friends, and invited him to dine 
with us as the boat faro was not fit to 
eat. We had bread, salmon, chipped 
beef warmed in evaporated milk, on a 
sterno, cocoa, jam, und raisins, quite 
an uppctlzing meal. We believe in 
carrying our food with us, also our 
folding cots and blankets in cuse we 
stuy on the bout over night. We are 
usuully allowed up above, away from 


must say our trunks stand a better 
chance of holding together with their 
handling than by expressmen. 

The bed bug is a clever little cuss — 
If your bed legs are in water, so 
there’s no approach that way he climbs 
up the wall to the coiling', to a spot 
over the bed, then detaches himself 
and comes plump down on the bed or 
your face. If you have a net over, he 
crawls around until he makes an en- 
trance, and bide his time, but I make 
them keep their distance by sprinkling 
bug powder around my head. The 
Greeks and Armenians wear the fez, 
because they are afraid not to, being 
Turkish subjects. 

Stove pipes (not hats) run thro a 
hole in the window. To keep us warm 
in a cool room we have a manzale, a 
big brass receptacle, with live coals of 
charcoal and it3 very nice when chilly. 
They cook over them, also. 

No mail yet but most likely we’ll find 
something when we get back. Sun. On 
board small steamer all night, sat. upon 
chairs and slept. Arrive at 5 tonight. 
90 miles. 14 hours by slow steamer. 
Have our own food. Turkish refugees 
all over the boat and near us. We had 
the use of the captain’s stateroom, but 
bed was too lively to use. Very calm 
today on Black Sea. Ann and I enjoy 
the sail. 

Jane. 


WINS CHAMPIONSHIP 


Newton High won the Suburban 
League championship for 1919 Tues- 
day afternoon, shutting out Everett 
High. 2 to 0. at Claflin Field, Newton- 
ville, in a game full of thrills. 

Umpire Bill Remmert was forced to 
make many close decisions. One in 
the fifth was questioned by the fans. 
With two out and Capt. Roy Kelley at 
third, he attempted to steal home. 
Everett contended that Sawyer of 
Newton made a balk, but Kelley was 
caught out and the umpire refused to 
allow the claim. 

In the eighth, when Arthur Brickley 
tried to steal second, Seavey threw 
low to Wallace Richmond, who 
scooped the ball out of the earth and 
tagged his man. 

For a time it looked as if the ball 
game would be forfeited to Newton be- 
cause of the objection raised by Ever- 
ett, the claim being that Richmond 
dropped the ball. Brickley stated that 
Richmond did not drop it. 

Sawyer had a prominent part in the 
ball game and did more than any other 
player to win the title. Only two hits 
were made on his delivery, the first 
coming in the fifth by Capt. Roy Kel- 
ley and the other in the eighth by 
Arthur Brickley. He passed two and 
struck out seven. 

At the conclusion of the game John 
Seavey. the catcher, was elected cap- 
tain for 1920. 


N. H. S. 


The coaches for the eight schools 
represented in the Suburban League 
have made their selections for an all- 
scholastic team, and two Newton High 
boys appear in the list approved by 
a majoritys Fred Sawyer being the 
unanimous choice for pitcher, and 
George Owen having 5 votes for third 
base. Richmond had two votes for 
shortstop and Moore, two votes for 
left field. The Transcript correspond- 
ent has the following to say about 
Sawyer: 

“Fred Sawyer of Newton, right- 
hander, has borne the heavy pitching 
duties for his teaju in nervy fashion 
and his unanimous selections is most 
pleasing. He had no close rival as a 
boxman. 

“Saywer has speed, curves, control 
and a change of pace. A majority of 
the players in the league agreed that 
he had ‘everything.’ Batsmen with 
high averages swung wildly at times 
when Sawyer’s offerings were far 
from perfect, an indication that he 
could guage weaknesses and outguess 
his opponents.” 


They will do anything in their power 
for us, and. we are anticipating our 
return within two or three weeks. 
There is no regular mail steamer yet, 
as at Trebizond. so presume our mail 
will be irregular both going and com- 
ing. We will have a woman cook and 
keep house for us, if we are too busy 
to do anything, but I imagine we’ll 
find time to make some good American 
dishes. It’s now Sat. P. M., and we’ve 
been waiting since Thursday for a 
steamer to take us back to Trebizond. 
Might just as well be on a desert isl- 
and. so cut off are we. 

We expected the mail boat to stop 
but it didn’t, so this letter has to wait 
over until next Friday. Rather hard 
on the people who entertain us, but 
they seem to enjoy us. and are antici- 
pating our return. We shall have to 
bring our household goods from Trebi- 
zond, as nothing is to b*- had here, ex- 
cept at high prices. The Turks took 
all the pianos and the one church 
organ there were in the city. The 
Bishop went after his and got it. An- 
other was returned and is now in this 
house. The girls enjoy it and play 
familiar tunes. The Turks say they 
will give the things back to the own- 
ers, some may and some may not. As 
I look out upon the street, from my 
upper window. I see a family of tramp 
Turks in rags, just settling down to 
camp under a ruined building opposite. 
The child is searching her rags for 
live stock, poor thing. A lame donkey 
wanders by, a coW or two, boys with 
dough in a big pan on their heuds, to 
be baked at the bakery. Children with 
bare feet pattering over the pavements, 
horses loaded with wood or corn 
stalks, buffalo may be seen also, a mild 
variety, used for milk and for hauling. 
There are no wagons, much less car- 
riages, in this city, and us for uutos 
won’t a ride be appreciated when I get 
back to U. S.! as also will bananas, 
milk and ice cream. All bugguge, fur- 
niture, heavy beams, wood, etc., are 
carried on the bucks q* camels, and I 


HONOR THEIR MEN 


(Continued from Page 1) 


WEDDING GIFTS 
In 

Percolators and ( haling 
Dishes 

Trays and Table Cutlery 

>41 SUMMER ST. BOSTON 


© Q> 


a duet. Other duets were “The Rose 
in No Man’s Land” by Elsie Wilkie and 
Adeline Badger, and “The Long, Long 
Trail” by Dorothy Drowne and Helen 
Clark, and a solo by Ruth Swail, "On 
the Road to Home, Sweet Home.” 

The second speaker. Colonel Lawton, 
emphasized the part played by the 
mothers, sisters, and sweethearts at 
home, and told what their letters had 
meant to the boys. He also gave a 
brief summary of the History of the 
United States in War. and concluded 
with the statement that it was the 
unity of our people which brought the 
war to a successful end. 

Augustus Furdon of the 101st, a 
graduate of the Hyde School then 
spoke on behalf of the boys in the ser- 
vice expressing their gratitude to the 
Red Cross, Y. M. C. A., K. of C., and 
other organizations which stood so 
nobly behind them. 

Mr. Studley said that the people of 
Newton Highlands, wishing to have all 
of those from the Highlands, who had 
served in the war in any capacity have 
some permanent memorial to keep, had 
prepared medals with the figure of Lib- 
erty on one side and the name of the 
receiver on the other to be given to 
each man and woman in the service 
Ho then read the names of those who 
had answered a higher call during 
which the audience stood, the men 
with heads uncovered. Those who 
were present then came forward and 
received tho medals presented by 
Mayor Childs. Arrangement was also 
made to send the medals to those un- 
able to be present. 

America was then sung and the in- 
vited guests were invited to the Kin- 
dergarten room or the Hyde School 
where a banquet, was served. Duncing 
concluded tho program. 

The committee In charge wore Mr. 
Howard Whitmore, chairman, Mr. S. 
Arthur Thompson, secretary, Mr. 
Fred R. Hayward, treasurer, Mrs. 
Louis H. Marshall representing the 
Red Cross, in charge of the invita- 
tions, Mrs. A. S. Hutchinson represent- 
ing tho Woman’s Club in charge of the 
refreshments, and Mr. J. I). Studley, 
President of the Improvement Asso- 
ciation. Mr. C. H. Linghum of the 
Men’s League, Mr. Wallace Nichols of 
the Men’s Club, Mr. G. W. Taylor of 
tho Boy Scouts, Mr. Mitchell of the 
Constabulary, Mr. C. D. Miller of tho 
Hyde School, und Alderuiun Sumner 
Clement. 


“THE CLEAN-UP” 

Mrs. Housewife makes a quick, easy 
job of the dinner dishes. She has plenty 
of steaming hot water for household 
use nowadays. She uses the New Per- 
fection Hot Water Heater, and gets 
apartment house convenience in a 
country cottage. 

Her meals are perfectly cooked on the New 
Perfection Oil Cook Stove. Its steady blue 
flame furnishes intense, concentrated cooking 
heat. Heat for frying, baking, broiling, boil- 
ing and simmering. Easy to light, clean and 
refill. 1, 2, 3 and 4 burner sizes — with or 
without ovens and cabinets. 

More than 3,000,000 homes have them. At 
your dealer’s. 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

NEW PERFECTION! 

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Also Puritan Cook Stoves — 
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Insurance Description 

Real Estate 2z*£ l £?" n9 

T. Vf YLLAUK TRtTIM 
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Justice of the Peace 

NuPl Bank Building, YT. Newton 

Tel 


BOSTON BRASS ANDIRON CO. 

83 HAVERHILL STREET 
Niiur North Station Entrance (up one flight) 
Telephone Richmond 2374 
We carry a large stock of Andirons, Fire 
Sets, Fenders and Screens from which 
you may select patterns to suit . 
any period of architecture. jp 

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PAXTON’S 

CONFECTIONER CATERER 

Weddings and receptions, 
catered to in superior style. 
Simple, and most elaborate 
menus sent upon request. 

Call Newton North 68 


LostSavingsBankBool 

Savings Bank Books as listed beloi 
are lost and application has been madf 
for payments of the accounts In accord! 
ance with Sec. 40, Chap. 690, of the AotT 
of 1908 and amendments. 1 

Newton Savings Hank Hook No. 1617| 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. , 
Middlesex, ss. 

1’ ROB ATE COURT. 


ADMINISTRATOR'S SALE OF 
CAPITAL STOCK 


Pursuant to an order of the Probate 
Court and of every other enabling 
power, the Administrator of the Estate 
of JAMES W. SULLIVAN, late of New- 
ton, deceased, for the purpose of sett- 
ling said estate, WILL SELL AT PUB- 
LIC AUCTION, at 144 DEDHAM 
STREET, NEWTON HIGHLANDS, 
Mass., on MONDAY, JUNE 23rd, at 
TEN o’clock in tho forenoon, FIFTY- 
THREE (53) shares of the capital 
stock in T. D. SULLIVAN & SONS 
COMPANY, a corporation duly organ- 
ized under the laws of tho Common- 
wealth of Massuchiufutts and having a 
principal place of business in said 
Newton. 

Terms Caali — ten per cent, of tho 
purchase prico at the time and place 
of sale; balance in cash on transfer 
of shares, in or within five duys after 
sale. 

T. J. Sullivan, Administrator, 
114 Dedham Street, 
Newton Highlands, Muss. 
Juno 16, 1919 Advt 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin ami 
all other persons interested in th| 
estate of Martha A. II. Tolman latl 
of Newton in said County, deceased! 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to be the lust will und test 
turnout of said deceased has been prel 
seated to said Court, for Probate, bff 
Emma F. Tolniau who prays that let! 
ters testamentary may bo issued tf 
her, the executrix therein namodf 
without giving a surety on her otflciaf 
bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear 
a Probate Court, to be held at Can 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, o| 
the seventh day of July A. D. 1919, ul 

nine o'clock in the forenoon, to show 
cause, if any you have, why the suis| 
should not be granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby dl 
rooted i«> give public notice thereol 
by publishing this citation ones i| 
each week, for thre< I 

weeks, in the Newton Graphic a newC 
paper published in Newton the led 
publication to bo one day, at len,$l 
before said Court, and i>y maUlgl 
posl paid, or delh ering a copy in' tiif 
citation to ail known persons into| 
ested in the estake, seven days 
least before said Court. 

Witness, Charles J. >1 el nl Ire, El 

quire, Fli s i Jufige ol said ( lourt, I ii| 
thirteenth day of I uno in i ho > • ur *'"1 
thousumt nine hundred and uluetoef 
K M. ESTY, Register. 
Juno 20-27-July 4. 




THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1010. 


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DEATH OF MR. WOODBERRY 


Mr. Horace E. Woodberry, for near- 
ly forty years, a well known business 
man of West Newton, died early last 
Saturday morning, at his home on 
Parsons street, after several months 
of failing health. Mr. Woodberry was 
born in Beverly Farms, Mass., October 
14, 1843, and was educated at Peirce 
Academy at Middleboro. Following 
his marriage in 1869 he engaged in 
business at Amherst, N. H., where for 
■eight years he was the postmaster by 
appointment of Presdent Grant, re- 
moving to West Newton in 1881; 
where he since conducted a grocery 
store. 

Mr. Woodberry was a charter mem- 
ber of Newton Lodge, I. O. O. F., and 
Jook an active part in its work, and 
was a member of the Lodge quartet 
for many years. He was also a mem- 
ber of Dalhousie lodge of Masons. 
Musical in his tastes, he sang for a 
number of years in the choir of the 
Second Church. 

Mr. Woodberry is survived by a 
widow, one son, Mr. Dwight L. Wood- 
fcerry and one daughter, Miss Ethel 
M. Woodberry of West Newton. 

The attendance at the funeral serv- 
ices held on Tuesday afternoon, filling 
the house to overflowing, and the 
many tributes of flowers, bore elo- 
quent testimony of the esteem in 
which he was held, and which were 
Admirably expressed in the remarks 
of Rev. J. Edgar Park, pastor of the 
Second Church. The burial was in 
the family lot at Beverly, Mass. 


FAIRY PLAY TO BE REPEATED 


In response to many requests the 
children of the Garden Club will re- 
peat their fairy play Titania or the 
Butterflies Carnival on Saturday after- 
noon, June 21, at 3.30, “In the Garden” 
at Mrs. F. M. Ferris’ resdence, 35 Hun- 
newell avenue, Newton. The play was 
so successful when given on June 12 
that .the children made seventy-five 
dfflars for the benefit of the Boston 
Floating Hospital. 


W es t Ne wton 

— Hon. John W. Weeks has been re- 
cently re-elected a vice-president of 
the Middlesex Club. 

— Among the graduates this week 
from Milton Academy was Roger D. 
Hale of Bigelow road. 

— Miss Katherine Adams took part 
in the senior dramatics, held Friday 
evening at Smith College. 

— West Newton Co-operative Bank. 
Start an account tills month. 1 to 40 
shares at $1.00 each. Advt. 

— Miss Lucy Allen has returned from 
Smith College, where she was one of 
the marshals in the Alumnae Parade. 

— Mr. Thomas A. Crimmins of Dart- 
mouth street was one of the marshals 
at Harvard Commencement this week. 

— Miss Margaret M. Warren and 
Miss Katherine Adams graduated this 
week with the degree of A.B. at Smith 
College. 

— Mr. Edmund W. Ogden of Margin 
street is an incorporator in the recent- 
ly organized Bonanza Development Co. 
of Boston. 

— Miss Priscilla Buntin of Temple 
street graduated this week from the 
school of secretarial studies at Sim- 
mons College. 

— Mr. Clifton H. Dwinell of Berke- 
ley street is a member of the execu- 
tive committee of the recently organ- 
ized Republican league of Massachu- 
setts. 

— Miss Margaret M. Warren of 
Lenox street was in her sophomore 
year at Smith College, the chairman 
of the Music Committee for the Soph- 
omore Reception given the freshmen. 

— Miss Katherine Adams of Lenox 
street, who graduated this week from 
Smith College took quite a prominent 
part in the graduating exercises. Miss 
Adams, not only was awarded special 
honors in music, but also won by com- 
petition the privilege of singing the 
aria at the concert of the Musical De- 
partment on Monday, and also sang a 
solo at the Ivy Day exercises. Miss 
Adams also took part in the senior 
dramatics. 


■ 


CAMBRIDGE 


E> CfKTML sa. THEATBt-' 

Our Wonderful Ventilntlnjc SyHtem 
make* thin theatre the cooleet In 
Greater Bouton. 

MON., TUK8., WED. 

NAZIMOVA 

IN 

The Red Lantern 

EXTRA ADDED ATTRACTION 

HARRY JOLSON 

(Al’s Brother) 
Vaudeville’s Great Star 
and 

Four Other Big Acts 

Latest Mack Sennett Comedy 
HEARTS AND FLOWERS 

Organ Recital — Hurry Rodger* 
TIIURS., FBI., SAT. 

ETHEL CLAYTON 
in “Vicky Van”, 

ALL NEW VAUDEVILLE 


BIG SUNDAY CONCERT 

FREE AUTO PARKING 

Dally ut 3 and 7.30. Sat. Continuous 
1.30 to 10.30. Tel. Cuinh. (100. Heats 
Reserved One Week In Advance, Ex- 
cept Hut. Spec. Mut. Prices, 11c & 17c 


LEONA’S 

HOME-MADE CANDIES 

1252 WASHINGTON STREET 
WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Tel. Newtiwi West 1256-R 
'CHOCOLATES AND BON-BONS 
, Made Fresh Every Day 
Ice Cream Served Also 


PUBLIC INSTALLATION 


The recently elected officers of Dal- 
housie Lodge of Masons were publicly 
installed last Friday evening at Ma- 
sonic headquarters at Newtonville, 
the ceremonies being in charge of Dis- 
trict Deputy George H. Dale, assisted 
by P. W. M. Wesley Monk. The fol- 
lowing officers were installed. 

Charles H. Clark, W. M. 

Robert D. Diggs, Jr., S. W. 

William A. Richardson. J. W. 

Wor. Bro. Edward C. Wyatt, Sec. 

Wor. Bro. Frederick S. Fairchild, 
Treas. 

Rev. Thomas S. Roy, Chaplain. 

Wor. Bro. Walter L. McCammon, 
Marshal. t 

William L. Graves, S. D. 

Robert E. Hills. J. D. 

George E. Rushforth. S. S. 

Thomas F. Lyons. J S. 

Harrison Hyslop. I. S. 

Marshal S. Bidwell, Organist. 

Elwin E. Snyder, Tyler. 

Following the installation exercises 
the retiring Master, Walter L. Mc- 
Camraon was presnted with a Past 
Masters jewel by Past Master F. S. 
Fairchild and with a Past Master’s 
apron by W. M. Charles H. Clark. 

Ivater there were refreshments and 
dancing in Temple hall. 


CITY HALL 


City Treasurer Francis Newhall is 
attending a convention of national fi- 
nancial officials this week at Balti- 
more. Md. 

City Engineer Edwin H. Rogers is 
in Minneapolis and St. Paul this week 
at the convention of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers. 



WEDDING GIFTS 
In 

Guaranteed Sliver Plate 
Casseroles — Baking Dishes 

*>41 SUMMER ST BOSTON « 


Tel. Milton 2176-W 

HERBERT F. WEST 

PAINTING, PAPERHANGING and INTERIOR DECORATING 

127 THACHER ST., MATTAPAN, MASS. 

First Clu*s Work Guaranteed. References 


BASLEY LUMBER COMPANY 

NO. 19 CRAFTS STREET, NEWTONVILLE, MASS. 

Will appreciate your business 
Spruce, Hardpine and Fir Timber Flooring, Sheathing 
Laths, Clapboard*, Shingle*, Siding 
Outside Moulding* and Finish 
Asphalt Slate Shingles, Roofing Paper, Etc. 
TELEPHONE NEWTON NORTH 3285 


NEWTON HIGH SCHOOLS 


(Continued from Page 1) 


Ellsworth O. Strong, *12 
William W. Walcott, '97 
Ralph O. West, '14 

The Eliot Memorial prizes were 
awarded by Supt. Wheeler, first to Miss 
Evelene M. Towle. ’20. for an essay on 
The honor pupils were: — 

Robert. E. Anderson, Jr. 

Ruth M. Relcher 
Lorraine C. Galllson 
Emma M. Wilder 
Helene C. Bixby 
Ruth P. Gordon 
Mary L. Olmstead 
Gertrude Swartz 
Muriel G. Esty 
Elinor S. Pedley 
Ella E. Ford 
Katherine W. Auryansen 
Dorothea Collins 
Laliah F. Curry 
Barbara Abbott 
William C. Fruo 

The other graduates were 


“Home Life in Colonial Days,” and 
second to Miss Gertrude Swartz, ’19, 
for an essay on “Colonial Travelling." 
These prizes consist of money from the 
income of the Eliot. Memorial Fund, 
$10 for the first and $4 for the second. 


Marshall G. Bolster 
Robert Whlttlnghtll 
Sibley A. Freeman 
Katherine T. Brophy 
Margaret K. Murphy 
Hope Parker 
Veto J. Altlerl 
Esther D. Smith 
Ruth E. Furlong 
Roger A. Lutz 
John M. Mahoney 
Marjorie K. Wentworth 
Wilson Palmer 
Eleanor L. Wales 
Helen J. Mumford 


Helen S. Allen 
Ruth M. Barber 
Aldyth L. Barrett 
Ruth W. Bartlett 
Eleanor P. Bright 
Marjorie I. BufTum 
Alice E. L. Calden 
Grace O. Chellis 
Margaret G. Coleman 
Mary A. Croker 
Ruth A. Crossman 
Grace F. Cunningham 
Virginia E. D. Curtis 
Dorothy Drew 
Dorothy A. Durgin 
Virginia P. Eddy 
Maxine D. Elliott 
Catherine M. Foye 
Marion W. Freethy 
Gertrude E. Gleason 
Anna E. Grantham 
Ethel G. Hahn , 

Dorothy W. Hawes 
Margaret D. Hicks 
Ruth Holley 
Katharine Holmes 
Margaret G. Jenkins 
Norma M. Keever 
Charlotte M. Kellar 
Artemis V. Kevorkian 
Hilda C. Lawrence 
Phyllis A. Lindley 
Dorothy R. Lockett 
Margaret L. Longfellow 


Florence E. Luther 
Edna E. MacGregor 
Louise M. Masters 
Mary E. McMahon 
Charline M. Mitchell 
Kathryn T. Park 
Mildred Peabody 
Florence E. Perry 
Gertrude Perry 
Margaret Rice 
Barbara F. Rich 
Isabelle Rose 
Gertrude G. Ross 
Gladys W. Ross 
Charlotte I. Rowe 
Helen N. Shelton 
Emily Talbot 
Helen L. Tougas 
Lyndall W. Weidner 
Lyman D. Babbitt 
Otto E. Bachmann 
Lester G. Blair 
Richard H. Blaisdell 
Joseph N. Brown, Jr. 
Clarence H. Chaisson 
Lucius C. Chandler 
Otis Clapp 
Donald L. Crawford 
Marcus F. Croker 
Paul H. Doherty 
Francis B. Donovan 
George E. Fort 
Roscoe H. Fuller 
Alan M. Groves 


Walter C. Dodge 
Benjamin P. Lane 
Lillian G. Lehmann 
Rodolphus K. Turner 
Marguerite T. Ludy 
Robert Richardson 
William H. Blandy 
Marie K. Ladle 
Ferry B. Allen 
Allard M. Valentine 
Alexander H. Brown 
Marguerite Jones 
Natalie C. W. True 
Stockbrldge C. Spence 
Raymond O. Ford 
John W. Guppy 

Mianese Gillian 
Robert A. Hawks 
Robert S. Hayes 
James Hewing, Jr. 
Walter R. Holmes 
Alan T. Hunt 
Emerson W. Hunt 
Arthur S. Kimball. Jr. 
Lendrum M. Knight 
Joel L. Leete 
Richard D. Leonard 
Ervin H. Lewis 
Howland C. Lord 1 
James W. Lowry 
George W. Mandell 
Walter F. McAvoy 
Robert De S. Mohor 
Henry S. Moore 
David J. Neagle 
Merrill C. Nutting 
George Owen, Jr. 
Stephen Palmer 
Henry S. Pinkham 
Wallace E. Richmond, Jr. 
Harold G. Scott 
Harold T. Stonemetz 
Thomas O. Sylvester 
Francis B. Wales 
Kenneth B. Walker 
James C. Walton 
Henry B. Watson, Jr. 
Worthing L. West 
Philip S. Wilder 
Lewis J. Young 


THE WALNUT STREET WIDENING 


The plans adopted by the aldermen 
for the widening of Walnut street at 
Newtonville square, call for no change 
on the east side of the street, south of 
the bridge and no change In the street 
line by the Associates’ block to Aus- 
tin street, altho a building line is es- 
tablished beginning at Austin street 
about 7 feet from the presnt line and 
coming out at the presnt street line, 
about 55 feet north of Austin street. 
South of Austin street, the street line 
is moved ten feet to the west with a 
building line, ten feet further. These 
lines run as far south as Highland 
avenue. 

On the north side of the bridge, the 
street is widened by taking a triangu- 
lar piece of land from the Claflin 
block on the east side of the street, 
being about 25 feet at Washington 
street and running to a point at Wal- 
nut terrace. 

On the west side, there is no change 
by the Dennison block but from this 
point northerly to Page road, there Is 
a widening to 60 feet, to parallel the 
easterly line, and with a further 
building line, ten feet further to the 
west. 


CENTRAL SQUARE THEATRE 


The big Nazlmova production, “The 
Red Lantern” which is to be shown 
at Gordon’s Cambridge Central Square 
Theatre Monday, Tuesday and Wed- 
nesday will shed new and Interesting 
light upon the traits and customs of 
the Chinese. 

Every racial habit or prejudice, 
every costume, every Incident depict- 
ed upon the screen will have the ab- 
solute stamp of historical and ethno- 
logical authenticity. 

As an extra added attraction, Harry 
Jolson, Al’s brother, one of the great- 
est comediennes on the stage, will ap- 
pear, together with four other big acts 
of vaudeville. 

The latest Mack Sennett Comedy, 
"Hearts and Flowers. “ will be shown. 

Harry Rodgers will give an organ ; 
recital. 

On Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 
there will be a new program of vau- 
deville and photoplays, featuring Eth- 
el Clayton in "Vicky Van." 


KANE— STILLMAN 


GARDEN PLAYTHINGS NEEDED 


The Newton Circle and Welfare Bu- 
reau are in need of a baby carriage, 
blankets, a wooden garden awing, a 
see saw, and a variety of outdoor toys, 
Buch as little carts, balls, etc. Will 
any one able to contribute such ar- 
ticles kindly communicate with Miss 
Helen F. Hull, 29 Ivanhoe street, N. 
N. 1214-M. 


Miss Alice C. Stillman of 14 Avon 
place. Newton, was married on Mon- 
day night at the Church of Our Lady. 
Newton, to William E. Kane of Liver- 
more Falls. Me. Miss Mary A. Burns 
of Newton was the maid of honor and ! 
Charles J. Kane, brother of the bride- 
groom was the best man. There were 
four flower girls. Gladys Cloutier of 
Maine. Imelda Hutchinson of New j 
Hampshire, Florence Simpson of 
Wakefield, and Alice Wilins of New- ; 
ton. Mr. and Mrs. Kane will live on 
Langley road. Brighton. 


NEWTON 25 YEARS AGO 

From the Newton Graphic of 
June 15, ISO* 

Chief of Fire Department Henry L. 
Bixby killed by collision with a post 
on Washington street, Newtonville, 
while answering an alarm of fire. 

Death of Mr. Richard Carsley of 
Newton. 

Rev. Charles F. Rice, D.D., preaches 
baccalaureate sermon, and Mrs. Mary 
A . Livermore the speaker of the day 
at Lasell Commencement. 

Annual meeting of Newton Wom- 
en’s Suffrage League elects Mr. Ed- 
win F. Kimball presdent. 

Wedding of Miss Mary Dyer and Mr. 
Henry D. Young at Auhurndale. 

Corner stone laid for the Central 
Congregational Church In Newton- 
ville. 

Annual June drill of the Newton 
High School battalion, with individual 
prizes won by Corp. Harold Burdon 
and Sergt. Arthur W. Hollis with hon- 
orable mention to Sergt. -Major H. L. 
Tilton. Sergt. Hammond and Priv. 
Hune. 

Silver wedding anniversary ob- 
served by Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Arming- 
ton of Parker street. Newton Centre. 


AWCMDBI&INSIMNCE 

AT COST 
.. - MujPaij Wore • 

Massachusetts Mutual Auto Ins. Ca 
Automobile Mutual Liability Ins. Ca 
40 Central Street, Boston 


Technical High 


The Technical High School orches- 
tra was a most enjoyable feature of 
the program, giving the opening march 
and one other selection during the eve- 
ning. Music was also rendered by a 
trio consisting of Muriel McGown, 
cello, Edna Tuttle, and Inez Cormack, 
piano. 

Francis J. White, president of the 
class of 1918 presented a memorial to 
the school for three of its members 
who had died since the graduation of a 
year ago. The gift was a bookcase 
with 250 volumes for the school li- 
brary. 

Fred P. Manter, the president of the 
class of 1919 presented the school with 
The honor pupils were: — 


the class gifts which included a book- 
case for the library, a cabinet for pic- 
tures and 13 pictures for decorating 
the school rooms. They were accepted 
by Mr. Irving O. Palmer, master of 
the school. 

The prizes awarded by the school 
faculty were presented by Mr. Maynard 
Maxim, head of the Commercial de- 
partment to George L. Sanderson and 
Irene P. Manter. These prizes are 
given to the pupils who maintain the 
highest average for the four years of 
school and consist of books. 

The address to the graduating class 
was given by Dr. Payson Smith. Com- 
missioner of Education for the Com- 
monwealth and the diplomas were pre- 
sented by Mayor Edwin O. Childs. 


Irene M. Cowley 
George L. Sanderson 
Florence M. Orrill 
Dorothy M. Hill 
Herbert W. Kestle 
Gordon G. Kitchin 


Margery J. Burnham 
Muriel McGown 
Josephine Colarullo 
Ebba C. Carlson 
Gladys M. Poor 
Doris R. Fort6 


The other graduates were: — 


Vera B. Allen 
Marion A. Armstrong 
Mary F. Ban non 
Eleanor M. Barry 
Esther M. Barry 
Margaret H. Barry 
Mary E. Bennett 
Katheryn V. Boughan 
Gladys M. Boyd 
Kathleen F. Boyle 
Annie M. Bradbury 
Gertrude Bradley 
Helen E. Brooks 
Helen Cannon 
Ida F. Carter 
Eleanor A. Coleman 
Mildred B. Crosby 
Mary J. Dalton 
Helena F. Davis 
Ruth H. Farrington 
Dora B. Feola 
Grace Finn 
Grace L. Franklin 
Isabel M. Gaw 
Kathryn A. Gibbons 
Margaret I. Giles 
Sadie Goldrick 


Gertrude A. Herlihy 
Gladys L. Holland 
Alice R. Hooley 
Marion C. King 
Hazel H. Lupien 
Josephine W. Lupien 
Alice H. MacLaughliu 
Agnes E. Martin 
Irene C. McAleer 
Alice L. McBride 
Marion F. McKeon 
Anna E. Murphy 
Agnes G. O’Donnell 
Marion F. O Halloran 
Norene Parkhurst 
Edith Patchett 
Jessie Pettigrew 
Mary I. Phair 
Elizabeth M. Ritcey 
Merle E. Scribner 
Mary C. Shea 
Gertrude M. Sheridan 
Amy Shriberg 
Mary J. Silverman 
Esther S. Smith 
Ruth H. Stickney 
Dorothy Titus 


Mildred C. Jay 
Ruth E. Jenkins 
Ix)uis Lacroix 
Bertha Johnson 
Thomas F. Donnelly 
Mary M. Whalen 

Marjorie Titus 
Edith Weaver 
Gladys E. Weeks 
Mark L. Ball 
Rudolph E. Eller 
James T. Fennelly 
Edward W. Fisher 
Edward T. Flanagan 
Thomas M. Foristall 
Thomas F. Green 
Edward F. Harrington 
Henry E. Hawkins 
John Horgan 
Walter I. Knudsen 
Fred P. Manter 
William E. McGrath 
William L. Newcombe 
Ralph P. Petrillo 
Elmer T. Priest 
Edward A. Ryall 
Fred L. Sawyer 
Leon H. Tompkins 
James F. Walsh 
Herbert G. Wiley 
Harold E. Wilson 
Irving W. Wiswall 


Vocational High 


Dr. Payson Smith, the Commis- 
sioner of Education also made the ad- 
dress to the graduating class of this 
school. A feature of the program was 
the report of the work of the school in 
the war, Jennie M. Cooper speaking 
for the Junior Red Cross, Harriette 
The honor pupils were: — 

Jennie M. Cooper Charles A. Gleason 

William R. Crump, Jr. Batholomew J. Gorman 
Michael J. Durkin Harriette Hunting 

The other graduates were: — 

Doris Carson Harold W. Douglas 

James R. Church John J. Healion 

Elizabeth E. Cooper Helen R. Kellar 

Harriet P. Cone George E. Kerivan 


Hunting for the work of the House- 
hold Arts Department, and a paper on 
War time work of the Men and Boys 
by Charles A. Gleason being read by 
William R. Crump. Jr. The class gift 
of a victrola was presented by Joseph 
E. Roy, president of the senior class. 
Mayor Childs presnted the diplomas 
in his usual felicitous manner. 


Joseph E. Roy 
Rachel A. Seaward 
William A. Van Buskirk 

Jennie E. Morrill 
Mary E. Sullivan 
Anthony J. Vahey 
George F. Weir 


PIC,K TEMPORARY OFFICERS 
(Continued from Page 1) 


around him until the tellers could 
count. There was considerable con- 
fusion as the men divided and wheu 
the friends of Messrs. Mahoney and 
Sheridan and Capt. Cormerais found 
that the bulk of the vote was going 
either to Capt. Edmunds or Capt. 
Weeks, there was a constant shifting, 
so that the tellers were unable to make 
the count. The chairman finally gave 
them three minutes to locate them- 
selves and then there was an attempt 
to have the vote taken by ballot, which 
wus ruled out of order. In the final 
division, Cupt. Edmunds received 101 
votes and Capt. Weeks 93. The other 
officers elected were William Cahill, 
vice commander, Fr. William J. Far- 
rell, chaplain, Harry W. Strandquist, 
adjutant, and Thomas F. Hickey, fi- 
nance officer. 

These officers are hut temporary, 
holding otflee only until a charter is re- 
ceived and they were instructed to ap- 
point a nominating committee of 5 
who were to report ut u subsequent 
meeting the names of not less than 
two candidates for each office. A con- 
stitution and by luws will also be pre- 


pared and submitted at the next i 
ing. which it is expected will 
in the near future. 

REAL ESTATE 


Edmunds and Byfield report the 
sale of 20 acres of land situated at 
the corner of Mill and Centre streets. 
Newton, for the Colby Realty Corpora- 
tion, to George F. Sehrafft of Newton, 
who will erect a house for his own 
occupancy. This is one of the largest 
sales of vacant land that has tuken 
place in Newton for some yours. 

Messrs. McKenney & Waterbury Co. 
181 Franklin street, corner Congress. 
Boston, Mass., are showing the latest 
and up-to-dute Electric, Gas and Oil 
Lighting Fixtures for homes and pub- 
lic buildings to he found in this coun- 
try. All lighted to show the desired 
effects. 

SUMMER OUTING 


The summer outing of the Newton 
Board of Trade will bo held ut Bass 
Point, Nuhunt. next WedneBduy after- 
noon und evening, the trip being made 
by uutomobiles. There will be an in- 
teresting program of sports, both in- 
door and out door, including a bun- 
quet. 


GIFTS U at STO WELL’S 





HAIR ORNAMENTS 
Casque combs, Jet combs, 
Barrettes, new Spanish-Ef- 
fect back combs and fancy 
hair pins. 

Prices $1.00 to $12.00 


TRAVELLING CLOCKS 
A new model in a radium dial fold- 
ing clock. The luminous dial, with its 
figures and hands covered with this 
wonderful compound, enables one to 
easily read the time in absolute dark- 
ness. Prices $10.00 to $80.00. Gun 
Metal Radium dial alarm watches 
$7.50. 


SILVER PITCHER 

This Sterling silver pitcher 
makes an unusual gift which 
one likes to give or receive. 

Price $42.00 and up 





PICKARD CHINA 

Exquisitely hand painted in exclusive 
decorations. The coffee set shown, three 
pieces. Price $25.00. 



CUT CRYSTAL BASKET 
The purity of the cut 
crystal glass, the delicate 
artistic cuttings, of the floral 
patterns make them most 
desirable gifts at any time. 

Prices $1.25 to $24.00 




GOLD CUFF LINKS 
We have a remark- 
able variety of new de- 
signs. engine turned 
and brocade finish. 
Gold with enamel deco- 
ration is seen in many 
new patterns. Prices in 
14 Kt. gold 

$4.50 to $235.00 



CANTEEN BOXES 

Great variety of shapes 
and leathers. 

Prices $5.00 to $20.00 



STERLING SILVER 
VASES 

Many new designs in 
vases are constantly 
being added to our dis- 
play. 

Prices $3.25 to $135.00 



SILVER DEPOSIT GLASS 
Our stock includes many unique 
ideas such as pitchers, sugars and 
creams, cracker and cheese dishes, 
cheese and lemon plates with 
servers, Betty tea sets, coffee sets 
of Lenox china heavily deposited. 

Price' $3.00 to $50.00 


DOOR STOP AND BANK 
This Fido door stop and 
bank is a very popular and 
useful article. Fido will hold 
your door and also your 
pennies. Price $2.00 


14 KT. GOLD PENCIL 

This is an extra heavy 14 Kt. gold pencil with engine turned 
design Prices from $7.00 to $35.00 


STERLING SILVER SETS 


Attractive and desirable for wedding gifts and the home, are shown in our Silver 
Room, easily accessible on the street floor. Here also may be seen Coffee Sets, 
Trays, Platters. Centre Pieces, Vases and many other useful Silver articles. 





2-4 Winter Street, Boston 

Jewelers for 98 Years 


Buy U. S. Govt. W. S. S. 




THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIHAT, JDNE 20, 1910. 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 

B»t*re 4 M the rort-offlo. at BowU 
Nu*.. ** se cond -cto— metier. 

IMIN Ymr. Simla Copley • Oaala 

By Mall. Postage Free. 

All money eent at aender’e rlak. 

Check* and money order* should be made 
payable to 


Notice* of all entertainment* to which 
an admission fee Is charged must be paid 
for at regular advertising rate*. 15 cent* 
ppr printed line In general reading matter. 
«r 16 cents per printed line, under Tillage 
n endings. 


The editor will be glad to print all com 
■manlcatlons, accompanied by the name of 
writer bearing on any matter of pjbllc 
interest, except article* or letters advocat- 
ing or opposing the nomination or election 
,f candidates for political ofnce. which will 

, ><» tr«-iitc»l ns — — 

GRAPHIC PDBUSHLNU CO. 

J. C. Brimbleeom, Trews. 


EDITORIAL 


The city government should be com- 
mended for its action in widening Wal- 
nut street at Newtonville square-tt 
should have been done years ago— but 
at the same time, there is a serious 
question whether a more comprehen- 
sive plan, such as was advocated b> 
Alderman Blake, should not have been 
adopted. With the new building of the 

new °pUo" SS: f" Met J 

£ 

the drug store corner, there seG “ 9 
cood ground for criticizing the im- 
provement as not going far en ® u f£; 
At the same time, the widening at the 
Claflin block corner to 7o feet will un 

There is one serious omission in the 
matter and that is in relation to some 
understanding with the abuttors ln r^ 
ward to the damages caused by the 
faking. Usually such matters have 
been thorolv thrashed out before ac- 
uon is taken by the city sovernment 
We understand that this is n 
case in the present instance and there 
is a possibility that the damages ma> 
amount to an excessive figure. 

Woman suffrage now seems to ibe a 
nv r possibility and from the action 
of the State Senate yesterday, even 
conservative Massachusetts, seems to 
be readv to fall in line with the rest 
of the country in bringing this about. 
While we do not believe that the Leg- 
islature represents the sentiment o 
the state, we are glad that in this re 
spect. at least, the legislature is more 
progressive than its constituents. 

— ° — . 

The strong local protest against the 
location of an incinerator near the 
freight vard on Newtonville avenue 
has caused the abandonment of the 
project by its advocates, and is prob- 
ably a criterion which will be followed 
when other locations are suggested. 
It will therefor follow, that Newton 
will never have an incinerator. 

The answer of the members of the 
Legislature to Representative Under- 
hill’s statement that some of them 
were not worth “two cents” is the pas- 
sage of the bill to increase all their 
salaries from $1000 to $1500 and para- 
doxical as it seems. Mr. Underhill’s 
statement is thereby vindicated. 

Representative Bernard Early was 
largelv instrumental in obtaining an 
appropriation of $45,000 from the Leg- 
islature for the completion of the No- 
nantum road boulevard, now' ending in 
Charlesbank road, along the hanks of 
the river to the junction of Maple and 
Jefferson streets. 

— o — 

Mayor Childs did the right and prop- 
er thing in disapproving the location 
of a gasolene station in Nonantum 
square and the aldermen recognized 
the stuation w’hen they voted to sus- 
tain the veto. 


OPEN MEETING 


An open meeting will he held by 
Newton City Employees’ Local No. 175. 
in Warner Hall, corner of Elmwood 
and Centre streets, Newton. Friday 
evening. June 20. at 8.15 o’clock. 

All men employed in any City De 
partment are invited to attend. Prom- 
inent speakers have been invited. 


Newton Centre 

— Mr. and Mrs. William Roberts of 
Brockton have moved to Cypress 
street. 

— Miss Martha Brooks of Lake ave- 
nue has gone to her summer home at 
Brant Rock. 

— Miss Josephine Hartridge of Ox- 
ford road has gone to Woods Hole for 
a few days’ trip. 

— Mr. Charles (’. Elw'ell of Centre 
street has gone to Marblehead for a 
week’s vacation. 

— Mr. Samuel Decatur of Pleasant 
street is spending a few' days with 
friends at Webster. 

-Miss Jennie Thompson of Elgin 
street is spending a few days with 
friends in Worcester. 

Miss Mary L. ltaymoftd of this 
village received the degree of A. M. 
thiB week at Radcliffe. 

— Mr. George Jackson of Hammond 
street lias gone to the Weirs. N. H., 
for a fortnight’s vacation. 

— Mr. Abner Foster of Institution 
avenue is spending a few days with 
friends at Brunswick, Me. 

— Miss Eminu Wilkins of Grant ave- 
nue lias gone to Marblehead where 
she will spend the summer. 

— Mr. Hurold Johnson of Gibbs 
street left last Tuesday for Pember- 
ton, where he will stay for u month. 

—Mr. Asa D. Cameron of Pelham 
street 1 b spending the rest of the 
month with friends at Wuterville, Me. 

Miss Kathryn Golding who has 
been ill at her home on Heucon street 
for the past few days is able to he 
out. 

— Rev. Joseph C. Robbins of Oak- 
wood terrace received the honorary 
degree of D. D. this week from Brown 
University. 


Newton Centre 

— Mr. Robert A. Carlton has taken n 
house on West bourne rond. 

— Mr. Carl O. Zerrhnn has lensed the 
house at 7 l*ee road. Chestnut Hill. 

— Rev. and Mrs. Edward M. Noyes 
arc to spend the summer at West Har- 
wich. Mass. 

— Miss Dorothy Spenre graduated 
this week from Smith college with the 
degree of A.B. 

-The Rev. Edward T. Sullivan is to 
preach at St. Paul’s Cathedral. Boston, 
during tne summer. 

— Miss Margaret C. Belcher has just 
graduated from Wellesley college with 
the degree of bachelor of arts. 

—Mr. Endicott P. Saltonstall of 
Chestnut hill was one of the aids at 
Harvard Commencement this week. 

— The automobile of Major John C. 
DeMille was stolen from the rear of 
Trinity Church last Sunday morning. 

Mr. Louis K. Liggett of Chestnut 
hill is president of the recently organ- 
ized Republican League of Massachu- 
setts. 

— Mr. F. E. Fish of Bowen street is 
at his home after spending the past 
week at his summer home in North 
Weymouth. 

— The Rev. Dr. Emory W. Hunt of 
the Baptist Church has gone to Buck- 
nell University. Louisburg, Pa., for the 
inauguration. 

-Mr. Peter Say ward who has been 
spending the past few days in Win- 
throp has returned to his home on 
Paul street. 

— Miss Sarah C. Carter who has 
been spending the past week at Fal- 
mouth has returned to her home on 
Cedar street. 

— Mr. Thomas A. Tilton who is still 
in the service, was given the degree 
of bachelor of arts this week by Am- 
herst College. 

— Miss Lucy D. Shaw who has been 
spending the past week in Providence, 
R. I.. has returned to her home on 
I-angley road. 

— Mr. Willis W. Dunbar of Chase 
street is seriously ill at the Newton 
Hospital, where he has recently been 
operated upon. 

-Rev. Oscar B. Hawes and family 
go to Hancock Point. Maine, for the 
summer. The church will be closed 
until September. 

— Alderman and Mrs. W. L. Allen of 
Kingsbury road. Chestnut Hill, are 
spending the summer at Camp Spruce. 
Rangeley, Maine. 

— ‘Miss Elsie Whittaker who has 
been spending the past w'eek at Ells- 
worth. Me., has returned to her home 
on Homer street. 

-Mr. William Skelton who has been 
spending the holidays at his camp at 
North Weymouth has returned to his 
home on Bowen street. 

— Mr. John Cooke who has been 
with the American forces in France 
for several months has returned to 
his home on Sumner street. 

-Mr. Waldron H. Rand. Jr., having 
qualified, has been authorized to as- 
sume at once his duties as a major, 
11th Regiment, State Guard. 

— The engagement is announced of 
Miss Marie Ross, the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Hugh E. Ross of Chestnut 
hill and Lieut. Grover Klein, U. S. X. 

-Box 76 was rung about midnight 
Saturday for a fire in an automobile 
owned by Thomas J. McCormack of 
Allston, .while on the Centre street 
bridge. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George Bramwell 
Baker of Chestnut hill have announced 
the engagement of their daughter, 
Virginia, to Mr. David B. Arnold of 
Brookline. 

-Among the graduates this week 
from Simmons College were Miss Cath- 
erine Tyler from the school of general 
science, and Miss Helen M. Burgess 
from the school of library science. 

— Thursday afternoon at 1.30 the 
ladies of the First church will meet at 
the church to finish up the work for 
the Armenian Relief. All interested 
in this good work are cordially invited 
to attend. 

— The block of seven one-story 
stores, corner of Beacon and Sumner 
streets, has been sold to Harry R. Cum- 
mings. The parcel has a total assessed 
value of $27,500, there being 5000 sq. 
ft. of land. 

— The Baptist, Congregational, and 
Methodist Churches are to unite for 
nine weeks during the summer, the 
Baptist Church taking the first 
three weeks, the Congregational church 
the next three weeks, and the Method- 
ist church the last three weeks. 

— Saturday evening at Bray Hall 
there will be given a short play. “The 
Hoodoo”, followed by music by the 
Tech orchestra and dancing. The play 
is under the direction of Miss Marion 
Hubbard who gave a similar play last 
year for the benefit of the Red Cross. 
This time the proceeds are to be given 
to the Newton Hospital. 

— Messrs. Walter L. Jones and Way- 
land P". Vaughn of this village gradu- 
ated last week from Phillips Andover 
Academy, Vaughn winning honors in 
French, English History and Physics, 
and Jones winning honors in English, 
solid geometry and trigonometry. 
Ixjuis H. Fitch. Jr., was awarded the 
Converse prize for excellence in math- 
ematics. 

— Mrs. Clara D. Shaw, the widow of 
the late Janies C. Shaw, died at the 
resdence of her daughter, Mrs. Bol- 
and A. Thayer on Homer street lust 
Sunday morning, after a long illness. 
Mrs. Shaw was 58 years of age. Fun- 
eral services were held at (he Thayer 
home on Sunday afternoon, in charge 
of Rev. E. T. Sullivan and the inter- 
ment was on Wednesday at Macon, 
Ga. 

— The Methodist Church is putting 
in a new organ. In the mean time 
services are held In the chapel. There 
will he two more services here, then 
the church will unite with the Baptist 
and Congregational churches for the 
‘ummer. The Rev. James E. Wagner 
is making a tour of the Methodist 
Theological Schools during the Hum- 
mer He will give courses of lectures 
at these schools. He is ut present in 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

Mrs. Catherine Mcl^erie, the wife 
of Mr. David Mcl^erle, died lust Sun- 
day at her home on Irving street, af- 
ter a long illness, ut the age of 63 
veers. Mrs. McLerie is survived by 
her hu iband . and t wo sons, < ;• mi 
who is in the English army, and Sam- 
uel, a resident of Roslindule. Funer- 
al services were held at the house on 
Wednesday, Rev. Dr. E. M. Noyes of- 
ficiating and the interment wus in the 
Newton Cemetery. 


GERANIUM nnd BEDDING PLANTS 
of All Kinds at 

NEWTON ROSE CONSERVATORIES 
R. C. Brldgham, Prop. 

321) Newtonville Avenue 
Newtonville 

Telephone Newton North 104 


WALNUT STREET WIDENED 

(Continued from Page 1) 


GOOD GOVERNMENT CLUB MEETS 

At a public meeting held in Newton, 
Mass., under the auspices of the Good 
Government Club of Auburndale, the 
following resolutions were unani- 
mously adopted: 

RESOLVED: That this meeting en- 
dorse the position taken by His Ex- 
cellency the Governor and by the 
Senator and Represntatives from New- 
ton with reference to the hill for the 
increase of legislative salaries. 

RESOLVED: That a copy of this 
resolution be sent to the Governor 
nnd to said Senator and Representa- 
tives. 

Also — 

RESOLVED: That it is the sense 
of this meeting that it will he for the 
best interests of the United States 
and of the world at large that the 
treaty of peace with Germany he rati- 
fied by the Senate of the United States 
without delay and without condition, 
reservation or qualification with ref- 
erence to the League of Nations as 
comprised in Part I of the present 
draft of said treaty, provided that said 
treaty is in other respects reasonably 
satisfactory. 

RESOLVED FURTHER: That a 
copy of these resolutions be sent by 
the Secretary of the Good Government 
Club of Auburndale to both Senators 
from this Commonwealth. 

Also — 

WHEREAS, a public meeting held 
under the auspices of the Good Gov- 
ernment Club of Auburndale regards 
the censure of Charles L. Underhill 
of Somerville by the House of Repre- 
sensativfs as a matter of staje im- 
portance. and 

WHEREAS, it recalls his high eul- 
ogy of the legislature in a speech in 
the constitutional convention showing 
his opinion of the legislature as a 
whole; it believes he rendered the 
state valuable service in calling at- 
tention to the exceptional cases of un- 
worthiness which are liable to occur 
in any legislature, thereby inciting 
every district to elect only the best 
men available. It is sure that there 
was no malice in the remarks which 
caused the censure. It has warm ad- 
miration for the courage, fidelity and 
truth with which he stood his ground 
through a most trying ordeal in the 
House 

Now. therefore, it sends to Mr. Un- 
derhill its appreciation and congratu- 
lations. It expresses respectfully to 
the House its regret at *its vote of 
censure and hereby petitions that it 
reverse its action. 

VOTED, that copies of the above be 
sent severally to Mr. Underhill and to 
the House of Represntatives. 


REMARKABLE GOLF 


Possibly a world’s record, of its 
kind, was made at the Brae-Burn 
Country Club Tuesday, when four 
golfers playing as one group all put 
their tee shots on the sixth green and 
all holed their putts for 2s. Those 
who figured in this remarkable 
achievement were Ray Gorton. A. A. 
Highlands, C. W. Noyes, and Ixmis 
Tellier. 

The sixth hole on the West Newton 
course is at all times a possible 2. but 
equally a possible 5, or worse. It is 
an island green, generally speaking, 
guarded in front and along the right 
by a brook and in back and to the left 
by bunkers. 

The hole measures only 150 yards, 
hut the tee is on a high elevation, and 
the distance is decidedly deceptive, 
hence any four golfers who, playing 
as a group, can all land their tee shots 
on the green have done something a 
bit out of the ordinary to start with. 
Not only did the above-named four 
all get their tee shots home, hut they 
were all within a radius Qf perhaps 
fifteen feet from the cup. 

Ray Gorton's ball was farthest 
away, and he started the extraordi- 
nary performance by running the ball 
in for a 2. Tellier putted next, with 
a speed that might have taken the hall 
twice the necessary distance, the Brae- 
Burn professional having lost his put- 
ting stroke for the time being. But 
his hall hit the hack of the cup hard, 
kicked up a few inches and dropped 
into the cup. Andy Highlands trick- 
led his 10-footer in for a deuce and 
then all hands stood there and rooted 
for Charlie Noyes to follow suit. They 
told him he just had to get his 8- 
footer, and he did. in no uncertain 
manner, either. All four promptly did 
an Indian war dance, with the accom- 
panying warhoop. 


Lower Falls 

— The Methodist Church will be open 
during the summer. The Rev. A. J. 
Straight will preach except during his 
vacation, when the Church will have 
supplies to be uijjnounced later. 

— Mrs. Bessie Orman of Everett was 
struck by an automobile operated by 
George Barker of Arlington last Tues- 
day morning on Concord street, near 
Huger path and was taken to the 
Newton Hospital in the police ambu- 
lance. 


for a multiple garage on Centre place, 
and it was recommitted, with the re- 
sult that the committee later reported 
leave to withdraw. The majority re- 
port of the License committee favoring 
a multiple gnrnge for W. W. Trow- 
bridge ofT Chestnut street was also re- 
committed nnd later when again favor- 
ably reported with Alderman Hollis 
dissenting, was refused by a vote of 
8 in favor to 10 opposed. 

Favorable action was taken on ap- 
propriations of $1500 for tables nnd 
seats in the lunch rooms at the Classi- 
cal and Technical High School.? and 
fdr $(J5 to settle claim of Arthur P. 
Porter. 

Alderman Angler called attention to 
an apparent looseness in the ordinance 
whereby a man might obtain a permit 
for a building for storage purpose and 
later turn It into a garage. Alderman 
Nichols said that tills was true in a 
snse as the present ordinances only 
Included new buildings or alterations 
in present buildings for use as garages. 
He stated that a man might apply for 
a permit to build "multiple hen- 
houses” and later use these buildings 
for garage purposes. Later in the eve- 
ning the ordinance hearing on this 
matter was amended so as to cover 
this point. Ordinances were also 
passed amending the Building Code in 
regard to temporary buildings and in 
one or two other minor respects. In 
passing the ordinance relative to gar- 
ages. Alderman Whidden and Aider- 
man Angier had an interesting tilt in 
regard *to the personalities involved in 
a case in point, now before the board 
for action. 

There was a long recess for commit- 
tee meetings, largely to settle the im 
portant matter of widening of Walnut 
street In Newtonville. • This was later 
reported from the Finance committee 
after consultation with the Public 
Works committee, in favor of a widen 
ing of some 60 feet, instead of 75 as 
first proposed, and making a taking 
only on the Claflin Block side, where 
any buildings exist. There is also a 
building line to allow a future widen 
ing to 70 feet. Alderman Blake, who 
has had this matter in particular 
charge made a vigorous protest against 
this change in plan, saying that it fell 
far short of meeting the situation, will 
make several kinks in the street line, 
the most serious being that on the 
north side of Washington street where 
the new Orr building on Walnut street, 
in the rear of Dennison block would 
have a bad angY and could not he seen 
from Washington street. He declared 
that this plan would leave a scar and 
that it would always cause a question 
as to why this widening was not done 
right. Its only merit he said was that 
of saving a few thousand dollars. 

President Harriman took the floor to 
say that the 75 feet widening Injured 
three business blocks, the new plan, 
but one. He stated that traffic runs in 
10 feet units and 60 feet with two ten 
feet sidewalks would allow four lines 
of traffic at one time. 40 feet for this 
use he said was wider than any other 
street in Newton, except at squares, 
and instanced Federal street in Boston, 
which is only 40 feet between curbs. 
The change would save $50,000 in ex- 
pense and expert authority had said 
that 60 feet would be ample width for 
the next 25 or 50- years and that a 70 
feet building line will enable the future 
to widen when necessary. Alderman 
Blake said that 60 feet was only suit- 
able for residential districts and 
claimed that the saving by the new 
plan would he but $30,000. The orders 
were then passed with AldermanBlake 
voting alone in opposition. 

Orders were passed for an issue of 
$90,000 in sewer bonds, for the State 
Primary on Sept. 24. for polling places 
for the State Primary and for pay of 
the election officers. Hearings were or- 
dered on Sept. 8, for laying out of 
Saxon terrace, for widening of Dudley 
road and for taking land on Elliot 
street for municipal purposes. 

The Public Works committee were 
requested to consider the advisability 
of changing the rate of assessments for 


ROSE PLANTS and PANSY PLANTS 
nt 

NEWTON ROSE CONSERVATORIES 
R. C. Bridghnm, Prop. 

329 Newtonville Avenue 
Newtonville 

Telephone Newton North 404 


Upper Falls 


— Mr. Jack Lucas of Keefe avenue 
spent the past week at Hudson, Maas 

— A Sundny School picnic of the 
Baptist Church, Brookline, was held 
at Hemlock Gorge June 17. 

—Mrs. Hale, matron of the Institute, 
and Miss Daisy Lyon, have left for a 
short visit at Peaks’ rsland, Maine. 

— A welcome home supper was given 
to Master Thomas Scavoni by his 
many frlnds at his sisters home on El- 
liot terrace last Saturday night. 

— Among the graduates this year 
from Wellesley college with the de- 
gree of bachelor of arts are Miss Mad- 
eline C. Everett and Miss Emily L. 
Thompson. 

— The baseball game between the 
Newton Upper Falls Athletic Associa- 
tion and Malden which w r as to take 
place on the holiday, was postponed 
on account of inclement weather. 

— A union picnic, consisting of mem- 
bers of the Methodist Church of New- 
ton Highlands and the Methodist and 
Baptist Churches of this village, will 
be held Saturday at Norumbega. 

—The Italian Republican Club held 
open house Tuesday, and the Italians 
w'ho served in the war were the spe- 
cial guests of the club. Refreshments 
w'ere served and a general good time 
was given these service men. 

— The reception and sale held at the 
Stone Institute last Saturday proved 
a great success, both financially and 
socially. The many pretty and useful 
articles made by the residents of the 
Home were the admiration of all the 
onlookers. 

—A big day is planned in this vil- 
lage for Saturday, June 21, by the 
members of the Welcome Home Fund. 
A banquet will be held, at the Lincoln 
Hall at 8.30, follow'ed by dancing until 

12. A hall game is scheduled for the 
afternoon, and a baud concert will be 
held while refreshments are served. 

— The interior of the Saco-Lowell 
shops which were filmed a few months 
ago, were shown at the Auditorium on 
Wednesday evening.- On account of 
the limited space of the theatre, ar- 
rangements have been made to have 
the film shown three other nights, so 
that all may have a chance to see it. 


sewers, and the board at 12.30 A. 
adjourned until Sept. 8th. 


M. 


Waban 


— The Churches in Waban will he 
closed during the summer. 

—Mr. Frank E. Wing and family of 
Chestnut street are summering at Al- 
lerton. 

— Mr. Edward Becker and family of 
Waban avenue are ut their summer 
home at Scituate. 

— Mr. George Roberts and family of 
Pine Ridge road are at Chatham for 
the summer months. 

— Mr. Reginald Smith and family of 
Ashmont road are at North Scituatef 
for a three months’ stay. 

—Mr. Sharlton Whitaker and fam- 
ily of Woodward street will spend tty 
summer months at Scituate. 

— Mr. Chas. A. Andrews is a mem- 
ber of the executive committee of the 
recently organized Republican League 
of Massachusetts. 

— Among the graduates from 
Wellesley college this year with the 
degree of bachelor of arts was Miss 
Gertrude Peabody of Wuhan avenue. 

—At the Union Church next Sunday 
morning there will be both the com- 
munion and baptismal services. The 
Union Church will close for the sum- 
mer with the last Sunday of June — 
June 29th. 


A,, 4 _ ( Newton North 1962 

AUtO Uelivery Telephone* \ Newton North 149 


Brookline 3199 


Main Offici, Watertown 


THOMAS JOSEPH McCUE 

Construction and 
IVIotor Trucking Contractor 

WHOLESALE COAL RETAIL 


264 North Beacon St„ 


Watertown, Mass. 


The Country Day School 

Though the Country Day School has 
lost several of its teachers this year. 
It is fortunate in having three very 
able men join them for the coming 
year. 

The list of honor awards for the 
final half-term of the year has just 
been announced. “Honors” were 
awarded to twelve hoys who have se- 
cured a mark of at least 80 per cent 
in every subject, while thirty-nine boys 
were awarded "honorable mention” for 
attaining a general average of 80 per 
cent or better. The awards are as fol- 
lows: 

Honors — Class 1. Peter B. Ferguson; 
class 2, Duncan Mann; class 4. Willard 
Bridges, Jr., Lawrence O. Pratt; class 

5. William L. Brewster, Philip Fowler, 
Rudge Nichols, William E. Soule; class 

6, David L. Garrison. Arthur W. Rich- 
ardson, Chandler Robbins; class 8, 
Wells Wilbor. 

Honorable mention — Class 1, Charles 

K. Cummings, Jr.; class 2, Philip C. 
Aspinwall, Vinthrop S. Clapp, William 

L. Garrison, 3rd, Henry N. Pratt; class 
3. J. Kenly Bacon. Richard W. Dwight. 
John D. Houghton. William T. Reid, 
W. Douglass Richmond. Arthur L. 
Spring, Robert E. Sunmer, W. Hunt- 
ington Thompson; class 4, Henry G. 
Bradlee, Jr., John W. Brewster, Ernest 
L. Hill: class 5, John Harwood. Henry 
Ware, Jr.; class 6. Bailey Aldrich, 
John J. Chickering, Jr., Allen V. Ellis, 
E. Lovett Garceau. James M. Hallowell, 
Jr„ Joseph B. Hartwell, Reed Har- 
wood, A. Spaulding Howe. Jr., Edward 
S. Nealley, Jr., Edward P. White, Bar- 
rett Williams; class 7, George W. 
Brewster. Rupert Maclaurin. Lovett 
Morse, Pfill ip Nichols, Jr., H. Harrison 
Proctor, Daniel A. Sullivan, Jr., Rich- 
ard W. Thayer; class 8, James T. 
Baldwin. Reginald H. Johnson, Jr., Ab- 
bot Peterson, Jr. 


OWN YOUR OWN HOME 

BUILD NOW AND SAVE MONEY 

By Using; Swift-McNutt Company’s 
Reclaimed Building Material 

Splendid Opportunity to Purchase tor Immediate 
Construction Work 

All of tlio thoroughly *co*on«>d I'm m line Stork and other material* now In the 
TEMPORARY FRAME CANTONMENT BUILDINGS we are tearing down on the 
around* of the WENTWORTH INSTITUTE, corner Huntington Avenue, l’urker 
and Huggl«‘* Street*, Heston. (Thene structure* were Inillt for the U. S. Government 
les* than a year and one half hko.) This stork consist* of: 

2x0, from 14' to 1(1' long Spruce Plank, pinned four Hide*; 2xll, from ,‘tO' long and 
up Hard Pine Plank, planed four Hide*; 2x4, 4x4 Studding; 4x(l, flxfl, (IxH Timber; 
Mntehrd Hprure Hoard*, planed one *lde; Square Edge Spruce Hoard*, both rough 
and planed one Hide; Matehed Hard Pine Top Flooring; Matched Sheathing; 
Novelty Siding; <100 10"xl4" Double Hung Slx-I.lglit Sa*h, Frame*, Weight*. Cord, 
and Hardware, complete; Door* and Frame* complete; 100 Dadger and Vulcan 
Eire ExtlngiilNher*, approved by the Fire Underwriter* ; Steam Pipe from 1" to 
fl" in diameter, long length*; Electric Wiring and Fixture*; Galvanized Iron 
Water Pipe; 00 China Vitreou* Toilet* with % Wooden Seat made by the Trenton 
Pottcrle* Company; Itnhcrold Hoofing; Dl*hp*, Cooking Range*; Small llot- 
Water llcatcr. 

We alno offer for IMMEDIATE SALE all of the material In the following 
Htructure* we are now demoll*hlng: 

The Six -Story Brick Building known as the Back Bay Hotel, 
257-259-263-265 Columbus Avenue, containing: 

Approximately 000,000 Drlek; 400.000 Feet of Framing Stock; Door*, Frame* 
and Flni*h <omplcte; Sa*li, Frame* and Finish complete; Elevator*; Heating 
Plant. Piping and Fixture*; 12 Complete Hath Room Outfit*, containing Porce- 
lain Enameled Hath Tub*. Lavatory and Toilet; Fire E*eape* and Ilaleonle*. 

The Pierce House, corner Chestnut Hill Avenue and Buck- 
minster Road, Brookline, containing : 

200.000 Itriek; 100,000 Feet of 2" Spruce Plank. Square Edge Hoard*, Rough and 
Planed one *lde; 2x3, 2x4 Studding; %" Matched Oak Flooring ; Door*, Frame* 
and Finish complete; Plate Gins* Window*; One Solid Porcelain Hath Tub;’ 
Plumbing Fixture* and Piping, etc., etc. 

Temporary Frame Cantonment Structures now in the Com- 
, monwealth Armory on Commonwealth Avenye, Allston, 
containing: 

100.000 Feet of A**orted Spruce Framing Stock. 

Four Buildings, comer Hanover and Cross Streets, Boston, 
containing the usual kind of building stock. 

We also have at our Storeyard, comer Southampton and 
Atkinson Streets, Boston: 

5.000,000 Feet of all kind* of Spruce and Hard IMne Lumber; 1,000,000 Brick; 
Structural Steel I Ileum*; 48 and 50-pound Relaying Hull*, etc., etc. 

Thl* material I* all thoroughly seasoned, cleaned stock and I* especially 
suitable for bungalow*, two and threc-fumlly house*, and we sell *ame subject 
to inspection before pureha*lng. 

With our fleet of live-ton motor trucks, we eun deliver upon an hour’* notice. 
Truckload lot* of 5000 feet or over delivered free within live mile* of Boston 
Proper. Smaller qunntltie* delivered at a nominal trucking charge. 

BE CONSTRUCTIVE BUT CONSERVATIVE 

REDUCE your BUILDING COSTS by using OUR MATERIAL 


APPLY TO OFFICE OF 


Swift-McNutt Company 

New England’s Leading Building Wreckers 
70 DEVONSHIRE STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

TEL. FORT HILL 5806-7-8 

MEMBERS OF MASTER BUILDERS’ ASSOCIATION 


NOTE — On July first, we will occupy our new offices, 4 Liberty Square, corner. 
Datterymareh and Water Street*. Boston. Entire third floor. 


Catherine, widow of John Farrell, 
aged 78 years. 

McDANIEL, At Lower Falls, June 13, 
Mary, widow of William McDaniel, 
aged 63 yrs., 1 mo., 16 days. 

SHAW, At Newton Centre, June 15, 
Clara D., widow of James C. Shaw, 
aged 58 yrs., 10 mos., 6 days. 



DIED 

McLERIE. At Newton Centre. June 
15, Catherine, wife of David McLerie, 
aged 63 yrs., 8 mos., 27 days. 
KEEFFE. At Nonantum, June 15, Miss 
Hannah A. Keeffe, aged 58 yrs., 9 
mos., 7 days. 

MALOTT. At Newton Hospital, June) 

13, Charles P. Malott of Boston, aged. 
40 years. 

TURNER, At Newton, June 14, Henry , 
Turner, aged 53 yrs., 7 mos., 12 , 
days. | 

WOODBERRY. At West Newton. June' 

14, Horace E. Woodberry, aged 75 

yrs., 8 mos. ( 

FARRELL, At Newtonville, June 15, 


the Camp 

Vacationing 1 




SwettCi 


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Wherever you go — he sure to 
toko ulong Dr. SVwtt'u Root 
Deer. At founts and In bot- 
tles everywhere. 


Distributed by 

G. P. ATKINS, 300 Centre St. Newton 
COCHRANE & HTLUaaTS, Went Newton 


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BUILD YOUR HOME NOW 
AND SAVE MONEY 
DO NOT WAIT until the building boom t ‘l 
Is on, which is sure to advance the price r 
of i&bor and materials. Let us show you J 
the actual estimates, and how you can 
build this seven-room colonial house, with 
all Improvements, for $4200. Call and see 
the plana and see how wo saved the | 
owner $1000 on the cost of thlH building. 
Plans of buildings of every description. I 
HITCHINGS & DITCHINGS. Architects., I 
176 Federal St., Boston, Mass. 


NEWTON SAVINGS BANK 

INCORPORATED 1831 

The Oldest and Largest Bank in the City of Newton 

Deposit Now Interest Begins 

JULY 10 

The only Savings Bank in Newton paying 



/ 



TI1E NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1910. 


Light Four 
Touring 

$1225 



Light Six 
Touring 
$1585 


MOVE PMCES’F.'O.'B. DETROIT 


Big Six Touring , $1985 

R. H. EVANS 

Brook Street, Newton 


Ne wton ville 

—Mr. Charles Brady of Cabot street 
has been visiting relatives at White 
Plains, New York. 

— Miss Nellie G. Case graduated this 
week from Radcliffe College with the 
degree of A.B. 

—Mr. and Mrs. E S. Woodbury of 
Walnut street are going rfext week to 
their camp in the Adirondacks. 

— The last session of the Methodist 
Church Sunday School will be held 
next Sunday at the usual time. 

—Miss Eunice S. Clark graduated 
this week from Simmons College with 
the degree of bachelor of science. 

—Mr. and Mrs. William C. Richard- 


Ne wton ville 

—Mrs. Benjamin Buckingham is 
visiting in New Haven for the sum- 
mer. 

— Miss Elizabeth Starkweather re- 
ceived her degree at Radcliffe this 
week. 

— Mr. Spangler of New York has 
leased the Burgess house on Kimball 
terrace. 

— Mr. Nickerson of Washington, D. 
C., has hired the Pope house on Otis 
street. 

— Dr. Dugan of Brookline, has 
bought the Felton estate on Highland 
avenue. 

— Mrs. J. L. Richards of Kirkstall 
road has gone to West Falmouth for 


son of 109 Highland avenue are spend- 1 the season, 
ing the summer at Kenberma, Mass, i — Mrs. J. S. M. Holley has gone to 
—Miss Abby and Miss Bertha Miller : Blake Cottage. Falmouth Heights for 
are making a trip this week to St. the season. 



RESIDENCE OF MR. M. L. MADDEN, CENTRE ST.. NEWTON 
The scene of Lawn Party of the Elmhurst Alumni last Saturday. 


Newton Hi^nla ids 


John’s, New Brunswick. They will re- 
turn Friday. 

— The beautiful rose gardens of Mr. 
Fred C. Perry on Walnut street, near 
the High School are attracting a large 
amount of attention. 

— Mr. Thomas Stewart of Crafts 
street is one of the incorporators in the 
E. A. Runnells Co. just organized to 
deal in toys and novelties, 

, — ’Next Sunday will be the last ser- 
vice for the sason at the Universaliat 
Church. Services will be resumed on 
the first Sunday in September. 

— The engagement of Mr. Chauncey 
W. Waldron, a former teacher in the 
Vocational High School to Miss Ruth 
Alden has just been announced. 

— Among the graduates this week at 
Smith College with the degree of bach- 
elor of arts are the Misses Abide A. 
Cady. Mary B. Kimball and Dorothy 
B. Martin of this village. 

— Mr. Edward H. Keach announces 
the engagement of his daughter, Ber- 
nice, to Mr. Blunt Ripley of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. Miss Keach is the soprano 
soloist at the Unitarian Church, New- 
ton Centre, and is well known in musi- 
cal circles. 

— Miss Abby Miller and sisters have 
just returned from a visit to Amherst 
College where their nephew, Lloyd Mil- 
ler, has Just graduated. Mr. Miller 
v,' ° s two years over seas where he re- 
ceived the Croix de Guerre. He was 
given a special degree at Amherst. 

—The congregations of the Method- 
ist and of the Central Churches will 
hold union services during July and 
August. During July the services 
will be in charge of the Rev. Charles 
R. Ross of the Methodist Church, and 
during August in charge of the acting 
pastor of the Congregational Church. 

— The following members of the Ep- 
worth League of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church are to be delegates to 
Lasell Institute: Mr. William Cozens, 
Jr.. Miss Ruth Pillman, Miss Esther 
Smith, Miss Lou Pillman, and Miss 
Esther Gibson. The seminary will be 
held the last week of June and the 
first week of July. 

— Miss Rose E. Hennessey of 33 Park 
View avenue, was married Sunday to 
Mr. Neil M. Cheney of Cambridge, by 
Rev. Fr. Slattery, pastor of the Church 
of Our Lady. Miss Florence Hennes- 
sey, sister of the bride, was brides- 
maid. and Grattan Gill of Waltham, 
was best man. A reception was held 
at the home of the bride’s parents 
which was attended by many friends. 
After a wedding trip they will live in 
Cambridge. 

— A welcome home reception to the 
returned soldiers was held Thursday 
evening at the Universalist Church. 
The church was appropriately decor- 
ated, and a splendid musical program 
was given by Mr. and Mrs. Paul R. 
Knight, Mr. Azel Collins, and Miss 
Marie Sladen sang solos, and Major 
Charles Raymond Cabot gave a stir- 
ring patriotic addres to the soldiers 
present. As all have now returned 
from the service, the service flag was 
lowered. The program concluded with 
refreshments and dancing. 

— On Tuesday afternoon Miss Jos- 
ephine G. Collier, organist and director 
at the Methodist Church, gave a piano 
recital at Hotel Vendome. Those 
from Newton who took part were 
Philip Bruce, Richard Lowery, Hlldred 
Tompkins. Marion Timbie, Mary 01- 
cott. Lester Keene, Gilman Lowery. 


— Mr. and Mrs. Clark of Mt. Vernon 
street have gone to Marblehead for 
the summer. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Edgar A. Butters of 
Otis Street have gone to Megansett for 
the summer. 

— Mr. Hubert G. Ripley, Jr., of Birch 
Hill road returned Tuesday from 
Dartmouth College. 

— West Newton Co-operative Bank. 
Start an account this month. 1 to 40 
shares at $1.00 each. Advt. 

— Mr. and Mrs. H. S. French of 
Crafts street have gone to East Booth- 
by, Maine, for the summer. 

— Mr. Parker F. Schofield won the 
best selected nine in 18 holes match 
last Saturday at the Albemarle Golf 
club. 

— Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Starkweather 
are motoring to Ithaca, New York, to 
attend the Semi Centennial of Cornell 
University. 

— Miss Anna I. Miller, a teacher in 
the Department of English, Goucher 
Colle|\ Baltimore, has returned to 
her home for the summer. 

— Mr. Robert Martin, who graduated 
last week from Phillips Andover 
Academy was awarded the Schweppe 
prize in English, the Goodhue prize 
in English Literature, and was award 1 - 
ed a half prize for excellence in Amer- 
ican Archaeology. 

— The Flower Committee of the New- 
tonville Women’s Club has begun its 
usual summer work and invites con- 
tributions of flowers, fruits, vegetables 
and money. Articles should be sent to 
the railroad station on Tuesdays and 
Fridays in time for the 9.13 A. M. 
train. 

— Rev. Ernest W. Halliday, pastor 
of the Ocean Avenue Congregational 
Church, Flatbush, N. Y., has recon- 
sidered his resignation and will not 
accept a call to the Central Church. 
His parish has voted him a $200 sal- 
ary increase, and has started a fund 
for a new building. A promise of in- 
creased religious activity has also 
been made. 


West Newton 

— Mr. Ernest I. Kearns has taken a 
house on Ardmore road. 

— Mrs. M. E. Furbush of Otis street 
is visiting at Greenfield, Mass. 

— Miss Doris Lovell of Otis street 
has returned from Smith College. 

— Miss Carrie Freeman is spending 
the week at Saconnet, Rhode Island. 

— Mr. J. P. Gray of Winthrop street 
is on a motor trip in New York State. 

— Mrs. John L. Gow of Hunter street 
has opened her cottage at Marshfield, 
Mass. 

— The Woman’s Golf Association 
holds a tournament at Brae Burn next 
week. 

The Misses Kartell of 0ti3 street 
have returned from school at Andover, 
Mass. 

Mrs. William E. Bacon and family 
of Temple street are at Jamestown, 
R.I., for the summer. 

— Mr. Franklin T. Kurt, of the 
Chauncey Hall school has purchased 
the Felton house on Prince street. 

—Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Whidden of 
Sterling street and Mrs. R. R. Mer- 
chant of Sewall street are at Falmouth 
for the summer. 

— The Committee in charge of the 
dance next Saturday are Mr. Harry L. 
Ayer, Mr. Frank J. Hyde, and Mr. 


„ „ - Walton L. Crocker. 

Edith Stevens. Carl TimWe, Eva Mac- _ Mr Norman Marshall has sold his 


Causland, and Howard Rich. The last 
number on the program arranged for 
two pianofortes was given by Miss 
Evelyn Densmore and Miss Collier, 
and was particularly worthy of men- 
tion. 



WEDDING GIFTS 
In 

Sterling Silver 
Beau tlf ul New Goods 
Lowest Prices 

*41 SUMMER ST. BOSTON *<* 


house on Chestnut street to Mr. George 
Hoar and has purchased the house 54 
Windemere road, Auburndale. 

—Mrs. J. S. Alley of Brae Burn 
Country Club leaves this week for a 
motor trip'to visit her daughter, Mrs. 
M. C. Sherman of Philadelphia. 

— Mr. Charles* E. Lauriat, Jr., of 
Sewall street returned on Thursday 
from a six weeks’ trip in Europe via 
Hulifax and New York. Mrs. Lauriat 
joined him in New York. 

— On Sunday morning, Maurice 
Sheehan, ton years of age, living on 
Cherry street, was struck by an auto- 
mobile operated by Harry P. Ward of 
Elm street, while on the sidewalk at 
1419 Washington street, i$hd was taken 
to the Newton Hospital. 


Cutters, Lasters, Heel Shavers, Heel Scourers, 
Rapid Stitchers 

First-class operators on the above parts used to working on 
women’s fine shoes can get a first-class job by applying at once. Full 
time except holidays. Fifty weeks in the year. To encourage new 
workmen while they are becoming accustomed to our work, we will 
pay to skilled experienced men who come to work for us before June 
Twentieth and after they have been with us five weeks, a bonus of 
$50. Thomas G. Plant Co., Roxbury District, Boston. Strike on but 
no trouble. 


— A Red Cross meeting was held on 
Tuesday, June 17th. 

— Mrs. Godsoe and family leave on 
Saturday for the Cape. 

— The Wrigley family of Bowdoin 
street are at Duxbury, Mass. 

— Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Bean of Wal- 
nut street have returned from Maine. 

—Mrs. A. W. Elliott of Berwick 
road has returned home from Europe. 

— Miss Cowles of Boston has been 
visiting relatives on Floral street this 
week. 

— The Stevens family of Floral 
place will spend the summer at Truro, 
Mass. 

— Mrs. Charles Ogden expects to 
spend some time in Guilford, Vt., with 
her son. 

— Mrs. Edward Kelley and family 
of Floral street will move to Worces- 
ter, Mass. 

—The sessions of the Congregation- 
al Church School will be omitted un- 
til September. 

— The McKev family and the Ed- 
wards family of Lake avenue are at 
Chatham, Mass. 

— Mrs. R. B. Lapham of Floral 
street has been spending the week in 
New York and Philadelphia. 

— Mrs. C. C. Small and Miss Mildred 
Small of Floral street left Thursday 
for Intervale, N. H., for the summer. 

— The preacher at the Congregation- 
al Church for Sunday. June 22nd, will 
be Rev. Wm. W. Dorman of Whitman, 
Mass. 

— Mrs. Joseph Stevens, son William 
and wife of Amesbury. Mass., were 
guests of Rev. and Mrs. G. W. Jones 
this week. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Ackerman of Pater- 
son. N. J.. have been visiting their 
son, Mr. Frank Ackerman of Walnut 
street the past week. 

— Miss Jeanette Lawson of this village 
was one of the junior ushers who car- 
ried the ivy chain at Smith College 
Class day this week. 

— Rev. G. G. Phipps and Rev. W 
J. Walker attended the Anniversary of 
the Andover Theological Seminary at 
Cambridge on Tuesday. 

— At the annual meeting of the 
Middlesex club on Saturday, Hon. 
Seward W. Jones was re-elected a 
member of the executive committee. 

— A meeting of the Women’s For- 
eign Missionary Society of the Method- 
ist Church was held Thursday eve- 
ning at the home of Mrs. Robert Hop- 
kins on Aberdeen street. 

— Among the graduates this week 
from Simmons College with the de- 
gree of bachelor of science were the 
Misses Esther J Elliott and Beatrice 
E. Garrity of this village. 

— Children’s Day was observed at 
the Methodist Church last Sunday, the 
pastor spoke to the boys and girls at 
the morning service and a fine con- 
cert was given in the evening at 7.30. 

— A Union Picnic of the Sunday 
Schools of the Methodist Churches of 
Upper Falls and Newton Highlands 
and the Baptist Church at Upper Falls 
will be held tomorrow, Saturday, 
June 21st, at Norumbega Park. 


West Newton 

— The Unitarian Church closes for 
the summer after the service next 
Sunday. 

— Capt. Haroid L. Burton, who has 
been visitii\g here, left on Saturday 
for Cleveland, Ohio, his former home. 
Mrs. Burton (nee Smith) and children 
will Join him later. 

— Extra supplies for the West New- 
ton branch of the Red Cross can be 
procured during the summer months 
as follows: June, Mrs. George P. 
Hatch, 30 Putnam street; July. Mrs. 
Benjamin J. Bowen, 13 Hillside ter- 
race; August, Miss Edith B. Wads- 
worth. 337 Highland avenue. 

— The following children have been 
awarded prizes for perfect attend- 
ance at the primary department of 
the Sunday School of the Second 
Church. Ruth Holbrook (5 years), 
Herbert Holbrook (4 years), Minot 
Ross, Hqnry Cate, Constance Barber, 
Rico Argento, Benjamin Bowen (2 
years), and Margaret Barber (l year). 

— Brae Burn will celebrnte the 
Fourth with dancing on the green and 
a band concert in the afternoon. Din- 
ner will be served at 6 and dancing on 
the green in the evening, with fire- 
works, will furnish lots of fun for the 
members and guests. Messrs. Harry L. 
Ayer, Frank J. Hale, and W. L. Crock- 
er comprise the committee in charge of 
the arrangements. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Francis Newhull of 
Temple street, announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter. Elizabeth, to 
Richard A. Marschcat. Durtmoutlf, ’17, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Marschcat 
of Ashley Falls, Maas. Upon this 
country's entrance into the war, Mr. 
Marschcat enlisted in the United States 
Navy. He later was transferred to 
Naval Aviation Service and upon re- 
ceiving his commission, at Pensacola, 
Fla., was ordered to Chatham on the 
Cape, where he did active duty in the 
submarine air patrol, during the re- 
mainder of the war. He is now en- 
gaged in foreign trading in New York 
city. 


Aub urn dale 

— Mr. Paul Libby is moving his fam 
ily to Indianapolis. 

— West Newton Co-operative Bank. 
Start an account this month. 1 to 10 
shares at $1.00 each. Advt. 

— Miss Ruth St. Amant is finishing 
her first year’s work at Simmons Col- 
lege, in the Social Service Course. 

— Mr. Donald McAllister has re- 
turned from France and is making his 
home with his mother on Central 
street. 

— Tonight the Boy Scouts will hold 
an open meeting in the Parish House 
of the Methodist Church, to which all 
parents and friends are invited. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Ray S. Adams, who 
were married by the Rev. Edward 
Jayson Drew on June 7th will make 
their home at 6 Sharon avenue. 

— Although last Sunday was Chil- 
dren’s Sunday at the Congregational 
Church the Sunday School will not 
close before June 29th. 

— The pupils of Mrs. Julia Pickard 
Stoessel gave a very interesting recital 
of violin music to their friends on 
Thursday evening at the Methodist 
parish house. 

— Money deposited in Auburndale 
Co-operative Bank goes on interest 
monthly. Interest is compounded 
four times a year,. La3t dividends at 
rate of 5% per cent. advt. 

— Lt. Leonard H. Nason, instructor 
in horsemanship at Norwich Univer- 
sity, Northfield, Vt.. is spending a 
three months’ furlough with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Nason of 
Woodland road. 

* — Mr. Everett Titcomb gave a recital 
with his piano pupils one evening last 
week. Mr. Titcomb was for a number 
of years organist at the Church of the 
Messiah and is now at St. John’s 
Church in Boston. 

— The Lawn Party at the Church of 
the Messiah on Saturday, was very 
well attended. The beautiful day 
brought out more than were expected 
and a lunch supper on the lawn was 
served informally so that all might 
stay for the evening. The hurdv gurdv 
was taken into the hall and the young 
people enjoyed dancing to its giddy 
strains. 

— The Methodist and Congregational 
Churches will unite during the sum- 
mer. the services being held in the 
Methodist Church during July and in 
the Congregational Church in August. 
Rev. George S. Butters will preach 
during July except on the first Sunday 
when Bishop E. H. Hughes will preach 
before the Epworth Institute which 
will hold its Sunday service in the 
Methodist Church. 

— The pupils of Mrs. Nelson Free- 
man closed the season with an enjoy- 
able recital last evening at Mrs. Free- 
man’s home on Lexington street. The 
program included selections by Clar- 
ence and Carrie Henley. Pauline Gil- 
man, Blanche and David Walter. Har- 
riet and Alice Atkinson. Edward 
Stearns, Sylvia Sweet, Priscilla Den- 
nett, Robert Clapp, Dorothy and Mar- 
garet Merrill. Helen Maloney. Dorothy 
Estabrook, Wendell Walker. Ruth Bai- 
ley. Elizabeth Jewett. Reed Champion. 
Richard Halewood. Alfred Place. Mur- 
iel Kimball, William Carlev. Harriet 
and Florence Rourka, Warren Hunter, 
Dorothy Hayes. Willard Tyler. Muriel 
Howland, Elizabeth Hammond. Lucy 
Le Vert, Alice Dudley, and Dorothy 
Herrick. A social hour followed the 
music. 

— At the annual meeting of the 
Christian Endeavor Society held re- 
cently at the home of the secretary. 
Chauncey Spaulding, the following 
were elected for the ensuing year: 
president, Ruth Perkins; vice-presi- 
dent. Chauncey Spaulding; secretary. 
Dorothy Grant; treasurer. John Per- 
kins; corresponding secretary, Hilda 
Lawrence ; Lookout committee, 
Chauncey Spaulding; Prayer Meeting 
committee, Muriel Howland: social 
committee, Ruth Stickney; missoinary 
committee. Henry Atkinson; flower 
committee, Addison Knapp; Good Lit- 
erature committee, Leo Bova; Pastor’s 
Aid Committee. Theodore Grant; 
Music committee. Barbara Smith; 
Junior committee, Gladys Lawrence; 
good citizenship committee. George 
Harding. 


ANNUAL FIELD DAY 


A DICKENS FELLOWSHIP 


A Boston Branch of the world-wide 
Dickens Fellowship has been recently 
organized to knit together in a com- 
mon bond of friendship the lovers of 
Dickens. Mr. Amos Woodbury Ride- 
out. 334 Old South Building, Boston, 
is the president and further informa- 
tion for those interested can be ob- 
tained from him. 


BOY SCOUTS 


Norumbega Troop will give a re- 
ception tomorrow afternoon and even- 
ing to Mr. Ormond E. Loomis who has 
just resigned us Scout Executive for 
Greater Boston. The ulfair will take 
place ut the new Oak Hill quarters of 
the Troop on the Ovington estate at 
Oak Hill ami a most enjoyable time 
is anticipated. 


The annual field day and outdoor 
reunion of the Church of Our Lady 
will be held on the church grounds, 
corner Washington and Adams streets 
Saturday afternoon and evening. 

Rev. Lawrence W. Slattery, pastor 
of the church, is supervisor of Dis 
trict 1. Rev. Walter J. Roche, super- 
visor of District 2. and Rev. Conrad 
J. Quirbach, supervisor of District 3. 

Mrs. James Flanagan is chairman 
of District 1 committee, and is being 
assisted by Miss Katherine Flanagan 
secretary; Miss Julia Enegess, treas- 
urer, and Mrs. George P. Flood, chair- 
man of the entertainment committee. 

Mrs. James T. Burns heads District 
2 committee. Miss Mary Buckley is 
secretary, and Miss Margaret Vahey, 
treasurer. Mrs. J. F. Mulligan is 
chairman of District 3 committee, 
with Miss Mary Mahan and Miss Kath- 
erine Murphy, secretaries, and Miss 
Katherine Hewes, treasurer. 

The athletic events are in charge 
of John E. Murphy, chairman; James 
P. Atkins. Nicholas Murphy, Edw*ard 
Hanlon, John .1. Murphy. John A. Mc- 
Grath, Edward McCrudden and John 
Atkins. 

The music committee comprise 
Thomas F. Fitzgerald, chairman 
Thomas F. Bryson, -James Burns, Rob- 
ert Casey, Michael A. Crowley. Wil- 
liam P. Dalton, William S. Dalton. 
John J. Fitzgerald, Jr., Edward Han- 
lon. George King, D. Walter Kerns 
and John Mahon. Francis B. Driscoll 
is chairman of the novelty committee. 


X. H. S. 


The Boston College High and New- 
ton High post-season game next Sat- 
urday will be played at Braves Field 
The game should be a thriller, and 
will afford an excellent chance to size 
up the two best schoolboy pitchers of 
the 1919 season. The first-base bleach 
ers have been reserved for the Boston 
College rooters and the third-base 
bleachers for the Newton High rooters. 

Learn to Talk. 

All very well, to quote the old say- 
ing about speech being silvern, but 
silence golden. Learn to talk, if you 
waut to get on In the world. There 
are some folk who talk too much, it’s 
true, but they are better than those 
who are mute nnd wrapped up in them- 
selves. A wall of reserve Isn’t at all 
a pleasant thing to come up against 


FOR SALE 


FOR SALE — Upright Groeger Piano, 
first-class condition. Call Monday or 
Tuesday. 344 Centre St.. Newton. 
Suite 1. Tel. Newton North 2039-M. 


FOR SALE — Two Boston Terrier 
pups, 4 months. Perfect markings, 
male and female. P. McKenna, 42 
Newbury St., Newton Centre. Tel. 
1585-M Newton South. 


FOR SALE — On Cabot St., Newton- 
ville. a single house, all improve- 
ments. hot water heat. $5,250. D. P. 
O’Sullivan. Real Estate and Insurance, 
286 Cabot St.. Newtonville. 


LOST and FOUND 


LOST — In a Newtonville store. 
Tuesday morning. June 17th. a black 
umbrella, monogram W. W. H.. on top 
of handle. Please return to S14 Wa- 
tertown St., or telephone X. W. 13S9W 
and receive reward. 


LOST — On June 9, at Newton Cen- 
tre. a platinum bar pin set with small 
pearls and diamonds. Reward. Tel- 
ephone 561 Newton South. 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law. next of kin. cred- 
itors. and all other persons inter- 
ested iu the estate of Lucretia R. 
Smith late of Newton in said Coun- 
ty, deceased, intestate. 

WHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration on the estate of said 
deceased to Charles B. Moore of New- 
ton. in the County of Middlesex, with- 
out giving a surety on his bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at 
a Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge, in said County of Middlesex, on 
the seventh day of July A. D. 1919, at 
nine o’clock in the forenoon, to show 
cause if any you have, why the same 
should not be granted 
An 1 the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public uotice thereof, by 
publishing this citation ouce in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the last publication 
to be one day, at least, before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles .1. Me hit Ire, Es- 
iiulre. First Judge of said Court, this 
eighteenth day of June in the year 
one thousand nine hundred and nine- 
teen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
June 20-27-July 4 



■ iORSj g 

Deposits Draw Interest 
from July 10th 


BOOKKEEPER 

Accuracy, rapidPy and neat- 
ness essential. Must have thor- 
ough knowledge of double entry 
and write an A-l hand. Apply 
in person or telephone between 
12 and 1 noon. Wellesley 102. to 
Newton Ice Co., Newton Lower 
Falls. 


WANTED 

MAN AND WIFE would like living 
room and bedroom furnished or un- 
furnished. in private family, accessi- 
ble to Boston, about Sept. 10th. Would 
consider board or light housekeeping 
privileges. References exchanged. 

Address *‘F,” Graphic Office. 

WANTED — Occupation, few* hours 
daily for school girl, mind children or 
light duties. Good recommendation. 
836 Walnut St.. Newton Highlands. 

WANTED— By High School gradu- 
ate with chauffeur's license and fine 
references, position to drive for pri- 
vate party for the summer. Address 
T. E. C.. Graphic Office, or Tel. X. X. 
2299- W. between 6 and 8 P. M. 

WANTED— A reliable girl of High 
School age to look after a baby sev- 
eral afternoons each week during the 
summer. Apply at 95 Fountain St.. 
West Nfewton. Tel. N. W. 174-R. 

WANTED — By experienced man; 
work as gardener and general care- 
taker. bv the day or hour. Tel. New- 
ton West 1116-M. 

WANTED— Ladies of pleasing ad- 
dress to sell Versailles perfume, face 
powders, creams, etc., large returns 
for those who can qualify. Whole or 
part time. Call or write. Miss Picker- 
ing. F. C. Gale & Co., 17 Edinboro 
street. Boston. 

WANTED — Mother’s helper, intelli- 
gent girl 15 to IS. good vacation work, 
light housekeeping, assisting mother 
with young baby. Hours 10 to 7. 
Newton-Brighton line. Tel. Newton 
North 2922-M. 

WANTED — Boarding homes for 
babies, within fifteen miles of Boston, 
where intelligent care will be given. 
Good locality and good sanitary con- 
ditions required. Address Miss Mary 
S. Doran. Boston Children’s Aid So- 
ciety, 43 Hawkins street, Boston. 

WANTED— Small suite of 5 to 7 
rooms, modern, or would like small 
house in good location, June or July 
1st. Address R., Graphic Office. 

WANTED— A neat girl. 16 or 17. as 
mother’s helper to assist in light 
house-work and the care of two chil- 
dren. Can go home nights. Tel. New- 
ton NorQi 2646-W. 

WANTED — An apartment or small 
house iu Newton. Tel. X. No. 2572-W 

For Summer Rental 

Bungalow’ of 7 rooms, house and 
grounds in excellent condition, mod- 
ern conveniences of every description. 
Cool, quiet, exclusive neighborhood. 
Price $240 for 3 months, which in- 
cludes care of lawn, water, gas. tele- 
phone, and electricity. Tel. Fort Hill 
3207. 

I'O LEI 

TO LET In private house. :> larg« 
rooms for storage. Tel. 3082-W New- 
ton North. 


FOR KENT At Auburndale. second 
floor apartment, 6 rooms, bath. Ad- 
dress 42 Maple St.. Auburndale. Tel 
89S-W Newton West, evenings. 

TO LET — In Newtonville. two 
rooms with bath, quiet street, screen- 
ed iu porch, near electrics aud train. 
Man and wife or business womeu pre- 
ferred. Tel. Newton North 6U-W. 


Auloniobll# OarvtM TsUphaM 

CEO. W. MILLS 

Undertaker 

Any wh«r« Mt Any Tim* 
Mortuary ('hapti mi BwvIm mi ftlww 

•17 AND III WASUINOTON I 

.\K»ToMUX4 


WOODLAND 

PARK 

A Boarding School for Girls and 
a Country Day School for Girls, 
and for Boys under ten. 

The Junior Department of Lasell 
Seminary 

Located in attractive and com- 
fortable building formerly known 
as the Woodland Park Hotel. 
Kindergarten, Primary and 
Grammar Grade* 
Conversational French, Music 
with supervised practice. Drawing 
Sewing. Folk and Social Dancing 
and Deportment, Swimming and 
Riding; Individual attention. An 
abundance of good wholesome 
food, fresh air. exercise and sleep. 
Visitors Always Welcome 
Come and see the school and 
talk over the problem. For cata- 
log address 

GUY M. WINSLOW. 
Auburndale, Mass 

Phone 

Newton West 630 


.MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF 
REAL ESTATE 

L nder and by virtue of the power 
of sale contained in a certain mort- 
gage of real estate given by Charles 
A. Dooley of Boston, Suffolk County 
Massachusetts to David A. Yuill of 
Somerville. Middlesex County. Massa- 
chusetts. dated March 14, 1917, and re- 
corded with Middlesex South District 
Deeds. Book 4122, Page 301. for breach 
of the condition of said mortgage and 
for the purpose of foreclosing the 
same, will be sold at lAiblic auction 
on the premises on Monday. July 14. 
1919. at 2:30 O'clock in the afternoon, 
the real estate described in said mort- 
gage. to wit: 

"ihe laud with the buildings there- 
on. situated iu that part of Newton. 
Middlesex . County, Massachusetts, 
called Newton Centre and shown as 
Lot No. 50 on a “Plan of Brentwood 
Park in Newton Centre,” E. S. Smiiie, 
Surveyor, dated July 1S97. and duly 
recorded with Middlesex South Dis- 
trict Deeds, and bounded and de- 
scribed as follows: — 

Easterly by Pleasant Street, eighty 
(SO) feet: 

Northerly by Lot No. 51 on said 
plan, one hunured and ten (110) feet; 

Westerly in part by Lot No. 45 and 
in part by Lot No. 46 on said plan, 
ninety (9u> teet; 

Southerly in part by Lot No. 4S aud 
in part by Lot No. 49 on said plan, one 
hundred and seventeen (117) feet. 

Containing uiue thousand three 
hunured aud twenty (9.320 > square 
feet ot laud. 

Subject to restrictions so far os now 
in force and applicable as set forth iu 
deed given to said Charles A. Dooley 
by the Hub Real Estate Corporation.” 

Said premises will be sold subject 
to all unpaid taxes, tax titles, muni- 
cipal liens and assessments, if any. 
Three hundred dollars ($300) required 
at sale 

COLUMBIA TRUST COMPANY, 

_ Assignee. 

boi turther particulars apply to 
Swain, Carpenter & Nay. Attorneys 
for the Assignee. Rooms 1111-1117 
Paddock Building, 101 Tremout Street, 
Boston. Mass. 

June 20-27-July 4. 


MISCELLANEOUS 

M ESE will take oases, either se: 
by the hour, day or night. Reliev 
•egular nurse or family in case i 
hronic patients, semi-invalids c 
teething babies. Light massage an 
baths for nervous and tired peopli 
Apply by letter to "G,” Graphic Otttci 


REM NED \Ol Mi LVOV desires to 

tutor young children b> the week or 
hour. Highest references. Address 
”C.” Graphic Office. 


PIANO FREE! YOU can have 
piano for 3 to 10 uios. if you will 
moving charge aud take good cart 
it. Upright. Rich tuue. Tel. N. 
959. References required. 


J. E. BLANCHARD, Furniture and 
Piauo Moving, Geuerul Trucking, 72 Vi 
Elmwood St.. Newtou. Toi. N. N. 
1198-M, X. N 593- W. 




THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1010. 


Tae reliance that wouienkind hi* 
learned to put in ernekers is heinfl 
well illustrated at the tens belli] 
giver, for returning soldiers 

sailors. 

Every woman in th^ uietrnpoii 
has in her pantry n generous sui| 
ply of the National Biscuit Coni| 


sugar tilled wafers which they sup* 

[ported. 

There was no question nbont the 
omplcte success of Nettle’s dlscov- 
fragrance of the fresh 
which she served added 
o the inviting repast. 

Another favorite at the tea hour — 
ost ns much 
hcon — is the 
B. C. Graham Cracker. It seems 


tally accept 

Nettie, n comely young woniai 
yeoman of the Navy, still in uniB»<lispon.snl»le hi modern housekeep- 
form, found herself mmxjj|^^Bg|p^Ul»Jvh^ve been so thoroughly 
entertaining a thousands oi 

uptown home flour that 

Including I O eat One ^ a mat* 

a is * 0 crea ^e an appetite ^B^rmiue 

for another— and there is no 
danger of over-eating. N. B. C. 
Graham Crackers have health build- 
ing and digestive qualities which make 
them the national health food. 

NATIONAL BISCUIT 
COMPANY 

eat^ - 
ThS 

Ions efij 
served, 1 h?I 
now the tca^ 
again, and the 
venled, in a slid 
On a thick l>ed oF 
edged with sassafras^ 
mona and Lotus biscuit wert^ 

Some bruised leaves lay at the'i 
tom of the basket, and the petals? 
emitted a delicate fragrance, adding palTSf 
charm to the delightfully flavored. | course t7J 


: Graham 
■breakfast — 
| cheese for 
pkes a more 
than har- 
■new a man 
Ice recently 
pry difficult 
was either 
^ He had re- 

. C. Graham Cracker*. 


Y. M. C. A. WINS 


Newton A’. H. C. V. Baseball Team 
Defeats Boston A’. M. C. A. 9 — 1 


The local Y. M. C. A. team added 
another victory to its list Saturday 
afternoon by defeating the Boston 
“Y” team 9 — 1. 

Newton won by superior box work 
and hitting, Hunt and Barnes of New- 
ton allowing but one hit apiece, while 
the Boston pitchers were touched up 
for eleven smashes. Hunt not only 
had a big day on the mound but also 
featured at the bat, hitting for a 1000 
three out of three, one of which went 
for 3 bags. 

The locals are going strong and a 
good schedule of games has been ar- 
ranged for the home grounds. Next 
Saturday the fast Needham Town team 
will be here for a game. 


Removal Notice 

Merchant's Co-operative Bank 

of Boston 

Will Occupy New Quarters at 

51 Cornhill 

AFTER JULY 1ST 
Owing to Increase of Business 


LODGES 


Mr. and Mrs. Asa C. Jewett enter- 
tained the members of the drill corps 
of Gethsemane Commandery. Knights 
Templar, and their ladies on Tues- 
day at their summer home, in Green 
Harbor, Mass. The guests arrived 
during the forenoon in automobiles 
and most of the gentlemen went fish- 
ing. Mr. Walter H. Barney of Newton 
Centre and Dr. Roark of Waltham 
either having the best luck or the 
greatest skill. A most enjoyable clam 
hake was served under a large tent 
on the grounds during the afternoon. 


The new Lighting Fixtures in Ital- 
ian. Rusty Iron and Polyechrome and 
Colonial styles as shown by Messrs. 
McKenney & Waterbury Co., 181 
Franklin street, corner Congress. Bos- 
ton. Mass., are really works of Art. 


ALTItM^LKIMSlKANCE 

AT COST 

• miy Pa y Wore • 

Massochusetts Mutual Auto. Ins. Ca 
Automobile Mutual Liability Ins. Ca 
40 Central Street, Boston 


HERMANN SULZEN 

VIOLIN TEACHER AND SOLOIST 
Terms, $2.00 per Lesson 
Available for Social Affairs 
10 NONANTUM STREET NEWTON 

Tel. Newton North 757-R 


EDITH A. CUSHING 

CUSTOM CORSETS TO ORDER 

Altered or Repaired 
110 TREMONT ST„ BOSTON 

Telephone Fort Hill 2149 


Tel a Back Bay 53628, 75877 
Hour* 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. Dally 
Saturday 9 A. M. to 1 P. 1L 

Boston Employment Agency 

Licensed 

Established 29 Years 
MRS. H. G. PRESTON. Manager 

SUPERIOR HOUSEHOLD, HOTEL and 
INSTITUTION HELP OF ALL KINDS 
$74 BOYLSTON STREET. BOSTON, MASS. 



WHEEL CHAIRS 


The Largest Selection in New England 

SICK ROOM REQUISITES 

of Every Description 

F. H. THOMAS CO. 

689-691 Boylston Street, Boston 

Tel. Back Bay 1196 


8. C. Bulbullan TeL Beach 710 

Oriental Rug Works 

Cleaning. Stretching and Repairing at 
All Kinds 

Bogs and Needle Art Works 
by Armenian Experts 
1*0 BOYLSTON 8T.. BOSTON, MASS. 
Room 725 

R evidence, Auburndale — Tsl. Con. 


VERI-BRITE 

The Polish Everybody Is Using 
Once Used Always Csed 
Trial Bottle 35c 

Your Nearest Dealer 
or 

THE LINWOOD CO. 

46 Cornhill, Boston 


WANTED 

All \Jmls of Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s 
cast-ofi clothing, furs. Jewelry, books, 
etc. 

MRS. MONAHAN 
273 Tremont Street, BostoH 

Telephone Beach 5742 


FLAG POLE 

Derrick, Spar, Tent, Pike and 
Bean Poles, Cellar Posts. 

Also Spruce and Oregon Spars, 
all lengths 

BOSTON FLAG POLE CO. 

169 Broadway Extension 
South Boston TeL So. Boston 112 


Telephone, Beach 7573 


W. G. Weeber, Mgr. 


LINCOLN CARE COMPANY 

HOUSE CLEANING 

Cleaning, Painting, Kaliomining, Window Washing, 
Renovation of Rug» and Carpets 
In fact all work incidental to proper care of any estate 
119 LINCOLN STREET, . . . BOSTON, MASS. 



Nobody but yourself knows 
you are weurtng bifocals when 

>uu wmr liKYt*J'OUh. 


A Convenient Service 

We keep u complete and permanent record 
of the eyeelght requirements of our putrona. 

If you break your lenses, simply telephone 
or drop us a card and new lenses will be made 
for you at once. 

HOMER’S OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

WM. S. SCHAFFER, Reg. Optometrist 
Formerly with Andrew J. Lloyd Co. 

45 WINTER ST., BOSTON 
One minute from Park and Cambridge Subways 


LASELL 

Class Night 


The class night occurred on Monday 
evening. Carrying the daisy chain on 
their shoulders the seniors marched 
across the campus and on to the out 
of door stage singing the processional 
with the refrain "Carry On.” 

Miss Priscilla Alden, the president, 
welcomed the guests. Miss Mercia 
Nichols called the class roll. Tho 
prophecy was given by Miss Edith 
Vance, Miss Frances O. Breen and 
Miss Phyllis Rowe. The mementoes 
by Miss Helen Webster. A set of 
Shnkespeare’s volumes, the class gift 
to the school, presented by Miss Ethel 
Ramage and the farewell address 
given by Miss Olive Chase. 

To the music of the recessional the 
seniors then marched to the various 
houses accompanied by their torch- 
bearers the farewell to Bragdon hall 
was said by Frances Weider. At Gar- 
den. the senior home. Miss Dorothy 
Hall. Then once more the procession 
went on halting this time about the 
Flames. After the song and ceremony 
of the loving cup and the old time 
ceremony of the Flames. 


Reunion 


A most unusual feature of the reun- 
ion which followed the commencement 
luncheon on Tuesday was the greeting 
of the Preceptress, who was in charge 
50 years ago. Miss Chamberlain, — al- 
so two "old girls” who were at Lasell 
school 53 years ago and one 52. 70 r ' 

of the class who had been graduated 
30 years returned and were a con- 
stant joy to the school and guests 
during their stay of five days. It was 
one of the largest reunions in the his- 
tory of the school, several hundred of 
the old girls in attendance. 


Commencement Exercises 


The Congregational church was 
crowded to its capacity on Tuesday 
morning for the graduation exercises. 
Prayer was offered by Dr. Drew' and 
two selections for violin, 'cello and 
piano artistically played. 

Congressman Robert Luce gave the 
address. In part he said, "You must 
learn to think straight and yet there 
is something greater than that, for the 
highest purpose of education is not 
to enable us to do something, but to 
be something, to live the life that shall 
be the fullest and most roundly com- 
plete. that shall bring you the most 
pleasure and profit, but more than that 
shall bring it to others. 

The conferring of diplomas and the 
charge to the graduating class by Dr. 
Winslow was, as always, most impres- 
sive. 


Commencement Sunday 


The baccaleureate sermon was 
preached in the Congregational church 
by the Rev. J. T. Stocking, D. D., of 
Montclar, N. J. Prayer was offered by 
Dr. Butters and Dr. Drew introduced 
Dr. Stocking, welcoming him to the lo- 
cality where he had worked so faith- 
fully in previous years. 

The Doom of the Timid was the 
speaker’s theme, his text being "There 
was a man of the Pharisees named 
Xicodemus." Very graphically he 
drew the picture of Nicodemus, and 
his failure to stand the test. He chal- 
lenged the class to heroism by the 
many big problems they face. The 
challenge of youth who has suffered 
in the war is a challenge of service 
and its message is "Scorn to be safe.” 


DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

MIrb Marian Keep, Editor 

lees. 


Ices and other frozen dishes are the 
moBt popular desserts during the 
summer months. They are cooling, 
refreshing and .nourishing when prop- 
erly taken. Often times it is the only 
way in which nourishment can be 
given to the sick. 

Ice creams contain crenm, or eggs 
and milk as a substitute for it; sugar 
and flavoring are needed. 

Water ices are still Rimpler in 
their composition, as they contain 
only water, sugar and fruit juice. 

The ingredients of \ce cream ren- 
der it highly nutritious; when fruit 
is ndded to water ices, the food val- 
ue is greatly increased. 

Freezing is accomplished by means 
of crushed ice and salt. The salt and 
ice combine and form an intensely 
cold brine, which freezes the mixture 
immersed in it. 

Three parts of cracked Ice to one 
of rock salt are used for freezing ice 
creams. Equal parts of ice and salt 
are used for sherbets and water ices. 


To Mould Frozen Mixtures. 


When frozen . mixtures are to be 
bricked or moulded, avoid freezing 
too hard. Pack mixture solidly in 
moulds and cover with buttered pa- 
per. buttered side up. Have moulds 
so full that the mixture will be forced 
down sides of mould when cover is 
pressed down. Pack again in salt 
and ice. using one part of salt to four 
parts of ice. 


Pineapple Sherbet, 


Last Chapel 

Tuesday morning Dr. Winslow led 
the last Chapel exercises, after the 
devotional service the prizes were 
given to the winners of the various 
contests and certificates awarded in 
music, bookkeeping, stenography and 
typewriting. 

he most prized award is always 
the little gold loaf given as first prize 
In the bread-making contest, this go- 
ing to Miss Ethel Ramage of St. Johns- 
bury, Vt., Miss Doris Rogers of Lynn, 
Mass., receiving the silver loaf, the 
second prize. Miss Olive Chase re- 
ceived the medal for the highest schol- 
arship for two years’ consecutive 
work. Among the many other prizes 
given were the ones to the Junior crew 
which won the Canoe races last Mon- 
day. 


UNION FIELD DAY 

The union field day of the Newton 
Centre churches held at the Riverside 
Recreation Grounds Saturday was a 
great success. 

About 450 attended. The afternoon 
sports w'ere divided into three periods. 
In the first were held community 
games; in the second, individual con- 
tests; and in the third, water sports. 
The athletic program was in charge 
of a committee headed by Mr. I^eary 
and Miss Flanders. 

In the first period the married men 
beat the single men in baseball by 
11 to 7, and the boys beat the girls by 
14 to 3, altho the boys played left 
handed. A Tug of War. dodge ball 
and volley ball completed this period. 

The 40 yard race was won by Mac- 
Cullan; the 50 yard by Leraont, the 
75 yard by Murphy, and the relay by 
a team composed of Kevorkian, Ryall, 
Fisher and Rich. 

The tub race was won by Darrell; 
the swimming race for girls by Bar- 
bara Kendall. Lemont, Holbrook and 
Millner won the boys’ swimming 
races. Water polo and a tilting match 
completed the water sports. 

Before supper a group picture was 
tuken, and after supper singing was 
enjoyed by all. 

The committee in charge conssted 
of E. C. Lewis, chairman; W. H. 
Rice, E. A. Greene. Tracey Rudd, R. 
B. Emery, Wm. Breed uml Mr. Leury 
and Miss Flanders. 


Formalin for Ingrowing Toenail. 

Suldey udvhes application of a so 
lution of formaldehyde (formalin) for 
the relief of Ingrowing toenail. A pled- 
get of cotton wet with formalin Is 
swabbed over the granulations once 
every day. The pain is relieved almost 
Immediately, the Inflammation Is rap- 
idly reduced und the cure Is practi- 
cally complete in four or five buys.— 
Journal de Medectne et do Chlrurgle 
Practiqueg. 


2 c finely shredded pineapple. 

1 tsp. granulated gelatin. 

1-4 c cold water. 

2 c boiling water. 

2 c sugar. 

2 lemons. 

Soak the gelatin in cold water, add 
the boiling water and sugar; stir it 
until the gelatin is dissolved and add 
the lemon juice. Strain the mixture 
and set it aside to cool. When it is 
cool add the pineapple to the mix- 
ture and freeze it. 


Strawberry Ice. 


4 c water. 

1 1-2 c sugar 
2 c strawberry juice. 

1 tbsp. lemon juice. 

Make a syrup by boiling water and 
sugar twenty minutes, add lemon 
juice, cool, strain, add strawberry 
juice, freeze. 


Banana lee ( ream. 


1 tbsp. gelatine. 

4 bananas. 

1 1-2 tsp. lemon juice. 

% c sugfcr. 

1 pt. milk. 

1 can condensed milk. 

1-2 c hot water. 

Dissolve the gelatine in the water. 
Rub the bananas through a sieve, then 
add the gelatine, lemon juice, sugar 
and milk. Freeze. 


DEATH OF MBS. MORSE 


Mrs. Clara Rebecca (Bolt) Morse, 
widow of George W. Morse, and long 
a resident of Xewtonville, died on 
Sunday in Hollywood, a suburb of Ix>s 
Angeles, Cal., where she was visiting 
one of her sons, Henry B. Morse, at 
his home in that place. Mrs. Morse 
went to California in January and 
early in February suffered a paralytic 
stroke. On Saturday last, pneumonia 
developed and her death followed on 
Sunday. 

Mrs. Morse, who on Feb. 3 reached 
the age of sixty-eight years, was born 
in Newton Lower Falls, the daughter 
of James Henry Boit and Amanda 
Church (Berry) Boit. She received 
exceptional educational advantages, 
including the study of art, and became 
a painter of marked ability. She had 
the added advantage of considerable 
foreign travel. On Oct 20, 1870, Miss 
Boit was married to George Washing- 
ton Morse, a Boston lawyer, Civil War 
veteran and former member of the 
Massachusetts Legislature. 

For many years, Mrs. Morse’s resi- 
dence had been at 130 Court street in 
Xewtonville and her home had been 
the scene of constant hospitality. She 
is survived by her son, Henry, at* 
whose home in Hollywood she died; 
also another son. Samuel F. B. Morse, 
of San Francisco, who is an official 
of the Pacific Improvement Company, 
and there are three surviving daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Nicholas Richardson of 
Xewtonville, formerly Miss Harriet C. 
Morse; Mrs. Rosalind Morse Ixivell 
and Mrs. Alan M. Hay, who before her 
marriage was Miss Genevieve Morse, 
marriage was M ss Genevieve Morse. 
Mrs. Lovell and Mrs. Hay have made 
their home with their mother in New- 
tonville. 

The body will be brought to New- 
tonville in charge of two sons and the 
funeral services will be held at her 
late home, 120 Court street on Tues- 
day afternoon at 3 o’clock. The inter- 
ment will be in the family lot at Bed- 
ford, Mass. 

Y. M. C. A. 


Last Sunday afternoon an open air 
meeting was held on the Newton Y. 
M. C. A. grounds. The above meeting 
at which the Rev. Newton A. .Merritt, 
Jr., spoke, was well attended and en- 
joyed by all. It is the plan of the As- 
sociation to carry on with these meet- 
ings every Sunday afternoon at 4. At 
this same hour on June 22nd, Mr. Al- 
lan C. Emery, a former president of 
the Association, will speak on a sub- 
ject of special interest to Young Men. 
Come and enjoy this Inspiration of 
word and song in the open air. In 
case of a sudden shower the meeting 
will he held In the building. 



DIAMONDS 


*41 .SUMMER ST. BOSTON- 


REPUBLIC’S TWO GREAT DAYS 


Ecuador Twice a Year Celebrate* Its 
Freedom From the Domination 
of the Spaniard. 

The republic of Ecuador celebrates 
two national holidays, and. strange to 
say, both are "Independence days." 
Both are observed with the same en 
thuslnsm and patriotic fervor that Is 
displayed here on the anniversary ot 
the adoption of the Immortal deelarn 
tlon, according to the Pan-American 
Union. 

The liberty-loving pntrlot3 had to 
shoot two bolts at Spanish domination 
before they succeeded In gaining per 
nianent Independence. The first time 
they had a quiet but determined revo- 
lution in Quito, the present cupltal of 
the republic, the patriots assembling 
nt the house of Munuela Cnnizares, a 
brave and beautiful woman, on Au- 
gust 5, 1809, when they prepared their 
declaration of' Independence and chose 
the officials who were to compose the 
provisional government. That night 
the conspirators gathered their forces 
In different parts of the eltj\ and Cap- 
tain Sallnns, who commanded the two 
companies of regular troops onld 
guarded the city, sent to their bar- 
racks, read to them the declaration 
and won them over to the cause of 
the patriots. They overpowered the 
bodyguard of Ruiz de Castilla, the 
Spanish governor, early on the morn- 
ing of August 10 and thus established 
the first republic without shedding a 
drop of blood. It lasted only about a 
year, when Castilla succeeded In over- 
throwing the patriotic government and 
again brought the country under Span- 
ish dominion. 

The fires of liberty had been kin- 
dled, however, and the Eeuadorenns 
kept up their heroic struggle notwith- 
standing many reverses, until In 1820 
the people of Guayaquil, the lending 
seaport of the country, succeeded In 
rebelling on the 0th of October. With 
the aid of Gen. Simon Bolivar, the 
great Venezuelan emancipator, and of 
his compatriot, Gen. Antonio Jose 
Sucre, the Ecuadoreans nfter many 
bloody battles succeeded In complete- 
ly annihilating the Spanish forces and 
established freedom In Ecuador for- 
ever. Therefore It Is that the Ecua- 
doreans celebrate two "independence 
days." the 10th of August and the 9th 
of October. 


New Male Garment Planned. 

Get ready for next fall, fellows, for 
the blanket cape. For you are going 
to have your appearance changed. The 
new sartorial style Is really a cape and 
blanket, which will be hung over many 
n pair of masculine shoulders. Just 
how mnny It will hang over Is yet to 
be determined, hut If the Interest the 
Invention aroused nt the concluding 
session of the semi-annual meeting of 
the American Designers’ association In 
the Martinique hotel Is sustained the 
garment will acquire considerable 
vogue, writes the New York corre- 
spondent of the Pittsburgh Dispatch. 
The blanket cape consists of an army 
blanket with a few holes and buttons 
and n detachable collar. When the 
owner Is asleep the blanket cape per- 
forms Its primal functions of keeping 
the sleeper warm, and nothing more. 
When he nwnkens he removes n cir- 
cular hit of cloth buttoned to the mid- 
dle of the blanket and unbuttons a 
silt about n foot long that starts at 
the hole. This gives him plenty of 
room In which to insert his head. A 
Napoleonic storm collar Is then at- 
tached to the hole collar and the two 
lies that fall over the arms are con- 
nected Into sleeves by concealed but- 
tons. And there he stnnds. In a snmrt- 
looklng poncho that gives him lots of 
room to get into his pockets and keeps 
away the cold also! It can be any col- 
or or any cloth the wearer chooses, 
but these details are left for the author 
of "What the Men Wear" to have a lit- 
tle fun with. 


Stamps of 1918. 

"Another year comes to a close with 
far more than 500 new postage stamps 
having been Issued." writes Kent B. 
Stiles In Ids department, "Stamps," In 
Boys’ Life. “The chronicle nt this 
writing shows n total of 511 vnrietles. 
but It will be several months yet be- 
fore American collectors can gain In- 
formation regarding many issues re- 
ported abroad, so that the record for 
1918 may tell of ns many ns 000. In 
1917 there were 990 varieties. 

“These 511 varieties were put forth 
by nations nnd their possessions — such 
as Islands, protectorates, colonies, de- 
pendencies. occupied territories, etc. — 
to the number of 88 governments. Of 
the 511 varieties 388 were due to the 
war alone. The United States has is- 
sued more than fifty varieties, Includ- 
ing shade and die varieties due to In- 
ferior dyestuffs and to worn plates, 
but the British empire leads the list 
with nearly 200 varieties." 


Mexico Market for Tractor*. 

In the fiscal year 1918 the United 
States shipped almost as many trac- 
tors to Mexico us to all other Latin-' 
American countries, Mexico’s share 
lacking only 34 of the combined total 
of the others. The leading position ot 
this neighboring country In our export 
trade in tractors Is due to the uctlon 
of the Mexican government in stimu- 
lating agriculture by exempting farm- 
ing Implements from Import dqty, and 
even by importing such machinery for 
sale ut cost to Mexican fanners. 


Makes Money From Muskrat*. 

By trupplng muskrats on his farm 
neur Prime Hook Neck, Del,, Harry B. 
Roach has made enough to pay for his 
farm and will huve some money left to 
help put it under cultivation, lie gets 
$1.35 for black hides, 88 cents for red 
ones aud 10 cents euch for the incut. 
He has made more than $1,100. 


United States Food Administration No. 0-0^61 

E. E. GRAY CO. 


Newtonville 
West Newton 


Newton Highland* 
Newton Upper Falls 
Newton Centre 


33% Saved on Groceries 

CUTS FOR WEEK COMMENCING JUNE 23 

FLOUR, Premium Brand, barrel $14.95 

(No better Flour milled) y 8 barrel sack 1.83 

PUFFED WHEAT, pkg. 13c 

SELF RISING FLOUR, “Golden Gate” 5 tb bag 48c 

BAKED BEANS, Grayco Brand, Maine pack, 

No. 2 can, 2 for 25c 

MOLASSES, Fancy New Orleans, Grayco Brand, 

L No. 5 can 55c 

SALMON, Fancy Red Alaska, tall can 28c 

HIRES’ ROOT BEER EXTRACT, bottle 18c 

DRIED SLICED BEEF, Red Crown Brand, jar 24c 

COFFEE, M. & J. Brand, per lb 37c 

(A blend of South American Coffees) 

CRAB MEAT, Fancy Japanese, can 37c 

BEETS, Fancy Cut, Grayco Brand, No. 3 can 18c 

CONDENSED MILK, International Brand, 1 can 17c 

LUNCH TONGUE, Majestic Brand, No. 1 can 40c 

PEANUT BUTTER, Grayco Brand, 6 ounce jar 14c 

16 ounce jar 25c 


LUDWIG FURS 



NEW MODELS FOR FALL AND WINTER OF 1919 
NOW READY 


Maternity 
Gowns 

Skirts 

Smocks 
Petticoats 

' FULL LINE 

Summer Dresses 

Maternity Corsets, 
Brassieres, Ruffles 

Miss Creed 

7 Temple Place, Doston 



Oriental 
Tea Company 

85-87 Court Street, Scollay Sq. 
BOSTON 

“Sign of Big Gold Tea Kettle” 
NOTED FOR ITS 

Quality COFFEES 
Quality TEAS 

Only Exclusive Tea and Coffee 
House in New England 

50 Years In the Same Location 

Our Teas and Coffees Are Dependable 

Mull and Telephone orders given 
special attention. 


The School 
Specializing in 
Business Efficiency 

Macdonald 
Commercial School 

Stenography, Typewriting 
and Bookkeeping 
80 Boylston St., Boston 
LITTLE BUILDING 
Tel. Beach 4822 


Children’s Hair Cutting 

Young Women’s Hair “Bobbed” 
Marcel Wave, Shampooing and 
Facial Massage 

Individual attention given by 
experts 

SALONE Dl PIACERE 

Joseph A. Merenda, Prop. 
Formerly with Leading Hair 
Cutting Parlors of Boston 

Room 714 Blake Bldg. 

59 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON 
Tel. Beach 1133 


Miss MacConneil 

Hair Dressing, Face Treatment 
Manicure, Chiropody. Toilet Articles 
Moles, Warts and Superfluous Hair Removed 

429 CENTRE STREET 

Over Hubbard’s Pharmacy 


HIGHEST PRICES 

Paid for bonds, diamonds, emeralds, 
pearls, Jewelry, platinum, old gold and 
silver; Coll. Loan tickets bought and 
loaned on; see us before selling. J. 
ROY, 77 Summer St„ Boston. Itoom 51. 
Est. 16 years; bank ref. 



For 

Table Water 
of 

Delicious 

Purity 

and 

Exceptional 

Softness 


Nobscot Spring Water 


meets all the requirements. A health-giving necessity for 
every day in the year. Bottled and sealed at the spring in 
Framingham, Mass. 

Your Grocer Can Supply You 
If his policy is not to accommodate customers, advise us 
and we will give you names of grocers in your vicinity who 
are accommodating. 

Arrangements may be made to have Nobscot Water de- 
livered also at your summer home. 

Nobscot Mt. Spring Company 

Established 1892 

173 MILK STREET - - . BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone Fort Hill 860 


TIIK NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1019. 


7 



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FAVORS A MEMORIAL BUILDING 

Civic Club ol Newton Discusses War Memorials 
at a Mid-Summer Meeting 


MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL 
ESTATE 


By virtue of the power of sale con- 
tained in a certain mortgage deed 
given by Patrick L. O’Leary to A. 
Alexander Achorn, dated February 
15th, 1901), jnd recorded with Middle- 
sex (So. Dist.) Deeds, Book 3434, Page 
462, for breach of the conditions con- 
tained in said mortgage, and for the 
purpose of foreclosing the same, will 
he sold at public auction, upon the 
premises described in said mortgage, 
on Saturday, June 28th, 1919, at two 
o’clock in the afternoon, all and sin- 
gular the premises described in said 
mortgage, viz.: A certain parcel of 
land with the buildings thereon situ- 
ated in Newton in the County of Mid- 
dlesex and Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts being lot numbered Twenty- 
one on a plan of “Building Lots on 
Walnut Hill. Newton, Mass.,” dated 
July 1906. to be recorded with Middle- 
sex (South District) Deeds and bound- 
ed as follows: — 

Westerly by Walnut Hill Road sev- 
enty-five feet; Northerly by lot num- 
bered Twenty on said plan one hun- 
dred thirty-three and 49-100 feet; 
Easterly by lot numbered Twenty-two 
on said plan seventy-five feet; South- 
erly by Parker Avenue one hundred 
thirty-three and 49-100 feet. Contain- 
ing ninety-nine hundred and eighty 
square feet. Said premises will be 
conveyed subject to the taxes assessed 
as of April 1, 1919, and to municipal 
liens and assessments, if any. 

One hundred dollars will be re- 
quired to be paid in cash by the pur- 
chaser at the time and place of sale; 
other terms at sale. 

A. ALEXANDER ACIIORN, 

Mortgagee. 

18 Tremont St., Boston. 

Rm. 917. 

June 6-13-20. 


MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL 
ESTATE 


By virtue.of the power of sale con- 
tained in a certain mortgage deed 
pfiven by William Dennis Murphy to 
A. Alexander Achorn, dated March 
18th, 1909, and recorded with Middle- 
sex (So. Dist.) Deeds, Book 3432, page 
205, for breach of the conditions con- 
tained in said mortgage, and for the 
purpose of foreclosing the same, will 
he sold at public auction, upon the 
premises described in said mortgage, 
on Saturday. June 28th, 1919, at two- 
thirty o’clock in the afternoon, all 
and singular the premises described 
in said mortgage, viz.: A certain par- 
cel of land with the buildings thereon 
situated in Newton in the County of 
Middlesex and Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts being lot numbered six 
on a “Plan of Building Lots Walnut 
Hill, Newton Mass.” dated July 1906 
to be recorded with Middlesex Deeds, 
bounded as follows: — Westerly by 
Walnut Hill Road one hundred twenty 
and 20-100 feet; Northerly by Boyl- 
ston Street seventy-five feet; easterly 
by lot numbered Five on said Plan 
one hundred twenty and 20-100 feet 
and Southerly by lot numbered Seven 
on said plan seventy-five feet. Con- 
taining eighty-nine hundred and 
eighty-four square feet. Being the 
same premises conveyed to said Wil- 
liam Dennis Murphy by the said A. 
Alexander Achorn ct al by deed dated 
March 18th, 1909. and recorded in said 
deeds and being hereby conveyed to 
gether with the right of drainage and 
subject to the right to maintain drain 
mentioned therein. Said premises 
will be sold subject to the tuxes as- 
sessed as of April 1, 1919, and to 
municipal lfens and assessments, if 
any. 

One hundred dollars will he re- 
quired to he paid in cash by the pur- 
chaser at the time and place of sale; 
other terms at sale. 

A. ALEXANDER ACIIORN, 
Mortgagee. 

18 Tremont St., Boston. 

Rm. 917. 

Juno 6-13-20 


UommonwcAlth of Massachusetts. 
Middlevex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law. next of kin, and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Louis N. Lupien late of 
Newton in said County, deceased. 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will and tes- 
tament of said deceased has been pre- 
sented to said Court, for Probate, by 
Clara E. Lupien who prays that letters 
testamentary may be issued to her, 
the executrix therein named, without 
giving a surety on her official bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, on 
the twenty-fifth day of June A. D. 
1919, at nine o’clock in the forenoon, 
to show cause, if any you have, why 
the same should not be granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby di- 
rected to give public notice thereof, 
by publishing this citation once in 
each week for three successive weeks, 
in the Newton Graphic a newspaper 
published in Newton the last publi- 
cation to be one day, at least, before 
said Court, and by mailing postpaid, 
or deliveri lg a copy of this citation to 
all known persons interested in the 
estate, seven days at least before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles .1. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
third day of June in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

June 6-13-20 


MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF 
REAL ESTATE 


Under and by virtue of the power of 
rale contained in a certain mortgage 
of real estate given by Earle R. Haynes 
t nd Mary A. Haynes, his wife, in her 
light, both of Boston, Suffolk County, 
Massachusetts to Henry J. O’Meara 
and John J. McCarthy, as they are 
Trustees of the Bay State Development 
Company, acting under a declaration of 
trust dated June 28. 1916. and recorded 
with Middlesex South District Deeds, 
Book 4064. Page 163, dated April 30, 
’917. and recorded with Middlesex 
South District Deeds, Book 4132, Page 
234, for breach of the condition of said 
mortgage, and for the purpose of fore- 
closing the same, will he sold at public 
• notion on the premises on Saturday, 
.'uly 5, 1919, at 9.15 o’clock in the 
morning, the real estate described in 
•aid mortgage, to wit: 

“The land in Newton, Middlesex 
County, Massachusetts, with the build- 
ings tiiereon, being shown as Lot Thir- 
ty (30) on a plan entitled "Greenwold, 
Bay' State Development Co.. Newton, 
Mass., July 1, 1916, Charles A. McMan- 
us, C. E. revised December 12, 1916”, 
recorded with Middlesex South District 
Deeds. Plan Book 256. Plan 13, bound- 
ed and described as follows; — 

Southwesterly by Pricilla Road, Sev- 
enty three and 2-10 (73.2) feet; 

Northwesterly by Lot No. 31 on said 
dan. One hundred nine and 9-10 
(109.9) feet; 

Northeasterly by Lot No. 3 on said 
plan, Seventy-five and 4-10 (75.4) feet; 
and 

Southeasterly by Lot No. 29 on said 
plan. One hundred twelve and 7-10 
(112.7) feet. 

Containing 8268 square feet, be any 
or all of said contents or measure- 
ments more or less.” 

Said premises will be sold subject 
to restrictions of record so far as now 
n force and applicable. 

Said premises will also be sold 
■subject to all unpaid taxes, tax titles, 
municipal liens and assessments, if 
any. Two hundred dollars ($200) re- 
quired at sale. 

HENRY J. O’MEARA and JOHN J. 

McCarthy, Trustees of the Bay 

State Development Co., Mortgagees. 

For further particulars apply either 
to the Mortgagees, or to Swain, Car- 
penter & Nay, Attorneys for the Mort- 
gagees, Rooms 1111 1117 Paddock 
Building. 101 Tremont street, Boston, 
Mass. 

June 13-20-27. 


At a mooting of the Civic Club ol i 
Newton, held Tuesday, June 10. at the 
Ni wton Club a War Memorial in the 
h : po of some kind of a building wuh 
endorsed. This action was taken after 
a long discussion opened by Mr. Harry 
J. Carbon of Newton Centre and Mr. 
Everett E. Kent of the School Com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Carlson said that the idea of 
War Memorials was not new as it goes 
hack to the times of the Romans. But 
modern times are not like the old 
times. This is the era of democracy, 
the (Fawn of a new day. We need to stop 
and think socially, economically, re- 
ligiously and in every way, so let us 
stop and think carefully of this prob- 
lem of a memorial that is to endure 
lfter we are gone, is to be as good or 
bettor than as when produced, and that 
is to wortlrly remember those who 
fought and those who died in this great 
war. What are to he the results of 
this war? What have all these deaths 
brought us? Are there to be new 
lrngs on this earth or are we to sit 
r.omplucently and be orthodox? 

Surely in democracy there is a 
change. Surely in labor there is an 
wnkonlng. Surely in education there 
's to he a change for with 700,000 illi- 
terates in our first draft we 
can scarcely imagine a more 
fitting memorial than the education 
of these 700,000 and their fami- 
lies. Surely there is to he a new devel- 
opment in world business. And surely 
a great and glorious development of 
science. And is It too much to hope 
that out of it will come new Influences 
in art. new theorems that will not com- 
pel us to fall back on the threadbare 
memorials of the Romans, the arch 
"nd the column. 

But to understand these things we 
must go slowly, and in this we may 
learn from the past. 

In Oct. of 1781, the sleeping city of 
Philadelphia were awakened by the 
watchman. “Past 2 o’clock and Corn- 
wallis is taken.” This virtually ended 
lie Revolution but the corner stone of 
ihe Washington Monument was not 
laid until 1848. 

Lincoln signed the most important 
document ever penned by a President 
of the U. S. in Sept., 1862 (the Eman- 
cipation Proclamation) and we are 
just now in 1919 finishing a fitting 
memorial to the cause and war that 
Lincoln embodied. 

What was true of the great monu- 
ments was true of the smaller. The 
Lion of Lucerne was executed in 1821, 
hut the event it commemorated took 
place in 1792. 

The choice of subject should not be 
made by architects alone or by any 
other one class, except representative 
citizens, men with no axes to grind, 
no friends to advance, no material to 
sell, all with one simple thought in 
mind, How can we best create a fitting 
memorial of those who fought and died 
in this great war. 

I would put men upon it that can 
think, men who are always weighing 
nd balancing like our most excellent 
judges. I would have men who have 
achieved in business, and whose hearts 
are still warm for their fellow man. 

Finally the best of our men interest- 
ed in the fine arts, but only if they are 
also interested as citizens and not 
as job getters. 

This committee to examine sugges- 
tions, to originate ideas, and to finally 
report, one year from now or sooner 
if possible, but not to he hurried. The 
best never comes with haste. Then if 
the answer is a constructed structure 
or monument, then comes the very dif- 
ficult matter of the choice of the de- 
rigner. The most pushing are not al- 
ways the ablest. The most retiring are 
often the men we want. After the civil 
war we wanted sculpture and for 20 
years we had no sculptors, but we at- 
tempted war sculpture. All the same 
with disastrous results. It may be 
that you will find two solutions to your 
minds well balanced. Then the possi- 
bility of obtaining a master mind, to 
design (he one and the impossiblity of 
getting anything but mediocrity to de- 
sign the other would be a deciding 
factor. 

Having made your choice you should 
pay the designer amply, and should 
give him all the time he wants. So 
far I have only discussed the monu- 
ment. Equally important is the site. 
The committee that cannot find an 
adequate site for a perfect monument 
has not even half solved its problem. 

If it is to take a long, time to create 
a real Newton monument, it might 
be possible to put. now, in each village 
green a beautiful ttugstuff with sculp- 
tured bronze base Inscriptions and 
names to keep alive the thought until 
the real monument was designed and 
built. 

We have started a Park from Rox- 
bury region to the C'harles River and 
at present it has ended ingloriously at 
Beacon street. Chestnut Hill. This 
might he continued and the Parkway 
embellished with suitable war memor- 
ials such as was done too obviously in 
Boston. We might build a memorial 
hospital, where the veterans would 
have special privileges but. 

Carr Gilbert says, “the most impress- 
ive monument is one which appeals to 
the imagination alone, which rests not 
upon its idealism. From such monu- 
ments (low the impulse for greut and 
heroic action, for devotion to duty and 
for love of country.” 

Let us hesitate about advocating a 
building with utilitarian adjuncts 
whose latter days may find the uses 
out of touch with its community, its 
activities obsolete and not even com- 
manding respect. 

If I huve made you see the difficul- 
ties and made you willing to go slowly, 
then I am satisfied that a real start 
bus {teen made. Let us have patience 
and let us have faith tliut when we 
have found the one super Idea that 
just as surely we will find the means 
to carry It out. 

Mr. Kent Huid in part; 

Our memoriul is to be the gift of the 
present people, and the present com- 
munity. If a later age Is to give ulso, 
that may he well; but It will not be the 
gift of the community from which the 
sons and neighbors went forth. The 
memorial must he made with such re- 
sources of judgment, taste and art as 
the present community can command. 
It must be done while the shadow of 


this war 13 nt ill ro near that our tre 
rnendoualy forgetful American public 
till feel in the spirit of giving; ho that 
It can be tin* gift of practically all the 
people. A distinction can In* made be- 
tween the time necessary for taking 
popular sentiment at Its flood tide, for 
ubrcriptlon purposes, and the ample 
time which may he required for a prop- 
erly artistic execut ion of the com mis 
slon. 

The danger that if we. choose some 
good thing now for a memorial we may 
regret it because within the next few 
years sortie other good thing may he 
n vented wh’ch we should wish to give 
is really trifling. 

Attacking our present problem to 
discover to what the present memorial 
hould relate, we may consider that it 
is to he a record of our reverence, pri- 
marily for the men who died, hut also 
for those who went, and so showed 
:hoir willingness to die. I believe that 
ill such should he named. There was, 
however, a new and notable feature 
distinguishing this war from others in 
‘lie wonderful organization of the men 
and women at home in support of those 
who were sent. Analyzing it in an 
other way, there are to be commemo- 
rated first, the physical side of man- 
hood, because, after all, war is a physi- 
cal struggle, and it was physical en- 
durance and power that sustained our 
men and carried them to victory; sec- 
ond, the ethical side, manifest in the 
spirit of service; and third, the politi- 
cal side, manifest in the civic and pa- 
triotic morale in support of democracy 
and the equal opportunity of the in- 
dividual. We reflect on the physical 
side that this is not a memorial to the 
47.3 per cent, of men in the draft be 
tween the ages of 21 and 31 who were 
rejected as physically unfit, nor. as 
Captain Cormerais has quoted, the four 
rejected out of each five considered for 
our own Company C; but it is a mem- 
orial to the physically fit. How better 
can they he honored than by institut- 
ng new proceedings which shall make 
others to be like them; which shall 
tend to maintain that kind of life 
whose value they have proved? On 
’he ethical side, remembering that the 
;pirit of service which is to he com- 
memorated is non-sectarian, non-politi- 
cal, non class, and that in it the women 
have numerously taken a great and 
organized part, is it not fitting to take 
measures which shall help continue for 
our community the organized altruis- 
tic ideals and activities which were 
called into being in many citizens by 
this war? And in the third aspect, 
how can the civic and patriotic morale 
which is essential to a successful de- 
mocracy he maintained for the future 
better than through the instrumental- 
ity of organized physical play? This 
also offers n solution of our problem 
of Americanization, for in mingling in 
the equal practice and contests of bod- 
ies and wits in various physical games, 
the aristocrat and the proletariat and 
'he immigrant learn mutual respect, 
find rewards for individual effort com- 
parable to those In the larger life of a 
democracy, and learn fair play and the 
necessity for cooperation, which the 
race as a whole has learned and is 
learning only by centuries of toil. 

Our analysis then leads us to com- 
memorating the men and the issues of 
the war by conceiving some form of 
memorial which shall first contain 
•oine purely idealistic memorial feat- 
ure, whether it he a tower or a portico, 
or an arch, or approach, or interior 
brine, with the names of the men who 
lied and the others who went into 
service. Next, it should constitute 
mme means of perpetuating in a living 
way our respect and approval for the 
Physical, the ethical and the political 
elements and issues of the war. chosen 
and expressed in the spirit of the 
times; and the be’st way of doing this 
appears to be by providing, in connec- 
tion with the idealistic feature, a large 
hall, and surrounding rooms and facili- 
ties, which may serve as a place of 
physical and moral training, a civic 
auditorium, and headquarters for the 
organized non-partisan, voluntary wel- 
fare work of the City. 

There was a general discussion of 
Hie subject in which Messrs. S. H. 
Whidden, Henry I. Harrinian, Arthur 
Kendrick. Joseph B. Jamieson and Wil- 
liam Price participated. 

It was the sense of those present 
that the Memorial should be in the 
hane of a building of some kind. 

The Club also voted to express Its 
appreciation and commendation of the 
<ction of tin* Newton representatives 
and the Senators from this district in 
opposing the hill to increase salaries 
of members of the Legislature. 

A social hour followed the meeting. 


REAL ESTATE 


John T. Burns & Sons, Inc., report 
that they huve sold for the Wildey 
Savings Bank the frame ten room col- 
onial house situated at 83 Fairmouut 
avenue, Newton. With the house 
there are 16.S00 square feet of land 
and the total assessment is $9500. 
Rev. Newton Merritt, Jr., purchases 
for a home and after extensive im- 
provements will occupy. 

The same concern report that they 
have sold for H. C. Bourne his new 
colonial eight room home situated on 
Mill street. Newtonville. D. R. Lunt 
was the purchaser. The property 
which is new is not yet assessed but 
is valued ut $12,000. 

John T. Burns & Sons, Inc., also 
report that they have sold for Costello 
C. Converse his frame twelve-room 
home situated at 150 Hunnewell ave- 
nue, Newton. With the house there 
are 15,000 feet of lund and the totul 
assessment on sume Is $15,000. L. M. 
Patten was the purchaser. 

The above agency report having 
sold for Henrietta P. Clare to Joseph 
T. McCarthy the two-fauiily frame 
house with 4500 feet of land at S3 
Brookside avenue, Newtonville. The 
total valuation of the same is $7500. 
Mr. McCarthy will occupy one suite. 

The Burns agency also have sold the 
Angler estate situated at 53 Wuhan 
park, Newton, consisting of a twelve- 
room frame house together with 12,000 
feet of lund. Margaret II. Watters 
purchases for a home. The assessed 
value of the sume Is $5400. 


Demonstration Home Garden 

This i.i the month when the insect 
peits hatched out by the wa r in weath- 
er begin to do so much damage. A 
number of th in are already at work 
in the home g miens. Constant watch 
is necessary in order to control these 
p *sts for they frequently do much 
damage to young plants before being 
dii eo/iTod. 

Aphids or plant lice are fond of all 
garden vegetables hut do most dam- 
age to peas, cabbages, potatoes and to 
matoes. They are a sucking Insect 
and cannot lie controlled by the use 
of arsenical poisons or fungicides. 
They must he killed by some material 
that causes death by suffocation or by 
burning by contact. Forty percent 
nicotine sulphate is the best spray for 
plant lice. It is known commercially 
as ” Black Leaf 40”. It may he used 
with some other spray material if de- 
sired hut when used alone soap should 
always he added to spread the mix- 
ture. Use 1 1-2 teaspoonfuls of “Black 
Leaf 40” and 1 cubic inch of common 
laundry soap to one gallon of water. 
Spray the plants for lice frequently. 

('utworms are raising havoc this 
year where no means have been taken 
to combat them. When setting out a 
few tomato plants, cabbage plants or 
the like, place a small paper collar 
around the stem of tin* plant to pre- 
vent the cutworms from reaching the 
stein and severing it. Another suc- 
cessful method is to sprinkle poison 
bait around the plants in the evening. 
Poison bait is made by mixing to- 
gether 1 quart of bran, I ounce of 
white arsenic or Paris green, 3 pints 
of water and 1 pint of molasses. A 
little lemon juice added to the mixture 
will help in attracting the cutworms. 

Cabbage root maggots have been 
most destructive this year. The only 
means of control for these pests is to 
place a tarred paper disc around the 
stem of each cabbage plant when it is 
set out. It should fit tightly so as to 
prevent the cabbage maggot fly from 
getting down into the soil near the 
stem where they lay their eggs. Cab- 
bage plants that have been destroyed 
by the root maggot should be pulled 
up and burned. 

In a great many gardens this year 
the cabbage root maggot has attacked 
the radish crop causing the radishes 
to wilt and die. There is no method 
of control worth while for these mag- 
gots on the radish crop. 

Cabbage worms are another serious 
pe3t. When you find large holes eaten 
in the cabbage leaves, examine the 
plant carefully and remove the velvety 
green worms. Also crush the yellow 
*gg clusters that may be found on the 
under side of the leaves. Any gritty 
material such as roadside dust, dry 
garden loam, finely sifted ashes or 
lime when sprinkled over the leaves 
will help to control the worm. Ar- 
senate of lead spray can be applied 
with safety to the young plants as the 
leaves that receive the spray will be 
the loose outer leaves of the cabbage 
and will be removed before eating. 

Flea beetles attack potatoes, toma- 
toes and egg plants principally and 
cause greut damage to the plant by 
perforating the leaves thus causing 
entry for blight. Bean leaf beetles 
which are similar to the flea beetles 
also damage the bean crop by eatin; 
holes in the leaves. These small 
block beetles are not serious, however 
for they can easily he controlled by 
an application of Bordeaux mixture 
and arsenate of lead which should be 
applied about every 10 days. 

Squash bugs are controlled by trap- 
ping. Place a piece of shingle or 
imall chip of wood near the plant. 
The bugs will hide underneath this 
covering at night and can be removed 
iurly the next morning. 

Many people are having trouble this 
spring with the grape plume-motli. 
This insect is a white fuzzy caterpillar 
that prevents the growth of the new 
canes by wrapping up the leaves .on 
the end. Open up the leaves and kill 
the insect. Spraying is not practical 
us the new leaves grow so fast It 
would have to be done every few days 


NEW NEWTON CORPORATION 


Papers of Incorporation have been 
issued at the State House. Boston, for 
a new corporation, to be known as 
John J. Forsythe. Inc., of Newton. 
Mass. The business of the new cor- 
poration will be that of Automobile 
Painting and Trimming. The shop 
will be located in the building 
of the Crawford Garage and Taxi 
Service. Inc., 49 Elmwood Street, 
Newton, as will also the office. Ma- 
chinery of the most modern type, anil 
all of the latest and most modern 
equipment have been purchased and 
is being installed. Alterations in the 
building are also being planned, and 
the enterprise will give to the public 
of Newton and vicinity a thoroughly 
up-to-date Auto Paint Shop, where 
only expert painters and trimmers 
will he employed. The officers of the 
corporation are: President, John J. 
Forsythe; Treasurer, Fred. L. Craw- 
ford; Secretary, R. J. Montgomery. 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex. >s. 

PROBATE COURT. 

To the heirs-at-law, next of kin. cred- 
itors, and all other persons inter- 
ested in the estate of Harriet A. 
Lockett late of Newton in said 
County, deceased, intestate. 
WHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration on the estate of said 
deceased to Joseph F. Lockett of New- 
ton in the County of Middlesex, with- 
out giving a surety on his bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge. in said County of Middlesex, 
on the seventh day of July A.D. 1919. 
ut uino o'clock in the forenoon, to 
show cause if any you have, why the 
same should not be granted. 

And the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic u newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the last publication 
to he one day, ut least, before said 
Court. 

Witness. Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
thirteenth day of June in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and nineteen 
F. M. ESTY, Register. 
June 20-37-July 4. 


I.I. NVivtou North i 1 72-.M Knlul.llnlu-il ltMMI 

Sam Bloom, Custom Tailor 

3 jits (tadi T o Order, Cleansing. Pressing and Repairing at Moderate Price. 

Pur Munioiiellnu n Speclulty 
Work Ckllrd For miiiI D«41v«red Contra** rrc»«ln« 

307 Centre Street, opp. Post Office Newton 


THE LOMBARDY INN 

. BOSTON' 

DANCING ALL EVENING 

BoyUton Place, near Colonial Theatre 

Telephone* Beach 2941-2942 
Wine Service Open Till Mldntuhi 

LOMBARDY BY-THE-SEAm,;.’,-,";!^ 

NORTH SC1TUATE BEACH OPENS JUNE 15th 




CLEANSING 


At Its 


BEST 


AT 


LEWANDOS 

AMERICAS GREATEST 

CLEANSERS DYERS 

LAUNDERERS 

Packages Called For and Delivered in the Newtons from Watertown Shop at Works 

Telephone 300 Newton North 

“You Can Rely on Lewandos” 

Boston New York Philadelphia 


MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF 
REAL ESTATE 


Coninioinvealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


Under and by virtue of the power of 
sale contained in a certain mortgage To the heirs-at-law, next of kin, rred- 


of real estate given by Walter I 
Haynes and Jessie R. Haynes, his 
wife, in her right, both of Boston. 
Suffolk County, Massachusetts, to 
Henry J. O’Meara and John J. Mc- 
Carthy, as they are Trustees of the 
Bay State Development Company, act- 
ing under a Declaration of Trust 


itors. and all other persons inter- 
ested in the estate of Mary Sheehan 
late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. intestate. 

WHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration on the estate of said 
deceased to John J. Sheehan of New- 


dated June 28. 1916. recorded with lon in the County of Middlesex, with- 

- out giving a surety on his bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court to be he'd at Cam- 
bridge, in said County of Middlesex, 
on the twenty-sixth day of June A. D. 
1919. at nine o’clock in the forenoon, 
to show cause if any you have, why 
the same should not be granted. 

And the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper 
publishd in Newton the last publica- 
tion to be one day, at least, before said 
Court. 

Witness. Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
mirth day of June in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY. Register. 

June 6-13-20 


Middlesex South District Deeds, Book 
4064. Page 163. dated April 30. 1917. 
and recorded with Middlesex South 
District Deeds, Book 4132. Page 231. 
for breach of the condition of said 
mortgage, and for the purpose of fore- 
closing the same, will be sold at pub- 
lic auction on the premises on Satur- 
day, July 5, 1919, at Nine o’clock in 
the morning, the real estate described 
in said mortgage, to wit: 

"The land in Newton, Middlesex 
County. Massachusetts, with the build- 
ings thereon, being shown as Lot 
Twenty-seven (27) on a plan entitled 
“Greenwold. Bay State Development 
Co., Newton. Mass.. July 1, 1916. 

Charles A. McManus, C. E., revised 
December 12. 1916 ”, recorded with 
Middlesex South District Deeds. Book 
of Plans No. 256. Plan 13, bounded and 
described as follows: — 

Westerly by Mayflower Road, Fifty- 
nine and 3-10 (59.3) feet; 

Northerly by Lot No. 2S on said 
plan. One hundred nine and 9-10 
(109.9) feet; 

Easterly by Lots Nos. 7 and S on 
said plan. Eighty-five and 5-10 (85.5) 
feet; and 

Southerly by Lot No. 26 on said 
plan, Ninety-six and 5-10 (96.5) feet. 

Containing 7725.8 square feet, be 
any or all of said contents or meas- 
urements more or less.” 

Said premises wnr be sold subject 
io restrictions of record so far as now 
in force and applicable. 

Said premises will also be sold sub- 
ject to all unpaid taxes, tax titles, 
municipal liens and assessments, if 
any. Two hundred dollars ($200) re- 
quired at sale. 

HENRY J. O’MEARA and JOHN J. 
McCarthy. TRS. of the Bay State 

Development Co.. Mortgagees. 

For further particulars apply either 
to the Mortgagees or to Swain, Car- 
penter & Nay, Attorneys for the Mort- 
gagees. Rooms 1111-1117 Paddock 
Building. 101 Tremont Street, Boston. 
Mass. 

June 13-20-27. 


Uo;uni<mnralth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


| To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Julia Sullivan late of New- 
ton in said County, deceased. 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
; purporting to he the last will and tes- 
j tament of said deceased has been pre- 
I sented to said Court, for Probate, by 
j Patrick C. Cotter who prays that let- 
j ters testamentary may be issued to 
1 him. the executor therein named, with- 
out giving a surety on his official 
| bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, on 
the twenty-third day of June A. D 
1919. at nine o’clock in the forenoon, 
to show cause, if any you have, why 
the same should not be granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby di- 
• reeled to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
I the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
i shed in Newton the last publication to 
i* '»ne day. at least, before said Court, 
1 and bv mailing postpaid, or delivering 

1 a copy of this citation to all known 

By virtue of a power of sale con- ! I’ rsons interested in the estate, seven 

tallied in a mortgage deed from George a ’\;, at ‘ ea ^ before said Court. 

C. Olson to the Fitchburg Co-operative fitness, (buries .1. Mclntlre, Ls- 
Bank. dated September 5. 191S. and h Illd S e o{ said c <*rt. this 

noted on Transfer Certificate of title 1 went ieth day of May in the year one 

No. 914S. Book 61 Page 577 of the Land : thousand nine hundred and nineteen. 

Court Records of the Middlesex South , ^ ^ EST\, Register. 

District Registry of Deeds, said rnort j ' line °~ t3--0 _____ 

gage being filed with said Records as .. .. . „ . 

Document No. 2500S. and for breach of '° Uc ® l> , l,ei * by thut . 

the condition of said mortgage deed, subscriber has been duly appointed 
;ind for the purpose of foreclosing the execu ^ rix the will of Albert A. Sav- 
same. will be sold at public auction on of . New ^ * n County of 

the premises hereinafter described on ldd * e8ex> d *“ cea » ed . testate, and has 

Saturday. July 5. 1919. at three o’clock take l u upon h * rs « lf that trust by giv- 
in the afternoon, all and singular the 1Il S bond, as the law directs, 
real estate conveyed by said mortgage . A11 persons having demands upon 
deed, viz: A certain tract of land with j j 
the buildings thereon, situated in New- 
ton. Middlesex County. Massachusetts. I 1 


MORTGAGEE’S SALE 
RE VI ESTAT] 


OF 


the estate of said deceased are hereby 
required to exhibit the same; and all 
persons indebted to said estate are 

and bounded northerly by Rogers I i ll,ed upo “ 1 p * y “ e “ t J „ 
Street 3S.59 feet; northeasterly by CORNELIA M. tsAAAGE. 

land now or formerly of Josiah J. Executrix. 

White 131.20 feet: southerly by lot No. 

13 B on the plan hereinafter mentioned I 
121.29 feet: and westerly by lot No. 14 
on said plan 101. S4 feet. Said parcel ; M ,ru X5 *if* 
is shown as lot 13 A on said plan. All ' ' une 

°t »id bound. t shown on a Notice la hereby when, that 2 

subdivision plan as approved by .he ...bseriber has been duly appointed 

rnnrt f i 1 . . . 1 in t lisi <\r I n.x T i n .1 ... 


(Address) 

Brooks Ave.. 
Newtonville, Mass. 


Court, filed in the office of the Land , 


administrator of the estate of Hannah 



The premises will be sold subject to tllte l)( saW accessed are required to 


aav unpaid taxes or assessments ,. x | Ul ,it the same; and all persons in- 
Pe rnis : $ 1.00 cash at the time and place | debted to said estate are called upon 
Of sale and balance within ten days make pavnlem tl> 
thereafter at the banking rooms of the JOHN SULLIVAN \dm 

mortgagee on delivery of deed. Address) * ' ' 

r'lTCimilRO fOOl'KRATIVE HANK 44 variant Ave.. 

u , a ... „ M k ° 1 r ‘**S # - Lowell, Mass. 

By John W. Parshley . Treats f 

Fitchburg. Sluss.. June 10, 1919. 


June 13-20-27. 


Route 3. 

I May 20. 1919. 


June 13-20-27 




I 


TIIE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1010. 


m 

E 1 


nmwijjr y^gJi 

mmmm 


GINGER *\JLE 

‘Don’t forget to send up a case of Ginger 
Ale. and it MUST be While House.*’ 

For tl»p worm •qirlni: «loyo nt lmn«l. no «lrlnk 1* a* 
rrfrrwlilnir nnd (mtlwfylnx an White llntnic Pure Oln*er 
Ale. 

Mnko It a point to have a supply of this delightful 
drink on hand all the time. Pleasing combinations 
with orange, lemon or grape Juice will add to enjoy- 
ment of any lunch. 

White House Pure Ginger Ale Is the drink you can 
always serve with confidence and pride. 

Our own Motor Delivery 
Service operates for the 
convenience of dealers. A _ 
call to Be««h 333 will |J \ \ J\1 ^ 

bring your supply promptly 

WHITE HOUSE GINGER ALE 

Standard Bottling & Extract Co. 

*3 Harvard Street Boston 

Bottlers of Quality Orangeade. Sarsaparilla, Root Beer 
and other "oft drinks 


ORDER IT 


Boston Elevated Railway Co. 

SURFACE BINES 
Subject to Change Without Notice 
WATERTOWN STATION TO CENTRAL 
Stj. (Cambridge Subway) — Via Arsenal 
St 5 fl* -,.22. 5.37, 6.52, 6.00. 7. 8. and 

5 min. to 8.57 A. M.. and every 16 min. to 
4.07. 7 and s min. to 4.30. every 5 min. 
to •: 22. every 15 min. to 11.52 P. M., 12.08 
A M. SUNDAY 6.25. 20 min. to 8.05 A. 
M.. and each 15 minutes to 11.52,, 12.08 
A. M. 

WATERTOWN STATION TO NORTH 
CAMBRIDGE (Via Harvard Sq.>— -5.04. 
5.30. 5.46. 5.56. 6.06. 6.15. 6.22. 6.30 6.39 

6 47. 6.55. 7.03. 7.11. 7.17 A M . and each 

5 and 6 min. to 1 1.39. 1 1.46. 1 1.5.3. 1 1.59 
P M . 12.05. 12 14. 12.24. 12.30. 12.51, 12.57. 
I 22 A M. SUNDAY 5.30. 6.06, each 15 
minutes to 7.06. 7.17. 7.32. 7.47. 8.01, 8.16. 
v 25. and each 7 und 8 min. to 11.54 A. M., 
every 6 min. to 11.00 P. M., 7 and 8 min. 
to 11.30. 1 1 39. 11.47, 11.63. 12.05, 12.14, 

12.24. 12.30, 12.51, 12.57. 1.22 night. 

NIGHT AND EARLY MORNING SERVICE. 
Newton to Adams Sq. and Dudley St., via 



QUAUTY- DURABILITY- ECONOMY 


THE WEST NEWTON MUSIC SCHOOL 

A Review ol Ils Eighth Season and Statement ol 
Its Purposes and Results 





New York’s 
Most Artistic Designer 

y ^ Of 

'Jyf Coats, Wraps, 

Street and Evening Gowns 

WEDDING GOWNS A SPECIALTY 

419 Boylston St., Boston Enter 399 Boylston St., Room 325 
Phone B. B. 7120 


Painting, Paper Hanging 

c ^ci!n* y Db8£Ib and Aucoin 

Telephone Day or Night 1077-W North 


TKACHERM 


Ml Auburn (by transfer at Harvard Sq.) 
12 12. 1.41. 2.41. 3.41. 4. tt A. M. Return 
take Harvard Sq. car leaving Adams Sq. 

1 2 35. 1 05. 1.35. 2.35. 3.33. 4.35 A. M. 

Take Harvard Sq. car at Dudley St.. 1.39. 

2 39. 3 .39. 4.39 

CAMBRIDGE SUBWAY TRAINS. From 
Harvard Sq.. 5.24 A. M.. to 11.51 night. 
From Broadway, 5.34 A. M.. to 11.54 night. 
SUNDAY. 6.04 A. M.. to 11.54 night. 

May 17. 1919. 

EDWARD DANA, 
Supt. of Transportation. 


Commonwealth of Massaelinells. 
Middlesex, ss, 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin, cred- 
itors, and all other persons inter- 
ested in the estate of Edgar Francis 
Eames late of Newton in said Coun- 
tv. deceased, intestate. 

WHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration on the estate of said 
deceased to Elbridge John Eames of 
Newton in the County of Middlesex, 
without giving a surety on his bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge. in said County of Middlesex, 
on the twenty- third day of June A. D. 
1919 at nine, o’clock in the forenoon, 
to show cause if any you have, why 
the same should not be granted. 

And the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the last publication 
to be one day, at least, before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Me Intire, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
second day of June in the year one 
thousand nine hundrad and nineteen. 

F M. ESTY, Register. 

June 6-13-20. 

Commonwealth ol’ Massaeliusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 

To the heirs-at-law. next of kin and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Abby Temple Poole late 
of Newton in said County, deceased 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will and tes- 
tament of said deceased has been pre- 
sented to said Court, for Probate, by 
Norman Farquhar who prays that let- 
ters testamentary may be issued to 
him. the executor therein named, 
without giving a surety on his official 
bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, on 
the thirtieth day of June A. 1). 1919, 
at nine o’clock in the forenoon, to 
show cause, if any you have, why the 


It’a lime to think about 
protection for your House, 
also its sppearance. AsU 
us about the above line of 
Paint, Stain], etc. 

Chandler & Barber Co. 

124 Summer St., Boston 


AUCTION 

SALES 

We held fifteen Auction Sales 
last Year — every one being suc- 
cessful — a record no other Auc- 
tioneer in this community can 
claim. 

Let Us Sell Your Real Estate 
at Auction. 

J. EDWARD GALLANAN 

Real Estate Broker and 
Auctioneer 

271 WASHINGTON STREET 
NEWTON 



INSURE 

your 


FURNITURE 

with 

ROWE & PORTER 

(Sidney R. Porter) 

100 MILK STREET, BOSTON 
Tel. Main 7530 


The West Newton Music School nt 
the close of its eighth season, ‘an- 
nounces the following: 

Special Honorable Mention for 
faithful work and good progress: 
Mary Pucciarelli, Gertrude Walsh and 
Joseph Deffely, Violin; Teresa Caru- 
so. Pi’.ino; Dorothy Greeley. Voice. 

Honorable mention is given to Ar- 
thur Rloomendule, Harold McNeill 
and Francis Parker, Violin. 

Seven pupils of the Music School 
have this year studied for nnd re- 
ceived High School ‘‘credits’’ for niu- 
Vc. and several more who are now 
uterlng High School will study for 
thes- “credits," receiving from 10 to 
20 points towards their diplomas, ac- 
cording to the time given to music 
and the seriousness of their study. 

The usual recitals have been given 
nt the Peirce School Assembly Hall. 
At these recitals the ensemble work 
of the Violin Department, under Julia 
Pickard Stoessol, has shown great 
progress and is an increasing attrac- 
tion. Beginning in the first years of 
the School with groups of three or 
four (usually very tiny) players, nnd 
with simplest folk-song arrangements, 
this ensemble work lias arrived at 
the time when it can begin to call 
itself "The Orchestra" — though still 
depending for its wind instruments 
on friendly adult organizations, which 
help out on special occasions. There 
is a weekly rehearsal, at which mu- 
sic by the great masters, as well as 
lighter music, is studied, and "The 
O.chestra” is prepared for the many 
calls which come to it "for the benefit 
of" some worthy object. Smaller 
groups are often called upon to give, 
with the hejp of pupils from the Vo- 
cal and Piano Departments, an after- 
noon or tin evening of pleasure to 
people who are shut in. 

In May, twenty-two members of the 
Senior Ensemble gave the incidental 
music for the performances at Jor- 
dan Hall of "The Prince and the Pau- 
per." given by the Lend-A-Hand Dra- 
matic C'lub. loiter in May three pu- 
pils of the Vocal Department — Doro- 
thy Greeley, Alice Foley and Marie 
Fleming took the principal parts in 
the Oporetta, "The Japanose Girl,” 
given at Jordan Hall by the League 
for Community Service, and conduct- 
ed by Miss M. Edith Blake. Head of 
the Vocal Department of the Music 
School. 

The School feels that it owes a spe- 
cial expression of appreciation to the 
public which has so loyally contrib- 
uted to enable it to hold together its 
organization through the trying sea- 
sons of 1917-1S and 1918-19. During 
the war it was the announced policy 
of the School to run on a budget esti- 
mated from the fees paid by the pu- 
pils and the response in subscriptions 
to its annual appeal for funds, and 
riot make any of the usual efforts to 
increase these by entertainments for 
its own benefit; all money raised by 
ntertainments during this time hav- 
ing been given to war-relief funds. 

When the entrance of our country 
into the war brought the many press- 
ing financial appeals to everyone, it 
was feared that many or these 
Schools, whose self-devoted function 
it is to arouse and foster an interest 
in music, to raise standards of appre- 
ciation and to give practical funda- 
mental training in its expression, 
would he obliged to discontinue their 
wo, k for lack of funds. It may be 
fairly considered a real tribute from 


New Hooks 

Anderson, W. B. Physics for technical 
indents in colleges and universi- 
ties. LH.A54 

Benson, E. F. Across the stream. 

Pig wood, George. Cotton. (Staple 
trades and industries.) TMC.B48 
Bloomfield. Meyer. Management and 
men; a record of new steps in in- 
dustrial relations. HE45.B62 

Brown, ixiuise F. The freedom of the 
seas. KL.B81 

Buckrose, J. E. The tale of Mr. Tubbs. 
Cabot, R. C. Social work; essays on 
the meeting-ground of doctor and 
sociul worker. IG.C11 

Canby, H. S. Our house. 

Chesterton, C. E. History of the 
United States. F83.C42 

Desmond, Shaw. Democracy. 

Draper, F. W. M. Pitman’s commer- 
cial French grammar. X39G.D79 
Dynes. Sarah A. Socializing the 
child; a guide to the teaching of 
history in the primary grades. 

IK.D9S 

Elliott, A. D. Traditions of British 
statesmanship; some comment on 
pussing events. JZ45.E46 

Grant. Douglas. Booty. 

Grenfell, W. T. Labrador days; tales 
of the sea toilers. 

Jones, H. W. Sure and unsafe demo- 
cracy; a commentary on political 
administration in the Americun 
Commonwealths. JG.J71 

Kolbe, P. R. The colleges in war 
time and after; a contemporary ac- 
count of the effect of the war upon 
higher education in Americu. 

II83.K83 

Laski, H. J. Authority in the modern 
state. JAJ.L33a 

Leeder, S. II. Modern sons of the 
Pharoabs ; a study of the manners 
and customs of the Copts of Egypt. 

G71.L51 

Marshall, H. It. Mind and conduct; 
Morse lectures delivered at the 
Union Theological Seminary in 
1919. BI1..VI35 m 

Ormerod, Frank. Wool. (Staple 
trades and Industries.) TMA.073 
Pearson, Arthur. Victory over blind- 
ness; how it was won by the men of 
St. Duustan’s und how others may 
win it. IZB.P81 

Pease, F. F. Modern shipbuilding 
terms defined und illustrated. 

SO.P32 

I oes. A. J. The shrieking pit. 

Twain. Mark. In defense of Harriot 
Shelley, and other essays. Y.T91 I 
Witwor, I I. (’, "A smile a minute.” 

Awful to Think Of. 

The whale Is said to yield u barrel 
of milk at a milking. But what hup- 
pens to the milker If shu gota care- 
less with her tail? 


the public and a proof of the steadily 
growing appreciation of the value of 
music to the morale of the citizen 
and the community, that most of 
them, like the West Newton Music 
School, have received loyal support 
during these hard years; and while 
forced somewhat to curtnil their reg- 
ular activities, they have fduftd ways 
to help in the great work to which 
the country has been dedicated which 
have still further established their 
standing nnd justified their claim to 
existence, in the public estimation. 

The West Newton Music School was 
established in April, 1911, for the pur- 
pose of offering good instruction at 
rates which nil could afford, and of 
carrying on the group-work, proper 
to such a school, which gives the 
training and experience that make the 
individual work vnstly more effective 
and valuable, not only to the Individu- 
al. but to the School Orchestras, Glee 
Clubs, and later on, to the Community 
Choruses nnd Orchestras that are be- 
ginning to spring up as the value of 
community music becomes better un- 
derstood. As is now well known, the 
Music School receives the hearty co- 
operation of the Public Schools; and 
the elimination of "overhead charge*” 
which this co-operation permits, with 
the fees paid for lessons, make the 
School approximately 50 per cent self- 
suporting. so that a very large 
large proportion of the money avail- 
able is spent on the actual expense 
of the music work. 

The Eliza W. Luke Scholarship and 
the Scholarship given annually by Mr. 
Henry M. Wood, are used for the bene- 
fit of pupils who require special ad- 
vantages. 

With the return of more normal 
conditions it is hoped that the re- 
sponse to the appeal for next season 
will increase the number of subscrib- 
ers and will warrant the opening of 
the much-needed Department for or- 
chp°tral wind-instruments. It Is 
planned to start at the Peirce School 
a small class of beginners on the vi- 
olin in order to lessen the expense to 
pupils and to "try out" their fitness 
for the instrument. The Music School 
will also conduct the Peirce School 
Orchestra, which will be open to any 
one playing a suitable instrument. It 
is hoped that both these activities can 
be carried on as part of the regular 
school work, in school hours, as Dr. 
Paul C. Scarboro, the Head-master, is 
in cordial sympathy with the plan; 
and that it can be carried on in other 
schools as the demand arises and the 
money is available to cover the small 
expense. 

The Musical Director of the Music 
School is Miss Elizabeth Fyffe. Heads 
of the several Departments are: Vio- 
lin Department. Mrs. Julia Pickard 
Stoessel; Piano Department, Miss 
Lillian W. West; Vocal Department, 
Miss M. Edith Blake. 

The Officers of the School are: Miss 
Mabel T. Eager, President; Miss Paul- 
ine S. Howard, Vice-President; Mrs. 
L. A. Kimberly. Treasurer; Miss Mar- 
ion Chidsey, Secretary. 

Trustees are, the above officers, and 
Miss Mabel C. Bragg, Mr. L. W. Bates, 
Mrs. David E. Baker, Miss M. Edith 
Blake, Mrs. Harry L. Burrage. Mr. 
Richard B. Carter, Mrs. Henry B. Day. 
Miss Elizabeth Fyffe, Mrs. F. W. Lesh, 
Mrs. Norman Marshall, Mrs. II. M 
Milliken, Mrs. O. W. Palmer, Miss Lil- 
lian W. West. 


Pre-war postal rates will become ef- 
fective July 1. Acting Postmaster W. 
E. Hurley states that., beginning July 
1. the rate of postage on all mail mat- 
ter or the first class shall be the same 
as the rate in force on Oct. 2. 1917. 
The revenue act calling for the high- 
er rates has been repealed. 

Two and three-cent postal cards 
will he discontinued at the close of 
business June 30, and all unused 1 two- 
cent single domestic and domestic re- 
ply postal cards, and three-cent 
stamped envelopes will he redeemed 
at full value, provided they are pre- 
sented before Aug. 1 and exchanged 
for other stamped paper. 

in no cases will postal cards or 
stamped envelopes he redeemed in 
cash. "The public will be allowed one 
month from July 1 in which to present 
their two-cent cards and three-cent 
envelopes for exchange at lull value,” 
said Postmaster Hurley. "After the 
expiration of that time postage value 
only shall be allowed for the envel- 
opes and three-fourths or postage 
value for the cards." 

Three-cent adhesive stamps will 
not be redeemable or exchangeable, 
but will continue to lie good for use 
on mail to the amount of three cents 
or more. 

WIIY THEY FOUGHT 


"Jos. Jimsonweed, a corporal from out 
in Yankakakee, 

Went forth to meet a German squad 
and chased them up a tree; 

And as lie did so, loud he cried above 
the buttle’s roar, 

‘Hurrah for our dear President — and 
Peuce Point Number Four.’ 

“Pat Murphy of the horse marines, a 
leather-neck of old, 

Met up one day with seven Huns and 
luid the muckers cold. 

Ho murmured us lie put an end to all 
their evil tricks, 

‘My only motive is my love for Peuce 
Point Number Six.’ 

"Upon the battlefield was found, right 
at the point of death, 

A gallant lad who said these words 
with scunt and failing breath, 

‘ "Pis sad to think that in this way 1 
should have met my fate, 

But never mind, I've done my hit for 
Peaco Point Number Eight.’ 

"Oh, muny a time in blood-stuined 
France the stamlers-by could hear 

Our Yankees charge into the fruy with 
this resounding cheer; 

‘Huzzali, huzzuh, we'll win the day, 
and never siiull we ceuse, 

Till we have forced upon the foe our 
Fourteen oPints of Peace.’ ” 


GREENS FOR GUMPTION 


How much will you spend to avoid 
"that tired feeling?" 

Now Is the time for health insur- 
ance at bargain prices! 

The price of spinach and beet 
greens is at the present time as low 
as it Is likely to go, much lower thun 
the growers care to see It. In many 
places spinach is being ploughed un- 
der because it is not considered n 
paying proposition to market it. 

Are the Middlesex County house- 
wives aware of the loss that this 
means to them? Is not the health of 
the family the best investment to he 
made? Why feed to the soil or to the 
stock something that means ho much 
to the well-being of the household? 

A lack of greens next winter will 
menu a lack of mineral matter in the 
diet, resulting in "that tired feeling" 
when spring comes again. It is very 
costly to try and cure that feeling 
with drugs. It is thrifty common 
sense to prevent it by means of 
proper food. 

One peck of greens will fill two 
pint jars. If every household in the 
county should buy one bushel and 
can it for next winter, it would save 
Tor human consumption something 
that no one can cut out of the diet 
without suffering for it. Green food 
will win the war against unbalanced 
meals. Every housewife who starts 
the fashion of canning greens this 
week, is doing a service to her house- 
hold and her town. 

Uncle Sam’s directions for canning 
greens are as follows: Can greens 
the day they are picked. Wasli clean, 
sort thoroughly, allowing no foreign 
weed leaves or other vegetable matter 
to remain. Rid the greens of all sand, 
dirt, dry. and decayed or diseased 
leaves. Place the greens in a crate 
or cheese-cloth and blanch in live 
steam either in an improvised home- 
made steamer or regular commercial 
steamer for 15 minutes. Remove the 
greens and plunge quickly into cold 
water. Place on the table and cut into 
convenient lengths. Pack tight in hot 
jars or tin cans. Ad hot water to fill 
the container and season to taste. 
The product will be slightly improved 
if a few strips of boiled bacon or 
chipped beef are added. A little olive 
oil also improves the flavor. Place 
rubbers and tops in position on jars; 
partially seal. Sterilizq in water 
bath for 120 minutes. 

Remove from canner; tighten covers 
of jars; invert to cool, and test the 
joints. Wrap in paper to prevent 
bleaching, and store. 

Here is a rule for making spinach 
loaf which is as good now as during 
the war. Any other greens may be 
substituted. You can make a small 
can of spinach, chard, or beet tops 
serve seven or eight people by making 
into a loaf combined with rice or 
bread crumbs. Asparagus or string 
beans are also good served this way. 

1 can clioped spinach 

4 cups boiled rice 

2 cups white sauce 

l red pepper 

Make a thick white sauce of two 
cups skim milk, four tablespoons 
dour, four tablespoons oleomargarine 
and one teaspoon salt. Melt fat and 
mix with flour, add to milk and stir 
over fire until it thickens. Mix with 
the rice, chopped spinach and pepper. 
Form into a loaf and bake 20 or 30 
minutes. 


GINN— CTTLEB 


On Monday Miss Margaret Morse 
Cutler, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred- 
eric F. Cutler, of Hobart road, Newton 
Centre, was married to Mr. Edwin 
linn of Winchester, Mass. 

The ceremony was performed at 
the home of the bride by the Rev. Os- 
car B. Hawes of the Unitarian Church, 
Newton Centre. The best man was 
Mr. John Scott Browning, Jr., of New 
York City, the matron of honor, Mrs. 
Ralph C. Piper of Cambridge, sister 
of the bride, the bridesmaids, Miss 
Oretchen Ginn, sister of the groom, 
and Miss Sally Fowler of Washington, 
D. C. 

The bride was dressed in white 
satin trimmed with applique lace and 
wore a white chiffon bridal veil. The 
matron of honor and the bridesmaids 
wore gowns of tea rose chiffon with 
brown trimmings, and hats of brown 
tulle, and carried houquets of blue 
larkspur. 

A reception at the house which was 
beautifully decorated with roses and 
peonies, followed the ceremony. Mu- 
sic was by Woodbridge’s orchestra. 
In the receiving line were Mr. and 
Mrs. Cutler, and Dr. and Mrs. Robb. 

After a motor trip of two weeks Mr. 
and Mrs. Ginn will live in Winchester 
for the remainder of the summer. 
They will probably go to Cambridge 
for the winter. 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and 
all other persons interested 1 in the 
estate of William B. Bosson late of 
Newton in said County, deceased. 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will and tes- 
tument of said deceased has been pre- 
sented to said Court, for Probate, by 
Edward I*. Bosson who prays that 
letters testamentary may he issued 1 to 
him, teh executor therein named, 
without giving u surety on his official 
bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at 
a Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex 
on the seventh day of July A. 1). 1919, 
at nine o’clock in the forenoon, to 
Hhow cause, if any you have, why the 
same should not be granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the lust publication 
to he one duy, at least, before said 
Court, and by mailing postpaid, or de- 
livering a copy of this citation to ull 
known persons interested in the es- 
tate, fourteen days ut least before said 
Court. 

WltuoHs, ('buries .1. Me In tire. Eh. 
quire, First Judge of suid Court, this 
thirteenth day of June in the year one 
thousand nine hundred und nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
June 20-27-July 4 


REAL ESTATE 
NEWTONS ! ! 

NEWTON REAL ESTATE 
OWNERS: Our spring season Is 
here and we are having an un- 
usual demand for real estate of 
all kinds. Whether your house 
is for sale or to rent it will be 
to your best interests to list par- 
ticulars with us immediately. A 
card or ’phone call will bring a 
representative and expert ad- 
vice will be given gratis. 

We respectfully solicit your 
patronage and assure you per- 
sonal interest and active service 
— at all times. 

See Us First I 

John T. Burns & Sons, Inc. 

363 CENTRE ST., NEWTON 
807 Washington St, Newtonvllle 
Com. Ave., cor. Manet R<L, N. C. 

Tel. 670-124 New. No. 


ANNUITIES 

have become. a favorite investment 
for those desiring an absolutely 
sure net income without worry. 

ANNUITIES 

have certain desirable features 
with reference to Income and In- 
heritance Taxes. 

REFUND ANNUITIES 

of the Equitable Life have special 
features guaranteeing repayment 
to some one of every dollar paid 
in. 

RICHARD O. WALTER 
31 Equitable Bldg., Boston 

Please furnish me information 
regarding annuities: 


Name 

Address 

Date of Birth 


CRAWFORD’S 

GARAGE AND TAXI SERVICE 

INC. 

Machines For AH Purposes 

CADILLAC and FORD CARS 
ALL NIGHT SERVICE 

Best of Service and Ample Storage 
for Private Automobiles 

49 Elmwood Street 

Fred L. Crawford, Manager 
Telephone: Newton North 330# 


BRUCE R. WARE, B. C. S. 

IH CHURCH HT„ NEWTON, mahb 
BOSTON OFFICE : No. 6 BEACON STREET 
Telephone Hayrnarket tiU 

Public Accountant 

looks Opened, Closed and Adjusted 
vudltlng of Corporation and Mercantile 
Accounts A SnectalUr 

HARRIS E. JOHONNOT 

Electrician and Contractor 

13< PEARL ST, NEWTON 
Order Office 392 Centre St, Newton 
Telephone 1«71-J Newton North 
ret 17S Newton North 


L. EDWIN CHASE 

Teacher of 

Violin Mandolin Guitar 

Will Receive Pupils After Oct. 10 At Mis 
NEW STUDIO 
81ft WASHINGTON STREET 
(Opp. R. R. Station) 

NEWTON VILLK 

Telephone: Newton West 10R9-M 

ADDRESS: 2202 COMMONWEALTH AVE., AUIURNDALE 


W. H. WALLACE, Builder 

36 Vernon St., Newton 
N. N. 768-J 

Remodeling. Roofing and Jobbing 
promptly attended to 
Orders taken at 74J6 Elmwood St. 
N. N. 593- W 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 

To the heirs-at-law, next of kin, cred- 
itors. and all other persons inter- 
ested in the estate of Sarah Emma 
Stanton late of Newton in said 
County, deceased, Intestate. 
WHEREAS a petition has been pre- > 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration on the estate of said 
deceased to Harold B. Stanton of 
Watertown in the County of Middle- 
sex, without giving a surety on his 
bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court to b*e held at Cam- 
bridge, in said County of Middlesex, 
on the thirtieth day of June A.D. 1919, 
at nine o’clock in the forenoon, to 
show cause if any you have, why the 
same should not be granted. 

And the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the last publication 
to be one day, at least, before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, thin 
fifth day of June in the year one thou- 
sand nine hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

June 6-13-20. 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To all persons interested in the es- 
tate of Emily DeBacon Page late of 
Newton in said County, deceased; 
WHEREAS, Harry E. Richards the 
executor of the will of said deceased, 
has presented for allowance, the first 
account of his administration upon the 
estate of said deceased: 

You arc hereby cited to appear at 
a Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County, on the twenty- 
fourth day of June A.D. 1919, at nine 
o’clock in the forenoon, to show 
cause, if any you have, v r hy tho same 
should not be allowed. 

And said executor is ordered to 
serve this citation by delivering a 
copy thereof to all persons Interested 
in the estate fourteen days at least 
before said Court, or by publishing 
tho same onco in each week, for three 
successive weeks, in the Newton 
Graphic a newspaper published in 
Newton the last publication to be one 
day at least before said Court, and by 
mailing, post-paid, a copy of this ci- 
tation to all known persons interested 
in the estate seven days at least be- 
fore said Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-ninth day of May in tho year 
one thousand nine hundred and nine- 
teen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

June 6 13-20 


Notice Is hereby given that the sub- 
scriber has been duly appointed exe- 
cutor of the will of Ann W. Lane, also 
known as Annie W. Lane, Annie W. 
R. I-ane, and Annie R. Lane, late of 
Newton, in the County of Middlesex, 
deceased, testate, and has taken upon 
himself that trust by giving bond, as 
the law directs. All persons having 
demands upon the estate of said de- 
ceased are hereby required to exhibit 
the same; and all persons indebted to 
said estate are called upon to make 
payment to 

HERBERT R. LANE, Executor. 

34 Chauney St., Boston, Mass. 

June 12, 1919. 

June 13-20-27. 


same should not be granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby di- 
rected to give public notice thereof, 
by publishing this citation once in 
each week, for three successive 
weeks, in the Newton Graphic a news- 
paper published in Newton the last 
publication to be one day, at least, 
before said Court, and by mailing 
postpaid, or delivering a copy of this 
citation to all known persons inter- 
ested in the estate, seven duys at least 
before said Court. 

Witness. Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
third day of June in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 

June G-13-20. 


ME GEO. W. BUSH CO. 

BURT M. RICH, Proprietor 

Funeral Directors 

Established 1874 

Are Located at 402 Centre Street 


AUTO II KA RHK — I.1MOUHINB CAM 


WHITE HOUSE 



F. Anderson. Residence, 27 Wilmot St., Watertown 
Res. Tel. Newton North 1173-M 

A. B. Levander. Residence, 38 Gilbert St., Watertown 

LIBERTY MOTOR MART 

(Anderson & Levander, Props.) 

(Formerly Furbush Garage) 

Automobile Accessories, Etc. 

Auto Repairing of All Kinds 

Live Storage Cara for Hire 

1203 Washington St., YV'e«t Newton 

Telephones: 1210 Newton West, 71299 Newton West 


NEW TOM FREE LIBRARY 


RE1HTE0 POSTAGE 


4 



Tin: NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1*1#. 


9 



BRACELET WATCHES 


FOR GRADUATES 

Extensive auortment of the popular small size Waltham, 
Elgin, Illinois and Hamilton models in I4k gold and 25 
year gold filled, at prices from... $20 to $75 

Latest style watches for young, men, Waltham, Elgin, 
Hamilton and Illinois movements, at prices from $15 to $40 

The E. B„ Horn Co. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1839 

429 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON 


JOINT CELEBRATION 


Y. M. C. A. ATHLETIC MEET 


(Continued from Page 1) 

work, spoke of the large number of 
Americans of foreign birth in this 
country and said that what we asked 
of them was loyalty to this country in 
peace as well as in war. He told of an 
interview with the Kaiser in 1911 in 
which the latter asked him what he 
had particularly noticed along the 
Rhine. When Mayor Fitzgerald an- 
swered that it was the many smoke 
stacks he seemed greatly pleased. Al- 
ready he was planning for the com- 
mercial supremacy of Germany, 

In his plans for the conquest of the 
world, however. Mr. Fitzgerald said 
that the Kaiser had forgot to reckon 
with the spirit of America, that spirit 
of the founders of this country, which 
places principle above material gain. 

The remainder of the afternoon was 
spent in a general good time, the chil- 
dren playing games, and the older peo- 
ple enjoying the restful shade of the 
playground. 

At six o’clock a banquet was served 
to 80 men in the service, after which 
Mayor Childs made a most inspiring 
address. The program concluded with 
dancing until dark. 

' A special feature of the occasion was 
the decorations. All along the route 
of the parade the business houses and 
private homes were effectively decor- 
ated with bunting and flags. Especial- 
Iv attractive was the Lucy Jackson 
Chanter House on Washington street. 

The committee in charge were Mr. 
Alfred Murray, chairman, David F. 
Warren. John Cleming. Miss Rose 
Leon. Mrs. Mary Cunnineham, Mrs. Al- 
fred Murray, and Miss Helen Warren. 
Those having charge of the Banquet 
were Frank Gonlon. John Fleming. 
James Cooney. Timothy Healey, and 
Patrick Gleason. In charge of the dec- 
orations were Messrs. Joseph Monhe- 
gan. Cornelius Lane, Edward White 
and William Taffe. 



WEDDING GIFTS 
in 

Silver and Cut Glass 
Lowest Prices Always 
S*41 SUMMER ST BOSTON ^ 



Fine Stationery, Engraving and 
Printing, Wedding Announce- 
ments and Club Invita- 
tions, Reception and 
Ylslting Cards 


OFFICE SUPPLY HOUSE 
57-61 Franklin St, Boston 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin, credi- 
tors, and all other persons interest- 
ed in the estate of Mary Levesque 
late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased. intestate. 

WHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration on the estate of said 
deceased to Ida Marchant of Water- 
town in the County of Middlesex, 
without giving a surety on her bond. I 
You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge, in said County of Middlesex, 
on the eighth day of July A. D. 1919, 
at nine o’clock in the forenoon, to 
show cause if any you have, why the 
'same should not be granted. 

Ami the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the last publication 
to be one day, at least, before said 
Court. 

Witness, Cliurlcs J. Mclntire, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
eighteenth day of June in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
June 20-27-July 4 

Notice In Hereby Given that the 'I* 1 ' 
acribors huve been duly appointed ex- 
ecutors of the will of John Q. A. Whit- 
temore late of Newton in the County 
of Middlesex, deceased, testate, uml 
have taken upon themselves that trust 
by giving bonds, as the luw directs. 
All persons having demands upon the 
estate of said deceased are hereby re- 
quired to exhibit the suiue; uml all 
persons indebted to said estate are 
called upon to make payment to 
CHARLOTTE B. WHITTEMORE, 
LOUIS M. llANNUM, 
Executors. 

* (Address) 

No. 2 Washington St., Newton, Muss. 

Muy seventh, 1919. 

June 20-27-July 4 


Besides the ball game Saturday, 
there were held two Athletic Meets, 
making it a big day on the Y. M. C. A. 
field. After the baseball victory New- 
ton set to and got her field ready for 
an Athletic Meet with Somerville and 
Boston. The juniors and seniors of 
the above Y. M. C. A.’s participated. 
The winners of the standard events 
run off are as follows: — 

Juniors. 50 yd. dash — 1st, Widner, 
Newton, time 6 4-5 seconds; 2nd, Jones 
of Boston; 3rd, Gould of Boston. 

Juniors. 100 yd. dash — 1st, Jones of 
Boston; 2nd, Widner of Newton; 3rd, 
Mills of Somerville. Time, 12 secs. 

Relay Race — Won by Boston. 

Total Junior Points: — Boston. 14; 
Newton, 9; Somerville, 4. 

Seniors, 100 yd. dash — 1st, Carlson 
of Newton, time 10 1-5 sec.; 2nd, 

Brackett of Somerville; 3rd, Smith 
of Somerville. » 

220 yd. dash — 1st, Stevenson of 
Newton, time, 24 3-5 sec; 2nd. Carl- 
son of Newton; 3rd, Smith of Somer- 
ville, Bailey of Newton. 

440 yd. dash — 1st, Robinson of Som- 
erville; 2nd, Brackett of Somerville; 
3rd. Wilson of Newton. 

880 yd. run — 1st, Robinson of Som- 
erville, time, 2-20 1-2; 2nd, Wilson of 
Newton; 3rd. Edgeton of Somerville. 

Running High Jump — 1st. Fitts and 
Feeney of Boston. Height, 5 ft. 11 in.; 
3rd. Brimblecom of Newton. 

Relay race won by Somerville, run- 
ning herself. 

Total senior points; Boston, 8; 
Newton. 18 1-2; Somerville, 18 1-2. 

Mention might be made of the good 
showing of Gus Carlson of Waltham 
in the 100 yd. dash which was run in 
10 1-5 sec. Also the notable record, 
5 ft. 11 in., made by Fitts and Feeney 
of Boston in the high jump, and of 
Stevenson of Waltham in 220 yd. dash. 

The Junior “B” class of the Newton 
Y. M. C. A. held its Athletic Meet earl- 
ier in the day on the Y. M. C. A. field. 
All events were well contested. The 
winners of the different events fol- 
low: 

50 yd. dash — G. Kennison, time 7 1-5 
sec. 

Baseball throwing — C. Aucoin, dis- 
tance 198 ft. 4Jn. 

Running high jump — J. MacLean. 
Height, 3 ft. 6 in. 

Speeding around bases: "Mickey” 
Dargon, time 17 2-5 sec. 


NEWTON UNION SERVICES 


The Channing, Congregational, Bap- 
tist and Methodist churches will hold 
Union Summer Services the Sundays 
of July and August at 10.30 A. M. The 
services will be in charge of the min- 
ister of the church in which they are 
held, or of his supply. They will be 
held according to the following ar- 
rangement: — 

July 6, 13 and 20, Baptist Church, 
Rev. Newton A. Merritt. 

July 27 and Aug. 3, Methodist 
Church, Rev. Henry H. Crane. 

August 10 and 17, Channing Church, 
Rev. Harry Lutz. 

August 24 and 31, Eliot Church, Rev. 
H. Grant Person. 


NEWTON BRANCH SPECIAL AID 


During 1 the month of May the fol- 
lowing articles were made in the 
workroom: Garments 130, Small gar- 
ments 519, Knit garments 348, Cotton 
garments 21. Total 1018. 

More articles have already been dis- 
tributed during June then were made 
in June of last year. 


1 1 SILK 

Holeproof 

HOSE 

W E are pleased to 
announce that the 
arrival yesterday 
of a second very 
large shipment of Silk Hole- 
proof Hose ^uts us again in 
position to fill all orders 
from this extremely popular 
brand. 

This big assortment in- 
cludes Black, White, Field 
Mouse, Gray, Taupe, African 
Brown and Cordovan shades 
in hemmed top and full 
fashioned styles for women, 
and the same colors in 
smooth fitting styles for 
men. 

Quick selling is certain. 

We advise BUY NOW! 


FOR WOMEN 

(3 Pairs in a Box) 

Hemmed Top $3.75 

Full Fashioned $6.75 

FOR MEN 

(3 Pairs in a Box) 

Silk - $2.55 

Extra Heavy $3.30 


Assortments Also lor Boys and Girls. 
Delivery Paid in New England. 

TALBOT CO. 

395-403 Washington St. 
BOSTON 


SCHOOL NOTES 


Stearns School 

Tho pupilfl having the highest rank 
In Grade VII' for this year were: 
Maurice Hoffman, Edmund Quigley, 
Martha Dunleavy, Violet Perry. 

Acldhvcment Club 

The boys and girls of the Achieve- 
ment Club enjoyed having Miss Stock- 
in with them, again, Monday after- 
noon, for a lesson in canning. 

Miss Stockin, formerly in charge 
of the community work carried on by 
the Stearns School Centre Association, 
is now assistant director of boys and 
girls’ club work in Middlesex County. 
Nantnsket 

The teachers of the Stearns School 
enjoyed Thursday afternoon at Nan- 
tasket. 

There were sixteen in the party in- 
cluding two friends, Miss Dow of the 
Emerson School, and Miss Rice, As- 
sistant Drawing Supervisor. 

A basket lunch and bathing were 
the chief features of the afternoon. 

Industrial Arts 

The Industrial Arts department dur- 
ing the Summer term will be in charge 
of Mr. Holman, who will have Master 
Wilfrftd Cormier for his assistant. 
During this short terra we aim to turn 
out some large pieces of work. 

During the presnt school year we 
have turned out several sets of book 
shelves, double picture frames with 
shelves for ornaments, sand tables, 
two large desks, a library table of oak, 
some caned leg rests, baby swings, 
kidicars, wheelbarrows, and numerous 
smaller articles. 

Several pairs of shoes were re- 
pared by a new class in shoe repairing 
also. 

This department has done nearly all 
the furniture repairing of two school 
buildings, beside its regular manual 
training. 

Our print shop has also contributed 
a good assortment of work for the use 
of the School Department as well as 
our own school. 

Simple exercises will be held in the 
School Assembly Hall, on Monday. 
June 23rd, at two o’clock. Mayor 
Childs will present the diplomas. The 
prizes for the three best essays on 
Historical subjects will be presented 
by the President of the Daughters of 
the Revolution, Mrs. Edwin P. Leon- 
ard of Newtonville, and there will be 
music by the school chorus. 


Bigelow School 


Flag Day at the Bigelow School last 
Friday was a great success. As the 
weather was favorable the marching 
took place on the school grounds, the 
grades competing with each other in 
marching. Each grade had its own 
flag bearer and so well was the 
marching done that it was very diffi- 
cult to decide which did the best, the 
honor was finally awarded to the 4th 
grade, the 8th not being couhted. In 
addition to the marching, Eleanor 
Campbell recited the "Flag of Our 
Country,” Marshall Fellows, “The 
American Flag,” and Robert Weeks, 
"Old Glory,” the latter was written 
by Miss Dyer, the assistant principal 
of the school, for the occasion, and 
was given with much power and evi- 
dent understanding of the meaning. 


Emerson School 


The class of 1919 of the Emerson 
school will receive their diplomas on 
Monday at 2 o’clock in the school hall. 
The presentation of the diplomas will 
be made by Miss Mabel C. Bragg, as- 
sistant superintendent. The class is 
the largest one in the history of the 
school, numbering 52. In the evening 
at 8 o’clock a class party will be held 
in the school hall. Nora O’Shaugh- 
nessy and Robert Holt are to give the 
class prophecy and Lenore Bennett 
the class history. A fund of 50 dol- 
lars has been raised by the class for 
the purpose of school room decora- 
tion. 


C. C. Burr School 


Last Thursday, June 12, Miss Kelley 
of the seventh and eighth grades at 
the Charles C. Burr School of Auburn- 
dale took ten scholars who had obtain- 
ed a certain rank to Boston. A visit 
was made to the State House after 
which a luncheon was served at Fi- 
lene’s restaurant. It proved to be a 
very pleasant trip as well as a proflt- 
'aBTe one. 

On June 18, 1919, the girls of the 
fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth grades 
of the Burr and Williams Schools met 
in the Burr School Hall to listen to 
a lecture on hygiene by Catherine G. 
Kent, R. N. Its object was to enroll 
members in a campaign for health 
which will hold classes every Friday 
for nine weeks this summer. Special 
time will be given to teach the value 
of personal healtl) and home sanita- 
tion. but most of all the girls will be 
taught how to bathe, feed and clothe 
the baby from its birth to childhood. 

At the end of the nine classes a pub- 
lic graduation will be held when the 
girls having the best note books on 
the subject will receive diplomas. 

This movement is under the super- 
vision of Mr. Ernst Hermann of tho 
Newton Playground Department. 


I h© Fessenden School 


The Fessenden School held its grad- 
uation exercises at the school build- 
ing in West Newton last Thursday. 
The address to the graduates was de- 
livered by Lewis Perry, L. L. D., of 
Phillips Exeter. 

There were nineteen graduates two 
being from West Newton viz: Court- 
landt Sherrington Gross, and James 
Abbot Hutchinson, Jr. 

The honor list is as follows: 

For the highest average in all sub- 
jects during the year T. Hunting Chap- 
pell; attaining a high average in all 
subjects for the entire year (85-90) T. 
Huntington Chappell, Talcott M'. 
Banks, Jr., Robert C. Duncan, Court- 
land S. Gross, Francis D. McCaulloy, 
Jr.; attaining an average of 80-85 Ar- 
thit Abba, Guorge B. Hamblin, Jr., P. 
Robert R. Anderson. Everett Frazer, 
Robert O. Hereford. John A. Thomas, 
Sumner II. Foster, Van A. Durrell and 
H. George Sulzer. 


Death's Sting. 

On© of the tragedies of death la thut 
the man never know* tho glory of 
hla obituary notices. 




iOOOl 


IN THE 

$8000 to $28,000 

Ready for Occupancy in September 


8 TO 14 ROOMS— 1 TO 5 BATHS 
GARAGE FOR 1 TO 8 CABS 
BUILT OF BRICK, SIDING, OR 
STUCCO 

We bnlld to yonr order on any of our 
Newton estates. We are prepared to 
build very close to pre-war prices. Lot 
its show you. 


60 STATE STRE 

[0=01= 


30E301 


NEWTONS t 

I 

D 

O 

O 

D 

O 


Make your selection now — First 
because the locations are limited; 
second because we must start your 
house now for occupancy in Sep- 
tember. 

The lota are priced from $10C0 up. 
Located on — 

Commonwealth Av. 

Chestnut St. 

Howland Rd. 

Grove Hill At. 

Bullough Park 
In Waban 

West Newton 
Newton rill© 


IOOOl 


Tel. Main 5305 

[01=301 


Demonstration Home Garden 


Uncle Cy asked by his neighbor 
why he had so many bugs on his 
crops. The farmer replied that every 
time he killed a bug a dozen more 
came to the funeral. 

Sometimes it does seem as if this 
was the case so rapidly do the insects 
breed and increase. At the first ap- 
pearance of any insect measures for 
its control should be taken at once. 
Another week of neglect might mean 
a ruined crop or a badly damaged 
garden. ♦ 

Look the tomato plants over for 
signs of plant lice. A curled leaf 
turned brown will give you a clue. 
The one or two plant lice you find 
there are the forerunners of countless 
thousands a few weeks later. Buy 
some 40 per cent Nicotine Sulphate 
such as "Black Leaf 40” and use it 
NOW. 

If you have a small patch of pota- 
toes, destroy the yellow egg clusters 
of the potato bug which you will find 
on the underside of the leaves. . It 
will pay you to do this. Potato bug 
eggs are also found on tomato leaves, 
lettuce, blades of grass and other 
plants. Potatoes should he sprayed 
now with Bordeaux mixture and ar- 
senate of lead. An application every 
two weeks up until the last of August 
is required for best results. A fine 
penetrating mist gives the best satis- 
faction in spraying and care should 
be taken that the stems or the plants 
and the underside of the leaves are 


sprayed as well as the exposed leaf 
surface. 

Vine borers do a vast amount of 
damage to cucumbers, squashes and 
melons. A practical way for the 
home gardener to prevent much of 
this trouble is to cover the hills with 
a frame covered with mosquito net- 
ting. These protectors not only keep 
away the vine borer moths but the 
striped cucumber beetles and squash 
bugs until the time arrives when the 
vines require more space in which to 
grow. At this period it is too late 
for the vine borers to do much dam- 
age. However, if the borers do get 
into the vine through neglect they 
should be removed through a slit in 
the stem near the ground as soon as 
the vine commences to wilt. Damp 
dirt should be banked up against the 
vine where the slit is made. If sev- 
eral joints of the vine are covered 
with soil a secondary root system 
will develop and thereby help to main- 
fain a vigorous plant. 

Striped cucumber beetles do much 
damage to cucumber, squash and 
other vines. They not only eat the 
foliage but penetrate it thus making 
places through which the blight 
spores enter. Much of the damage 
from the striped beetles can be pre- 
vented by using the protectors as out- 
lined above. One should start spray- 
ing their vines as soon as the pro- 
tector is removed and spray each 
week with strong arsenate of lead in 
order to prevent the beetles doing 
serious damage. Bordeaux is always 
added to the arsenate in order to keep 


out blight. The experience of some 
gardeners has shown that moth balls 
or othr strong repellants placed 
among hills of cucumbers or squashes 
will serve to keep insects away due 
to the repellant odor. 

Rose bugs are a hard proposition 
in the garden but a good strong 
sweetened arsenical spray will put 
them out of business. Use 1 pound of 
lead arsenate paste to 3 gallons of 
water and sweeten with a little mo- 
lasses. 

Some form of arsenate such as ar- 
senate of lead and some fungicide 
such as Bordeaux mixture and a 40 
per cent. Nicotine Sulphate as "Black 
Leaf 40" are the only spray materials 
needed by the average home gardener. 
Arsenate of lead and bordeaux are 
often combined in a convenient paste 
form. It is undoubtedly more con- 
venient to use one of the commercial 
bordeaux-lead combinations than to 
try to make them at home when need- 
ed in only small quantities although 
they are much more expensive. Use 
three times as strong as recommend- 
ed. Bordeaux-lead combinations will 
prevent blights on potatoes, cucum- 
bers and melons and kill all leaf eat- 
ing insects such as potato bugs, flea 
beetles and most caterpillars. "Black 
Leaf 40" kills by contact all sucking 
insects, the most common of which 
are the plant lice or aphids. It may 
be safely and effectively used with 
bordeaux-lead combinations. 

An ounce of prevention in the gar- 
den at this time is worth a pound of 
spray material applied a month later. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 


The American Woolen Company announces that on June 16, 1919, it will inaugurate a system 
of group life insurance under which EVERY employee of the American Woolen Company, 
including both the selling and manufacturing departments, and by that we mean EVERYONE, 
including men, women, girls, boys, and including the officials, will receive absolutely free of 
cost to them, the company bearing the entire expense, a policy covering their lives for from 
$750 to $1500, depending upon the length of service of the particular employee. The 
schedule of amounts is given below: 


Those employed for a period of less than one year $750 

Those employed for a period of one year and less than one year and a 

half $850 

Those employed for a period of one year and a half and less than two 

years , $950 

Those employed for a period of two years and less than two years and 

a half $1050 

Those employed for a period of two years and a half and less than three 

years $H50 

Those employed for a period of three years and less than three years 

and a half $1250 

Those employed for a period of three years and a half and less than four 

years $1350 

Those employed for a period of four years and less than four and a half $1450 
Those employed for four years and a half and more $1500 


Not only is the original premium paid by the American Woolen Company, but the entire 
expense thereafter is borne by it. Under no circumstances does any employee pay even one 
penny of the cost of maintaining the policy on his or her life. 

Any employee who happens to be absent on June 16, 1919, will be included in the plan 
outlined above upon his or her return to work, provided he or she is or has been prior to 
June 16, 1919, on the payroll of the mill in which he or she is employed. Persons entering our 
employ after June 16, 1919, will not be entitled to the above privileges until he or she has 
been for six months continuously on the payro’.l of the mill in which he or she is employed. 

There is to be absolutely no cost to any employee. No medical examination is required. 
These benefits will be given IN ADDITION to any other benefits provided by the Compen- 
sation Laws of the state. 

Certificates of insurance will be provided for each employee just as soon as those cer- 
tificates can be prepared by the insurance company. 

AmericanWoolen Company 

Wm M Wood. President 

Boston, Mass., June 11, 1919. 


I 


INSURANCE 

AUTOMOBILE 

FIRE 

ACCIDENT 

HEALTH and 
LIFE 

HERBERT GALLAGHER 

99 Park St., Newton, Mass. 

TeL Newton North 14 


A NEWTON REAL ESTATE Ik 

ALVORD BROS. 

( Established 25 years) 

Main Office, 79 Milk St.. Boston. Maas. 
Local Office, opp. Newton Centre Depot 

We solicit the listing of all Newton 
land and housea for sale or to let 


INSURANCE AUCTIONEERS 
I EXPERT APPRAISERS W 


Old Natick Inn 

SOUTH NATICK, MASS. 



Just the rirht distance from Newton to 
motor to dinner 

Tel. Natick S«10 JlISS HARRIS. Mgr. 


FENCES 



Our boys are coming Home from 
France. We want work for them. Now 
Is the time to build your fence. 

Wire and Iron 

SECURITY FENCE ERECTING CO. 
284 Somerville Avenue. Somerville. Mum. 

Phone Somerville 3900 or write Dept. 
B for Estimate. 



rise 

LIABIL- 
ITY. AUTO- 
MOBILE. BUR- 
GLARY ANO EVERY 
DESCRIPTION OF INSUR- 
ANCE AT LOWEST RATES, 
f. 1 40. 14<>. 4HS 141)9 MR 


TiaadKVD h 

CARPENTER .nd CABINET MAKER 
Telephone 2159 Newton North 
Jobbing Promptly Attended To 
Residence: 

11 Roiemere Rd., Newtonvillo 

Telephone 2844-W Newton North 


PIANO ~ ror * ll * c 

m RJa^RJI lw Socialist <m ail piano troubles 
(baton oils:*, 10 Brcislioid St. TeJegboee is KaeiSasca. 
Over 20 year* experience. Rafar* to bn man, patrona. «moe« 
•bom are Ix-Gu*. Brackett. Hoa. Samuel W. McCall. E. 
Harold Croat, iv.rt Dramatic Editor end Critic, 

C»ru» Dalian the temoua Sculptor, Pbdip Stockton, Pro*. 0»<l 
Colon, Truat Co. I. I. Martin, Proa. Exchange Tmat Co. 
Newton reference a. Freedom Hutch.nion, Re*. Geo. 5. Buttera. 
Supt. Garnt, Met Lite In*. Co.. Mem*. Wobtter. Curtie. 
Konea,. Roger W. Baboon. (Weileale, 1 and man, ether •ell 
knoen Ne«t j i people. Neetoa allies C. E. !w»ael>n » period* 
kel Store. 340 Ceetre Street. 

Ao C/liT 

Tel. Bellevue 3T6-W. Mail to BoeUm.P O B..x 1759 



G. P. ATKINS 

396 Centre Street, Nswten 




10 


THE NEWTON ORA I’ll 1C’. FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1010. 


P. P. ADAMS' BIG DEPARTMENT STORE, WALTHAM 

Wash Goods 

For Every June Occasion 

Graduation, Vacation, W edding, Outing and every 
Summer needyhere now in most generous assortment. 

i 

Save Money by investing in Cotton 
Goods Now ! 

PRINTED VOILES 33c, 49c, S9c, 69c 75c 

PLAIN VOILES 

17 new colors. 40-inch width 39c 

NEWPORT VOILES 

44-inch goods 50c yd 

HAWAIIAN CLOTH 

For summer shirtings. Plain colors 59c yd 

CAMP AND VACATION NEEDFULS 
A GOOD TOWEL AT 29c 

Hemmed Turkish. Good size 29c 

HUCK TOWELS, 19c 

20-dozen lot. Hemmed Muck. Special 19c 

HOMESPUN CRASH 

Brown with red border. First time in 2 years at any 
price 23c yd 

HEMMED SHEETS 

54x90 \ . . . 89c 

SHEETS AT $1.75 

84x90. Hemmed. Good weight $1.75 

LEGAL STAMPS FREE DELIVERY 

P. P. ADAMS’ 

Big Department Store 

133-139 Moody Street Waltham 


GARDEN PARTY AT MRS. 
MADDEN’S 


Newton 


oSr WHITE BASEMENT 


FOR HOME NECESSITIES 



Headquarters for 

“Wear Ever” Aluminum Cooking Dishes and Utensils 
Also “Pyrex” Glass Cooking Dishes 

J. B. HUNTER COMPANY 

HARDWARE 

60 Summer Street, Boston 
NEWTON TAILORING CO. 413 Centre St. Newton^SC^ 

Ladies’ and Men’s Fine Tailoring 

Suits mads to order In lataat styles Cleaning, Prosing, Drsing and Rtpatrlar 

LAMBS' GAUM IE NTS and FURS ALTERED A SPECIALTY 
Work called for and deltrsrsd. Spaolal arrangements far monthly a risslsg 

Open Freeing , till I.SO. Tsl. 704-W Newton Earth 

Newton 


The garden party on the estate of 
Mrs. M. L. Madden on Centre street, 
Newton, last Saturday held for the 
benefit of the Sacred Heart Convent 
at Providence was a great success so- 
cially as well as financially. Between 
600-700 people were present. 

Mrs. George Leahy, the president of 
the association of the Elmhurst Alum- 
nae, was assisted by Miss Dempsey of 
Brookline. Miss Carmichael of Lowell. 
Mrs. H. V. Cunningham. Miss Ida Fitz- 
gerald, Mrs. Neil Tracy and Mrs. W. 
J. O’Reilley. Miss Marie San Sourci 
had charge of the candy table, and 
Mrs. James Carr of Lowell of the ice 
cream, grabs in charge of Mrs. Lynch 
of Providence, refreshments of Mrs. 
Nagle and Mrs. M. Cunniff of Brook- 
line. 

The bridge tables which were very 
popular were in charge of Mrs. N. 
Boylston, Beacon street. Brookline. 
Miss Alice Murray of Dorchester di- 
rected the dancing in the garage, and 
the Misses Kent of Newton Centre 
looked after the transportation. 

The midway with the ponies under 
the charge of Mrs. Frank Flannigan 
made a great hit with the children. 

The estate, in the beauty of its peo- 
nies and roses, made an ideal setting 
for a lawn party, and all present hud 
a good time. 


— Mrs. Lewis E. Coffin has gone to 
her cottage at Duxbury, Mass. 

— Miss Helen F. Elms received the 
degree of A.B. this week at RadclifTe 
College. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Elmer L. Gibbs of 
Hunnewell avenue are entertaining 
relatives this week. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Franklin E. Smith 
of Fairmont avenue are at their sum- 
mer home at East Sandwich for the 
summer. 

— Lieut. Philip H. Burt, of Charles- 
hank road, who has been stationed at 
Neufchateau. Dept, of Vosges, France, 
for several months, was appointed 
motor transport officer the first of 
June and has since been promoted 
from second to first lieutenant. 

— Invitations have been issued by 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel S. Crocker of 
Elmwood street for the marriage of 
their daughter, Margaret and Mr. Syd- 
ney T. Knott, the ceremony to take 
place at the Unitarian Church in 
Barnstable on Saturday evening, June 
28. and will be followed by a recep- 
tion at the summer home of the bride 
in that town. 


Shows Smallness of Soul. 

Tho man who cannot forgive a 
wrong, like a dog oppressed of a bru- 
tal master, cannot claim superiority 
of soul. 


FUNNY NOTIONS 
ABOUT Y.M.C.A. 


The Canteen Produces a Strange 
Crop of Fables — Ludicrous 
Misunderstandings. 

The war has brought the Y. M. C. 
A. Into world prominence. Because of 
this prominence, constant questions 
have arisen with reference to It in 
the minds of the uninformed and 
some most ludicrous statements have 
been passed about. 

For instance, we have it on the 
word of n good friend, former secre- 
tary of the Y. M. C. A., that a soldier 
in one of the southern camps came 
to him to express his appreciation of 
all that the Y had done for him, and 
said that he was doing all he could 
to help the "Y." Some one asked him 
what ne was doing, and hl3 reply was 
that he bought all his postage stamps 
there, and it developed that he really 
thought the Y. M. C. A. made a profit 
from vhe sale of postage stamps 
which they sold In such enormous 
Quantities to the soldiers as a matter 
of convenience. 

Another ridiculous assertion on the 
part of men who have come In con- 
tact with the Y. M. C. A. for the first 
time, emanates from overseas, and 
we hear the statement, in all serious- 
ness by somebody who professes to 
know, that the Y. M. C. A. Is making 
a great deal of money from its can- 
teen and is even over-charging the 
soldiers. Of course, the story would 
not be complete without Inventing 
son\e way of utilizing these alleged 
large earnings from the canteen. In 
some cases the story goes that the 
local Y. M. C. A.’s back home receive 
the profits from the canteen, in other 
cases the story has been solemnly 
passed about that the Y. M. C. A. was 
a great stock corporation and that 
its stock was paying big dividends, 
on account of the canteen earnings. 
The inventor of the Rtory did not, of 
course, understand the difference be- 
tween a voluntary religious corpora- 
tion and a stock corporation for busi- 
ness purposes. 

On the- other hand some of the folks' 
back home have contributed to the 
first Y. M. C. A. drive, expecting that 
the Y. M. C. A. gave away everything 
the soldier needed, falling to realize 
that the sums contributed to Y. M. C. 
A war work If used In that way 
would be but a proveiblal drop in the 
bucket. The Y. M. C. A. did give 
away vast quantities of supplies, 
such as tobacco, hot cocoa, chocolate, 
etc., to men In the front line trenches 
and those coming back from battle, 
but the great bulk of the money con- 
tributed was used for the wonderful 
service program of the Y. M. C. A. 

The canteen received none of this 
money, that department being han- 
dled entirely for the government on 
borrowed capital on a flat cost turn 
over basis, as a convenience to the 
men who could not get those supplies 
ip. any other way. 

Another strange statement was to 
the efTect that "Y” secretaries did not 
brave the dangers of the front line but 
stayed safely in the rear. Of course 
they were in the rear, because that 
was wnere most of our army was. 
They were, however, in the front line 
and went over the top with our boys. 
Witness the hazards that have over- 
taken some of our own New England 
men. Remember the story of Edward 
Sherman of West Roxbury, who 
served In the “Y” outfit of the Second 
Division, who saw his bunkie, James 
Birchby, given his orders to go West 
by a machine gun bullet. Sherman, 
himself, sampled two kinds of gas. 
and lay in a hospital for weeks. Harry 
Chase of South Braintree Just re- 
turned from France with the marks of 
exhausting service and exposure to 
the acids of war In his face. It was 
arsenic pas that almost finished his 
career as a "Y" secretary. In the 
October drive he w* driven back by 
shell fire from taking supplies to an- 
other secretary who was killed in 
the same drive. Voorhees of Hart- 
ford came home to die of his wounds. 
Solon Borglum of Connecticut, and 
eleven other "Y” m*»n received the 
Croix do Guerre, and two more were 
cited for that decoration. Henry 
Smith of Beverly. Mass., was badly 
wounded on October 16; Rev. Joel 
Metcalf of Winchester, Mass., with 
the 3rd Division, was gassed the 
same day. We wonder where these 
“Y” secretaries "met up” with the 
bullets, gas. and shells If not In the 
danger zone. 

Perhaps the funniest part of all 
these ludicrous misunderstandings is 
the fact that some of our most intelli- 
gent people here at home, hear them; 
accept them without question and 
pass them on. 

This Is a funny world. 


THE Y’s INFINITE VARIETY. 

Purls, February — The many-sided- 
ness of the work of the Y. M. C. A. 
In France was illustrated recently at 
a conference of forty of Its secretar- 
ies at Dijon. Those present Included 
one movie expert, seven ministers, 
five professors, a city water tax col- 
lector, a lawyer, four merchants, one 
economics expert, a weaver, two ath- 
letic directors, a plumbing contractor, 
an actor, two bookkeepers, two hank- 
ers. a corporation treasurer, a doctor, 
an lnuurance agent, a church organ- 
ist, a business analyst and only five 
'*Y“ secretaries. And only six "Y” de- 
partments were represented In this 
collection. 


TOMATO PLANTS and 
CABBAGE PLANTS 
Both Early and Late Varieties at 
NEWTON ROSE CONSERVATORIES 
R. C. Brldgham, Prop 
829 Newtonville Avenue 
Newtonylllo 

Telephone Newton North 401 


Newton 

— Miss Georgia Emery haB gone to 
JafTrey, N. H., for the summer. 

Telephone MacLean, 726 or 2654-M 
North, for anything in the carpenter 
line. advt. 

— Mrs. Harry Lutz is entertaining 
her sister, Miss Justina Smith of 
Texas. 

— Miss -Martha Lathe of Vernon 
Court is spending a week at Province- 
town Mass 

—Mr. and Mrs. VV. T. Davis of Carle- 
ton street are visiting relatives in Pet- 
erboro, N. H. 

— Dr. George F. Fair of Washington 
stteet is spending the week end in the 
White Mountains. 

— Dr. and Mrs. L. H. Naylor of Hun- 
newell avenue have returned from 
their wedding trip. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George T. Buffum of 
Vernon Court, are at Squirrel Island, 
Me., for the summer. 

— Mr. Frank I. Peckham is one of 
the Incorporators In the Ames Agricul- 
tural Implement Co. of Boston. 

— Mrs. J. Q. A. Whittemore of Wash- 
ington street is at “The Moorings," her 
summer home at Buzzards Bay. 

— Mr. and Mrs. C. K. Bacon of Wa- 
terston road have gone to their sum- 
mer home at Humarock, Mass. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Whitcomb 
of Centre street left this week for 
their summer home at Megansett. 

— Miss Marion G. McCarthy gradu- 
ated this week from the School of Sec- 
retarial Studies at Simmons College. 

— The Newton Olympia Company, 
has been incorporated for general 
amusements with a capital of $100,000. 

— Miss Catherine Patton was one of 
the junior ushers, who carried the ivy 
chain at Smith College graduation this 
week. 

— Among the graduates this week 
from the School for Store Service at 
Simmons College was Miss Beatrice S. 
Woodman. 

— Among the graduates this year 
from Wellesley College with the de- 
gree of bachelor of arts was Miss 
Eleanor Dodge of this village. 

— Miss Cora Scofield and her mother 
of the Hollis have gone to Kennebunk 
for ten days. Later they will go to 
Saebury Inn, York Harbor, Me. 

—Mrs. Walter H. Pulsifer, formerly 
of Clyde street. Newtonville, and 
daughter Helen, are visiting Mrs. I. S. 
Dillingham. Jr., of Church street. 

— A most delightful party was held 
last Saturday afternoon on the 
grounds of Grace Church for the chil- 
dren whose names are on the font roll 
and their mothers. 

— The Garden Club through Its play 
“The Butterflies’ Carnival" given last 
week on the grounds of Mrs. Frank 
M. Ferrin, Hunnew.Qll avenue, cleared 
$75 for the Floating Hospital. 

— Miss Olive E. Forknall, who grad- 
uated this week as a nurse from the 
Blackstone Hospital, Pawtucket, R.I., 
has entered the Worcester City Hospi- 
tal for a post graduate course. 

— Miss Hannah A. Keeffe died last 
Sunday at her home on Chapel street 
after an illness of several months. 
Miss Keeffe. who was born in this city, 
58 years ago, was a dressmaker by 
trade. 

— The large apartment hotel, con- 
taining 12 modern suites, numbered 
337 Washington street, has been sold 
to Harry R. Cummings. It occupies 
5600 sq. ft. of land and there Is a total 
assessed value of $40,000. 

— At the annual meeting last Satur- 
day of the Middlesex club, Messrs. 
Frank W. Stearns and Joseph B. 
Jamieson were elected to the execu- 
tive committee and Hon. Samuel L. 
Powers as a member of the advisory 
board. 

— Through an oversight, the names 
of those who took the part of the blue- 
birds in the school pageant last week, 
at Farlow park, were omitted from our 
last issue. They were Anna Volpe, 
Marion Melius, Elizabeth Russell and 
Mary Robinson. 

— At the closing exercises of the 
Sunday School of Grace Church Mr. 
Ford, Superintendent of the Sunday 
School for many years, who is leaving 
to go to New York received a silver 
cup and a purse In recognition of his 
faithful services to the Sunday School. 

— "The Hoodoo,” a three-act farce 
was given last night in the Stearns 
School Hall for the benefit of the No- 
nantum Welcome Home Fund. The 
following were included in the cast: 
Edgar J. Livingston, Hugh S. Boyd. 
William G. Dalton, Emile Cyr, John 
Dunleavy, Alphonse Lacroix. Mercedes 
Valley, Helen Murnaghan, Julia Fahey, 
Katheryn Broderick. Ruth Stubbert, 
Martha Dunleavy, Mary H. Hughes, 
Juliette Champagne. Cecile Cham- 
pagne, Margaret Miskella, J. Louis 
Fried, Charles Lacroix, Merilda Frech- 
ette. Ernestine Frechette, and Gilbert 
Champagne. After the play dancing 
followed. 

— The Directors of the Newton Vaca- 
tion Week return hearty thanks to the 
fifty four people who have contributed 
to the Fund for summer cheer. About 
one hundred dollars Is still needed, to 
carry on the work already planned. 
One dollar will give a delightful day 
at the beach to three sickly children. 
Two dollars will pay the travelling ex- 
penses of a worn out sewing girl to 
visit friends where she can be enter- 
tained free of charge. Five dollars will 
pay a boy’s hoard for a week at. a hoy’s 
camp, where he will be under good in- 
fluences. Ten dollars will give a tired 
working woman two v.eeks in a restful 
homelike retreat, and send her back 
to her work, refreshed and invigorated 
for another year of toil. Donations, 
Jurge or small, muy be sent to Eliza- 
beth Spear, chairman, 89 Walnut park, 
or to any of the directors of the work. 



WEDDING GIFTS 


In 

Cut Glass and Rock Crystal 
Best Values In Boston 
*"*41 SUMMER ST BOSTON ** 


WHAT THE Y.M.C.A. 
DID IN FRANCE 


Dr. Woods Hutchinson, Well- 
Known Scientist, Praises Wel- 
fare Work Overseas. 


Two things especially struck me 
during my year along the western 
fronts, what the "Y” had done for the 
war, which was beyond all praise, 
and second, what the war had done 
for the "Y,” which was scarcely less. 
I should feel ashamed of myself If 1 
didn’t speak out and add my mite to 
clearing up this cloud of superficial 
criticism which has been allowed to 
overshadow the magnificent achieve- 
ment of the Y. M. C. A. 

Most of the criticism against the 
"Y” as brought back and written 
home bv our boys in France seems 
based on comparatively superficial 
charges. I have not the slightest hes- 
itation in saying that if all the com- 
plaints were true, the balance in 
favor of the soldier would still be 
ninety-nine percent of the entire war 
service performed by the Y. M. C. A. 
Its work as I saw it from Belgium to 
the Adriatic, and from the home 
training camps to the front line 
trenches was simply magnificent. 
While, of course, mistakes were 
made, they were on the whole fewer 
than those of most other organiza- 
tions operating under such difficult 
circumstances, not excepting the mil- 
itary authorities. 

In ray judgment, It was the ( 'Y" 
and Its splendid army of volunteer 
minister workers that "saved the 
face" of the earth in this war. It was 
practical Christianity in action and 
did more to humanize the church and 
:elegate creed and rituals to the back 
shelves than anything that has hap- 
pened In fifty years. 

These grave, quiet, bravely cheer- 
ful and happy, simple-minded boys of 
curs, who looked like Cherubs and 
fought like devils, had already made 
the supreme sacrifice, had offered 
their lives to make the world safe for 
their loved ones and for the children 
cf the future. "Greater love hath no 
man than this, that a man will lay 
down his life for his friend.’’ There 
was no crucifix that could be held be- 
fore those boys that they had to look 
up to see. 

It was the bravest, gayest, most 
loyal, justest and kindliest brother- 
hood I was ever admitted to, and 
they're going to tear this gray, 
greedy, selfish old world of ours at 
home lo bits and make it over again 
nnd better. And God be with them In 
their crusade and God help anyone 
who stands in their way! 

Through them a great humanizing 
process began, by which the Y. M. C. 
A. has been fairly transformed, with 
a splendid augury for greater and 
more efficient service In the future 
than It has ever performed in the 
l ast. Its programme was early rec- 
ognized as essential to military ef- 
ficiency and I violate no secrets of 
the military authorities, not only of 
the American army but also of the 
French and Italian armies as well, 
when I say that the "Y” programme 
could not have been dispensed with 
except at the cost of prolonging the 
war anJ delaying the victory. 

And I may add that they seriously 
considered the possibility of organiz- 
ing some other force to do thin work 
In the camps, and ended by turning 
everything over the Y. M. C. A. and 
giving the Association carte blanche 
and hearty support. The French 
looked at it for months askance on 
account of the ”C” In the name, but 
ended by asking for 1,000 French- 
speaking American secretaries and 
their sraffs. And although the “Y” 
was already burdened by the service 
demanded of It in the American Ex- 
peditionary Forces, the response was 
in the affirmative and today the "Y” 
supervises the operation of 1,500 
Foyers du Soldat In the French army. 
The Italians did the same and more 
than 250 American workers are now 
In Italy, where three times that num- 
ber of natives have been assigned to 
assist In the carrying on of the *‘Y” 
programme and operate It when the 
Americans withdrew. 

I saw the "Y” in operation from 
Belgium all the way across the west- 
ern front, on the two fronts in Italy, 
on the Isonze, and in the mountains 
of the Trentino. By its casualty list 
one may estimate the ser*see which 
the workers rendered In the most 
dangerous sectors. Nine dead by 
shell lire and gas, a total of 109 cas- 
ualties, 54 of whom died, 12 men 
awarded the Croix de Guerre, two 
cited for the same honor, 10 given the 
Distinguished Service Cross, — these 
figures tell a story of heroic service. 

So vitally and pricelessly valuable 
was Its work In keeping up the mo- 
rale of the troops that the German 
General Staff declared It a combatant 
and ordered Its front line stations and 
huts shelled Just as it did the dress- 
ing stutions and field hospitals. 

This work at the front was spec- 
tacular, the kind that newspaper 
readers like to read about. But the 
routine work in the ports. In the 
trulning and concentration camps and 
In the great leave areas was even 
more uaslcally important. 

The "Y” programme repulsed the 
greatest enemy of un army, the bore- 
dom that settles over fighting forces 
between battles and over such 
branches as the S. (>. 8. and as such 
wus a great war- winning contribu- 
tion. The "Y” guve the soldier a 
home, a club, a library, u concert 
1 all, u church, a theatre, and un uth- 
lctlc field and stadium, but first, last, 
and best of ull — a Home. 


— Mr. Moses Clark is closing his 
house on Orchard street. 

— Miss Mary Fox of Washington 
street has gone to Jaffrey, N. H. 

— Mr. George Briggs has moved from 
Richardson street to 153 Charlesbank 
road. 

— Miss Maude and MiBS Hattie 
Henry left Thursday for East Glou- 
cester. 

— West Newton Co-operative Bank. 
Start an account this month. 1 to 40 
shares at $1.00 ear In, A*dvt. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Cummings 
of Breamore road are at their summer 
home in Greenfield, N. H. 

— Miss Southwick, who has recently 
been visiting Mrs. Wm. F. Hammett, 
has gone to Peabody, Mass. 

— Mr. Walter H. Kidder, a well- 
known baritone singer, will sing Sun- 
day evening at the Methodist Church. 

— Mr. C. H. Scovell of Grasmere 
street has purchased the Stewart 
house, 281 Park street and Mr. D. M. 
Stewart has purchased the house at 
269 Park street. 

— The Rev. Henry H. Crane of the 
Methodist Church started Thursday 
for a trip to the West. He will visit 
the Columbus Centenary returning the 
last Sunday in July. 

— Mrs. Sterling Elliott of Maple 
street and her sisters have recently 
returned from their trip of ten days 
in Washington, and will take an auto- 
mobile trip this week to the Cape. 

— Ralph Rodenhiser of Bacon street, 
while operating an auto truck last 
Tuesday evening ran into a street car 
near the corner of Centre and Pearl 
streets and was slightly injured. 

— There will be an open air concert 
and dance at the Stearns Playground, 
Nonantum, next Thursday evening 
under the auspices of the Newton Cir- 
cle and the Playground Department. 

— Through the kindness of a gentle- 
man of Newton the children of the 
Pomroy Home are going to a camp at 
Wolfboro, N. H., for the summer. They 
will start next Thursday in three au- 
tomobiles. Needless to say there are 
great preparations being made. Each 
one is looking forward to bathing and 
boating on the Lake which has always 
been a great favorite among pleasure 
seekers. 

— Mr. Henry Turner, a native and 
life long resident of this place, died 
last Saturday at his home on Jewett 
street after a long period of failing 
health. Mr. Turner was born 53 years 
ago In the house in which he died. He 
is survived by a widow and two sons, 
Messrs. Henry O. and Charles W. Tur- 
ner of this village. Funeral services 
were held from his late home on Tues- 
day afternoon, Rev. H. Grant Person of 
Eliot church officiating and the Inter- 
ment was at the Newton Cemetery. 


WEST NEWTON UNION SERVICE 

The usual union services for the 
summer will be held by the Congre- 
gational, Unitarian and Baptist 
churches, as follows: 

At the Second Church, July 27, Rev. 
Ferdinand Q. Blanchard, D. D., of 
Cleveland, O., and August 3, Rev. Jay 
T. Stocking, D. D., of Upper Mont- 
clair. N. J. 

At the Unitarian Church, August 10, 
Rev. Bradley Gilman of Palo Alto, 
Cal., and August 17, Rev. John Day 
of St. Louis, Mo. 

At the Lincoln Park Baptist Church, 
August 24, Rev. Kenneth C. McArthur, 
late chaplain of U. S. forces in France, 
and August 31, Rev. William Rut- 
ledge of South Boston. 



The policies of this meat market are 
controlled by the discriminating house- 
wife. Our thriving business has been 
builded upon the platform of women’s 
rights. Here Service and Quality hold 
sway. The choicest meats you ever 
met. 

WASHINGTON PUBLIC MARKET 

244 Washington St., Newton 
Next Door to Ginter’s 
CHOICE MEAT, POULTRY and FISH 
Telephone N. N. 27 1« 

Orders Delivered Twice Daily 


FORD MARKET CO. 

297 CENTRE STREET, NEWTON 
Telephones Newton North 61 — 62 — 63 A. J. Ford, Prop. 

United States Food Administration No. G 107544 

HINDS OF GENUINE SPRING LAMB per !b 42c 

SIRLOIN TIP and 1ST CUT OF RIB per tb 50c 

SIRLOIN and PORTER HOUSE ROAST per tb 55c 

SIRLOIN and PORTER HOUSE STEAK per tb 55c 

TOP OF ROUND per tb 50c 

CORNED TONGUES (Large) per tb 40c 

FANCY BRISKET CORNED BEEF per tb 35c 

LOIN or LEG OF VEAL per tb 35-38c 


Fresh Salmon 

50c 

Haddock 

12l£c 

Butterfish 

20c 

Fresh Mackerel 

15c 

Cod 

12Hc 

Lobsters 

50c 

Fresh Halibut 

40c 

Flounders 

15c 

Salt Cod 

25c 

New Potatoes $1.00 pk 

Bunch Beets 

15c 

NativeTomatoes 


Green Peas $1.25 

pk 

Green Beans 

15c 

Cucumbers 

15c 

(native) 


Butter Beans 

17^c 

Lettuce 

8c 

Asparagus 

20c 

Spinach 

25c 

New Carrots 

12> a c 

Rhubarb 

5c 

Peppers 

8c 

Squash 

7c 



Scallions 

5c 



Pineapples 


Strawberries 


Cantelopes 


Bananas 


Oranges 


Lemons 



WE CLOSE WEDNESDAY AT NOON DURING THE SUMMER 
SATURDAY AT 9.30 P. M. 


TWO DELIVERIES DAILY — 10 A. M. f 2 P. M. 

r. D-Mvzr.y to newtonville every p. m. 



HARDWOOD FLOORS 

*urquet*-y flooring and wood carpetH mod- 
ernize floors. UetlmiUeH given. 

WOLFSON FLOORING CO. 


42-44 MAIN STREET 
Tel. Everett 1710 Everett 




The Newton Graphic. 


VOL. XLVII.— NO. 41 


NEWTON MASS., FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1919. 


TERMS, $2.50 A YEAR 


SUCCESSFUL OUTING 

Members of the Newlon Board of Trade En|oy 
an Allernoon af Nahanf 


The Newton Board of Trade held the 
most successful outing In its history 
i on Wednesday afternoon when nearly 
a hundred business men of the city 
made an automobile trip to Bass Point, 

I Nahant. 

The party assembled in the early af- 
ternoon near the Newton railroad sta- 
tion, where they were greeted by Pres- 
ident John H. Gordon and Secretary 
Harold Moore and assigned to the wait- 
ing automobiles. 

The trip to Nahant took more time 
than usual, as President Gordon in the 
leading car, got off the track and led 
the procession into a cul-de-sac "some- 
wheres in Somerville” but all eventual- 
ly arrived at the Bass Point House. 
-The first thing on the program was a 
ball game, captained respectively by 
President Gordon and Alderman Ar- 
thur W. Hollis. It was some ball 
game, with Hughey Fogwill as one 
umpire and George Cox as the other. 
Capt. Gordon’s team won by the score 
of 8 to 5 or something like that, as no 
, one knew exactly how many runs real- 
ly came over the plate. The pitching 
of tantalizing drop balls by Billy Nu- 
gent being a large factor in the result. 


Alderman Hollis distinguished himself 
by actually catching a fly ball, but he 
was unable to explain how he did it. 

There were also a few races run off 
but the weather was too warm for the 
scheduled race between P. A. Murray 
and Street Commissioner Stuart. 

The banquet was a lively affair, with 
paper hats for every diner and inter- 
spersed with "Jazz (?) music” by 
Hughey Fogwill and associated crim- 
inals. Hughey’s leading was greeted 
with great applause. 

After the banquet which was served 
slow enough for everybody to keep 
their appetites almost intact, President 
Gordon insisted upon Mr. .Fogwill act- 
ing as master of ceremonies, and the 
prize’s were awarded to George Litch- 
field, Harry Ellis, Thomas L. Aiken, 
G. Howard Frost, Horace W. Orr, W. U. 
Fogwill, Charles Milliken, T. J. Sulli- 
van. and ‘‘Doc” Spaulding with many 
unique and original remarks. Tom 
Sullivan insisted in making a speech 
— the only untoward incident on the 
program. 

No record was kept of the time the 
party broke up or when it reached 
home. 


NEWTON EQUAL SUFFRAGE 
LEAGUE 


<• The annual meeting of the Newton 
Equal Suffrage League was held at the 
home of Miss Anna M. Whiting on 
Friday, June 20. After the business 
session the members listened to a 
very interesting talk by Mrs. William 
Tilton on the ‘‘Work of Today.” 

» The following officers were re- 
elected: President, Miss Jessie M. 

' Fisher; Vice-President, Mrs. Samuel 
L. Powers, Mrs. Lorenz F. Mlither, 


Mibs Lucy E. Allen, Mrs. William Z. 
Ripley; Recording Secretary, Mrs. 
Arthur W. Blakemore; Corresponding 
Secretary, Miss Kate Fox; Treasurer, 
Miss Martha L. Lathe; Auditor, Mrs. 
Arthur E. Viets. 


The beautiful Electric and Gas Ta 
ble and Floor Lamps on exhibition in 
the Showrooms of Messrs. McKenney 
& Waterbury Co.. 181 Franklin St., 
corner Congress, Boston, Mass., show- 
ing the largest variety of these goods 
to be found in this country. 


Newton Trust Company 

The advice and counsel of a Board 
of Directors composed of representative 
business men, eminently successful in their 
particular line, is a service at the disposal 
of every depositor. 


PUBLIC GRAMMAR SCHOOLS 

469 Diplomas Presented, fo Pupils ol Eighth Grade 
at Close ol School Year 


All of the grammar schools in the 
city closed this week for the season 
and 469 children of the graduating 
classes were presented with diplomas. 

In accordance with the custom of 
several years there were no special 
exercises at the graduations. 

The graduates from the different 
schools are as follows, — 

Bigelow School, Newton 


BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


SEWARD W. 
William F. Bacon 
Howard M. Biscoe 
Albert P. Carter 
Howard P. Converse 
James W. French 
S. Harold Greene 
Frank J. Hale 
Sydney Harwood 
Fred R. Hayward 


JONES, President 

Dr. Edward E. Hopkins 
George Hutchinson 
John F. Lothrop V 
Franklin T. Miller 
Frederick S. Pratt 
James L. Richards 
George F. Schrafft 
G. Fred Simpson 
Frank H. Stuart 


XOEXOC 


lODOE 


XOQOC 


STORAGE BATTERY SERVICE STATIONS 

THE ONLY NEWTON 

Official Dealers 

ALL MAKES OF BATTERIES RECHARGED AND REPAIRED 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

Daniel L. Kenslea Co. 

791 WASHINGTON STREET, NEWTONVILLE 

STARTING, LIGHTING AND IGNITION SERVICE STATION 


68 MAIN STREET, 
l onoc 


(Inside Service) 

30E=Z0E 


WATERTOWN 

loaoczz 


An efficient and courteous organiza- 
tion, presenting the best METHODS, 
FURNISHINGS ani EQUIPMENT, 
and serving direct at any point in 

New England 

wi.h select affiliations throughout the 

United States 

Offices, Chape!s and Warerooms at 
Boston and Brookline. 

(Centre rf (irrutd* Ho- ton) 



Diplomas were presented Tuesday 
morning by Mr. Everett E. Kent of the 
School Committee to 

Charles Elmer Barba, Jr. 

Ralph Frederic Bischoff 
Irene Catherine Buckley 
Marion V. Burgess 
Donald Bullock 
Frederick R. Chase 
Mary L. Clark 

Edward Townsend Corbus, Jr. 

Earl Addison Curran 
Edith Granger Cutter 
Mildred Chaloner Davis 
Katherine D. Elliott 
F. Marshall Fellows, Jr. 

Louis Feola 

Howard Porter Fitts 

John Joseph Geegan 

Donald Grant 

Abbot Gotshall 

Thomas Dine* Gotshall, Jr. 

Henry Gray 
James W. Greenwood 
Eleanor Collins Hart 
Elizabeth Loomis Hatch 
Emily Thurston Hesse 
Flora Spencer Hinckley 
Harold Holland 
* Jeanette M. Holland 
Francis Holt 
Charles F. Johnson 
Louise T. Keene 
Marguerite I. Howlett 


Rachel Jeanette Klbbon 
Julius W. A. Kohler 
Dorothea Krogman 
Alice M. Leahy 
Elizabeth Huse Leeds 
Nettie N. Lenkner 
M. Suzanne Loizeaux 
Doris Veronica Martin 
Harvey Macuen 
Francis Thomas McKeon 
Robert D. Meeks 
Elizabeth Hobart Millar 
Alice Louise Mooney 
George Alfred Moore 
Agnes Mary Morrell 
Mary Munhall 
Helen Louise Nagel 
Margaret Lillian O’Connor 
Eleanor Painter 
Harold E. Perry 
Alice Lea Ratcliffe 
Joseph D. Richards 
Eleanor A. Richardson 
Constance Sellman 
Catherine F. Shaughnessy 
Rosina Simeone 
John Roger Simpson 
. Miriam Spencer Smith 
Helen Louise Spring 
Royal Brant Swltzler 
Charlotte F. Towle 
Avis Trowbridge 
Isabell J. Turnbull 
Oliver Lee Van Dyne 
Avon Frederick Wallace 
Anna Geraldine Whiting 
Henry Delano Wilson. Jr. 
Francis Joseph Wolfe 
Robert Eugene Worden 
Francis J. Wright 


Honor Roll 

Constance Sellman 
Ralph Bischoff 


Roger Simpson 
Geraldine Whiting 
Robert Meeks 
EM ward Corbus 
Flora Hinckley 
Elizabeth Leeds 
Elizabeth Millar 
Mary Clark 
Katherine Elliott 
Howard Fitts 
Julius Kohler 
Alice Ratcliffe 
Rosina Simeon 
Avis Trowbridge 

Constance Sellman. Harold Holl- 
and. Donald Grant, Julius Kohler. Jo- 
seph Richards, Lee Van Dyne have a 
record of perfect attendance. 


Stearns School, Nonantnm 


The graduation of the Stearns 
School took place Monday afternoon 
at 2 P. M. There were songs by the 
school chorus followed by the recita- 
tion of two poems “Flanders Field” 
and “America’s Answer” by the senior 
class. 

The presentation of the class pres- 
ent, a picture, by Lesley Senior then 
took place after which the prizes an- 
nually given by the Daughters of the 
Revolution for the best essays on some 
colonial subject were presented by Mrs. 
Stephen A. Wiswell. Historian of the 
society. The winner of the first prize 
was Lillian LeBlanc. of the second. 
Stella Holmes, and of the third. Emma 
Bolsclaire. Diplomas were then given 
by Mayor Childs to the following: 
Bertha Bram 
Mary Elizabeth Brennan 
(Continued on Page 2.) 


REMOVAL SALE 


Now is the time to buy those plants since we are 
selling them at cost. Plants for Gifts, House or 
Garden. 

We have either got to sell or dump them since we 
are going to grow cut flowers at our Wellesley estab- 
lishment in preference to plants. 

We shall celebrate our fifth business anniversary 
this Fall by opening up our old store opposite the 
Newton Depot where we shall serve our customers to 
better advantage. 

Cotton The Plorist 

Mount Ida Street, off Centre St., Newton 

* Phone N. IN. 1-430 


NEWTON BOY SCOUTS 

Troop 2 of Auburndale Gives an Interesting 
Exhibition on Friday Evening 


Friday evening. June 20th, Troop 2 
Newton Boy Scouts, held its last 
meeting in the Methodist Parish 
House, Auburndale. Parents and 
friends were invited. The meeting 
began at 7.30 with presentation of col- 
ors and without any business proceed- 
ed to the work of the meeting which 
consisted of a first aid competition 
for the first aid kits offered by Scout- 
master Hilliard the first of the year. 
These first aid kits contain all things 
which are necessary for a scout in 
any accident which he might be near. 

The patrols in competition were the 
Flying Eagle. George Harding, patrol 
leader; the Bear, Cedric Valentine, 
patrol leader, and the P'agle. Charles 
Hilliard, patrol leader. The patrols 
carpe on separately no patrol seeing 
any other one do its work until it had 
done its own. 

The Flying Eagle came on first and 
in a very businesslike manner made 
stretcher on which they placed one 
of their number who was afterwards 
bandaged up until he looked as if he 
had been in a railroad wreck. 

Scout Walter then gave a very in- 
teresting and instructive demonstra- 
tion of resustication in cases of drown- 
ing and gas asphyxiation including 
the Shaffer method and the Sylvester 
and also the method employed when 
the ribs are broken so that no pres- 
sure may be exerted on them. 

The Bear patrol came next and re- 
peated the performance of the Fly- 
ing Eagle patrol. Altho their man 
who was bleeding from an artery 
would probably not have recovered 
they were on the whole much better 
than the preceding patrol and es- 
pecially good was the talk which went 
with each demontsration. Scout Fox 
was the spokesman and he showed the 
result of study in the clear concise 
way in which he told about each case 
and its treatment. Patrol leader 
I Valentine also skewed great skill in 
! the application of the spiral reverse 
j bandage. 

i The Eagle patrol followed and their 


THE SECOND CHURCH 

WEST NEWTON 

Services will be held in this 
Church at 10.45 A. M., every 
Sunday in July. 

Preacher next Sunday 

REV. J. EDGAR PARK 

All Seats Free. 


exhibition was very good, starting 
with a hike in the midle of which one 
of their number falls and hurts him- 
self on some rocks. They made a 
stretcher and then treated him for all 
sorts of injuries. In this patrol Scout 
Howland showed great skill in aply- 
Ing thp spiral reverse bandage. All 
of the boys showed the results of pa- 
trol leader Hilliard’s training. 

For a guide the scouts used Cole 
and Ernst’s “First Aid for Boys” and 
in each patrol there was at least one 
mother who was once a nurse. 

While the judges were coming to a 
decision an exhibition of signalling 
was given by Senior Patrol Leader Si- 
monds. Junior Patrol Leader Perkins 
and Patrol Leader Harding. The ap- 
paratus was an ardois set constructed 
by the senior patrol leader who sent 
the other two received, 
j After the signalling the troop was 
! called together and District Commis- 
sioner James C. Irwin awarded the 
prizes. Mr. Irwin and Doctor Henry 
F. Keever were the judges and their 
decision was: Bear patrol first 86 
per cent. Eagle Patrol second 79 per 
cent., Flying Eagle Patrol third 76 
per cent. The first aid kits were 
awarded one to each boy in the Bear 
patrol after a talk by Mr. Irwin in 
which he told about the achievements 
of troop two during the war. Some 
of these were 27 medals were won by 
members of troop two during the five 
Liberty Loans. Over $36,000 worth 
of bonds were sold. One ace medal 
with twelve palms was won by a mem- 
ber of the troop. This represents 
about $1500 worth of War Savings 
Stamps sold during 1918. 

Mr. Irwin also told about the dis- 
trict camp on Oak Hill and invited 
those present to go and inspect it 

Following this he presented the 
medals won in the fifth Liberty Loan. 
They were: medals to scouts Sisk and 
Bailey; first bars to scouts Walter 
and Henrich: second bar to Patrol 
Leader Hilliard. Mr. Irwin also ex- 
plained the absence of the ace medal 
and palms by the rush of work at 
| national headquarters. 

! The closing exercises included the 
pledge of allegiance to the flag. 


TO LET — Two fine offices in 
Newton Bank Building. Apply 
to flewton Savings Bank. 


HUNTINGTON 

School For Boys 

11TII YEAR OPENS SEPT. 30 

Summer Session of Twelve Weeks 
Opens June 23 

I'rciturpH for college* and technical 
■choolH ami offers special HiiIhIiIiir 
courses In business and technical sub- 
jects. 

22 college and universtly 
men teachers with at 
least 5 years’ experience. 

Unique plan of supervised study. 
Upper and Lower Schools. 

Unsurpassed equipment for 
physical training ami 
athletic sports 

IRA A. FUNNER, A. M.. Head Master 
320 lluntlnjctnn Avenue 

Boston 



HKVKNTV-SEVEN 
• YEA US OF EX- 
PERIENCE IN RE- 
NEW! NO uiul RE- 
PAIR 1 NO of ALL 
KINDS OF LEAKY 
HOOFS. ONLY 
FIRST CLASS work 
done ami CI1AROES 
ns REASON A DLL 

as CONSISTENT with the REST 
of WORKMANS!?!!'. 

CAREFUL ESTIMATES and EX- 
PERT advice sladly given. 

E. B. BADGER & SONS CO. 

75 P1TT8 ST.. BOSTON, MASS. 
Tel. Hay market 3700 


Gamp Aloha Summer School 

Squani Lake, Holdemess, N. II. 

Tutoring School tor Fall Examinations 
for School and College 

16th Summer Session Begins 
July 14, 1919 

Applications may be accepted up 
to September 6, hut early applica- 
tion and entrance is advised. 

Directors 

EMERSON A. KIMBALL, PhD. 
St. Paul’s School, Concord, N. H. 
EDMUND W. OGDEN, A.B„ LLB. 
60 State St., Boston 
For booklets and application 
blanks, or further information, ad- 
dress 

Gamp Aloha Summer School Association 

60 STATE ST., BOSTON 
Tel. Main 6559 Newton West 911-M 
Alter Jul) S, Call Vshlaml, N. H. 


Cash for Old Gold and Silver 

C. A. W. CROSBY & SON 

Jewelers 

480 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

W’atches, Jewelry and Silverware Re- 
paired by Experienced Workman 


Highest Cush Prices Paid 

For DIAMONDS 

Old Gold and Silver 
THE E. B. HORN CO. 

EsUS,’t9. 129 Washington St., Boston 


FnEDL.mFOIID.IIIG. 

Funeral Director 

49 ELMWOOD STREET 

NEWTON 


Complete Equipment for City and 
Out of Town Service 

LADY ASSISTANT 


Auto Hearse and Limousinea 


Telephone: Newton North UM 


GREGG 


Est. 1865 

GEORGE H. GREGG & SON 

UNDERTAKERS 

-The Old Firm” 

We are located in the 
Masonic Temple, 296 Walnut 
St., Newtonville. We are 
prepared to ansvwer calls in 
all parts of the City of New- 
ton and the Metropolitan 
district. 


Lady Assistant 


Carriage & Motor Equipment 

COMPLETE CASKET SHOWROOM 

Competent and Experienced 
Help at All Hours 
Telephones: 

Newton North 64—71259 


Genuine 


Columbia Grafonolas 

$20 and up 

July Records Now on Sale 

Burke's Drug Store 

The Store of Progress 
295 CENTRE STREET 
NEWTON 



STYLE AND QUALITY 

FEDERAL HAT CO, 

166 FEDERAL ST. 

NEAR HI6H ST. BOSTON 


DOLLS' HOSPITAL, Inc. 

Dolls of every description repaired 
«|kjW and all abasing porta eupplied. 
je' X- Sleeping eyea o specialty. Wl*» ro- 
rjfrA. curled. Teddy Bears repaired. Dolle* 
jfio Heads, Wigs and Novelties. Dolls* 
• w r Dressmaking Complete lino of 
| \ new dolls. Mall orders a specialty. 

37 Temple Place, Boston 
Telephone 1341-W Beach 


NEWTON CENTRE 

$ 8250 .## 


Stucco House, 9 rooms, 2 baths, 
modern, 10,000 sq. feet of land 


HENRY W. SAVAGE, Inc. 

Established 1840 

564 COMMONWEALTH AVE., NEWTON CENTRE 
Newton South 1640 



SAVING MONEY 

The SURE ROAD to HAPPINESS 


To attain happiness Saving habits are necessary. 1 WILL Save 
something — is a pledge that you can make in your own heart atul in 
keeping it you are building a stronger character as well as happiness. 
No form of Savings Institution can ser\o you more faithfully 
than ours. 


30 Years in Business 

START NOW TO SAVE 


Assets over $2,225,000 
BUY JUNE SHARES 


Watertown Co-operative Bank 

Main Office, 60 MAIN ST. Hours: 9 to 3. Thurs. Evenings, 7 to 9 
Branch Office, 569 MT. AUBURN ST. Hours: 9 to 3. Tues. Eve. 7 to 9 


High Above the Heat of the City 

As cool and delightful as the veranda of a mountain resort 

ROOF GARDEN 

HOTEL WESTMINSTER, Copley Square, Boston 


CILMOUR, ROTHERY & COMPANY 

Insurance Underwriters 


120 WATER STREET, 


BOSTON 


S T. ti.MFKV . NEWTON CWIWh 











2 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1011). 


IT'S 

BRIGHAM'S 

The delicious cream for summer 
dishes. It’s nice and tasty because 
made from the purest milk. 

We are not apt to think of 
cream as a concentrated food, al- 
though in reality, it’s equal to a large 
slice of meat. 

And oh, how much better it 
serves ! 

ORDER A SEALED JAR 
OF BRIGHAM’S CREAM 

Canib. 262 



PUBLIC GRAMMAR SCHOOLS 


(Continued from Page 1) 


Helen Cecelia Coughlin 
Alice Gladys Cnsteau 
lOstelln May Holmes 
Lorette Hermfne l«a Croix 
Lillian May Le Blanc 
Estelle Laura Lefevre 
Jessie Mary Leonard 
Eva Mary Masse 
Marguerite Catherine MacNeil 
Emma Meilman 
Ida Mielman 
Sarah Eva Mielman 
Doris Augusta Porter 
Exzelin Rita Rabitor 
Fiorina Mary Rossi 
Cecelia Mary Sampson 
Dora Shriberg 
Margaret Vassalotti 
Eleanor Mary Veno 
Albert Leo Bryson 
Stuart Dougins Carrington 
John Joseph Casey 
Henry Arthur Lnllemand 
Nazzareno Mazda 
Velma Perry 
Leslie Arthur Senior 
Herman Samuel Swartz 
Maurice Swartz 
Henry Joseph Vachon 
Horace Mann School, Newtonvllle 
Diplomas were given out by Mr. J. 
Everett Hicks of the School Committee 
on Tuesday morning. 

Kathleen Ahern 
Mildred Avers 
Muriel Bassett 
Cynthia Blake 
Muriel Burgess 
Dorothy Filene 
Elsa Haase 
Nina Harrington 
Lillian Lane 
Veda Leonard 
Elizabeth Linnehan 
Marion Maxim 
Mary Merrill 
Eva Moffat 
Gertrude Norton 


AUCTION 

SALES 

We held fifteen Auction Sales 
last Year — every one being suc- 
cessful — a record no other Auc- 
tioneer in this community can 
claim. 

Let Us Sell Your Real Estate 
at Auction. 

J. EDWARD CALIANAN 

Real Estate Broker and 
Auctioneer 

271 WASHINGTON STREET 
•NEWTON 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin, cred- 
itors, and all other persons inter- 
ested in the estate of Harriet A. 
Lockett late of Newton in said 
County, deceased, intestate. 1 
AYHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration on the estate of said 
deceased to Joseph F. Lockett of New- 
ton in the County of Middlesex, with- 
out giving a surety on his bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge, in said County of Middlesex, 
on the seventh day of July A.D. 1919, 
at nine o’clock in the forenoon, to 
show cause if any you have, why the 
same should not he granted. 

And the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished In Newton the last publication 
to he one day, at least, before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mein tire, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
thirteenth day of June in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and nineteen 
F. M. ESTY, Register. 
June 20-27-July 4. 

Notice is hereby given that the sub- 
scriber has been duly appointed exe- 
cutor of the will of Ann W. Lane, also 
known as Annie W. Lane, Annie W. 
R. Lane, and Annie R. Lane, late of 
Newton, in the County of Middlesex, 
deceased, testate, and has taken upon 
himself that trust by giving bond, as 
the law directs. All persons having 
demands upon the estate or said de- 
ceased are hereby required to exhibit 
the same; and all persons indebted to 
said estate are called upon to make 
payment to 

HERBERT R. LANE, Executor. ! 
34 Chauncy St., Boston, Mass J 
June 12, 1919. 

June 13-20-27. 


Notice is hereby given, that tire 
subscriber has been duly appointed 
administrator of the estate of Hannah 
Sullivan late of Newton in the County 
of Middlesex, deceased, intestate, and 
has taken upon himself that trust by 
giving bond, as the law directs. All 
persons having demands upon the es- 
tate of said deceased are required to 
exhibit the same; and all persona in- 
debted to said estate are called upon 
to make payment to 

JOHN SULLIVAN, Adm. 

(Address) 

44 Varnum Ave., 

Lowell, Mass. 

Route 3. 

May 20, 1919. 

June 13-20-27. 


Notice Is Hereby Given that the 
subscriber has been duly appointed 
executrix of the will of Albert A. Sav- 
age, late of Newton in the County of 
Middlesex, deceased, testate, and has 
taken upon herself that trust by giv- 
ing bond, as the law directs; 

All persons liuving demands upon 
the estate of said deceased are hereby 
required to exhibit the same; and all 
persons indebted to said estule are 
called upon to make payment to 

CORNELIA M. SAVAGE, 

Executrix. 

(Address) 

Brooks Ave., 

Newtonville, Muss. 

April 21, 1919. 

June 13-20.27. 


PAY STATION 


of the Tolepnone Co. will reverse the 
call for the asking when you want your 
Piano tuned by FRANK A. LOCKE 


CRAWFORD’S 
GARAGE AND TAXI SERVICE 

INC. 


Machines For All Purposes 
CADILLAC and FORD CARS 
ALL NIGHT SERVICE 

Best of Service and Ample Storage 
for Private Automobiles 

49 Elmwood Street 


Fred L. Crawford, Manager 
Telephone: Newton North 3300 


INSURE 

your 

FURNITURE 

with 

ROWE & PORTER 

(Sidney R. Porter) 

100 MILK STREET, BOSTON 
Tel. Main 7530 


Boston Elevated Railway Co. 

SURFACE LINES . 

Subject to Change Without Notice 
WATERTOWN STATION TO CENTRAL 
S<|. (Cambridge Subway) — Via Arsenal 
St.. 5.0& 5.22, 5.37. 5.52, 6.00, 7. 8. and 

5 in In. to 8.57 A. M., and every 13 inin. to 
4.07, 7 and 8 min. to 4.30, every 5 mtn. 
to 6.22, every 13 min. to 11.52 P. M.. 12.08 
A. M. SUNDAY 6.25, 20 min. to S.05 A. 
M.,*„ and each 15 minutes to 11.52,, 12.08 
A. M. 

WATERTOWN STATION TO NORTH 
CAMBRIDGE (Via Harvard Sq.)— 5.04, 
6.30, 6.45, 5.55, 6.05, 6.15, 6.22, 6.30, C.39 
6.47, 6.55, 7.03, 7.11. 7.17 A. M., and each 

6 and 6 inln. to 11.39, 11.46, 11.53, 11.59 

P. M.. 12.03. 12.14, 12.24, 12.30, 12.51, 12.57, 
1.22 A. M. SUNDAY 5.30, 6.06, each 15 
minutes to 7.06. 7.17, 7.32, 7.47. 8.01, 8.16, 
8.25, and each 7 ami 8 min. to 11.54 A. M., 
every 6 min, to 11. 1)0 P. M., 7 and 8 min. 
to 1 1.30, 11.39, 11.47. 11.53, 12.05, 12.14, 

12.24, 12.30. 12.51, 12.57. 1.22 night. 

NIGHT AM) KARI.Y MORNING SERVICE. 
Newton to Adums Sq. and Dudley St., via 
Mt. Auburn (by transfer at Harvard Sq.) 
12.12. 1.41, 2.41. 3.41, 4.11 A. M. Return 
take Harvard Sq. car leaving Adams Sq. 
12.35. 1.05, 1.35. 2.35, 3.35, 4.35 A. M. 

Take Harvard Sq. car at Dudley St., 1.39, 
2.39, 3.39, 4.39. 

CAMBRIDGE SUBWAY TRAINS. From 
Harvard Sq.. 5.24 A. M., to 11.51 night. 
From Broadway, 5.34 A. M., to 11.54 night. 
SUNDAY. 6.04 A. M., to 11.54 night. 

May 17, 1919. 

EDWARD DANA, 
Supt. of Transportation. 


Emily Scates 
Esther Stiles 
Dorothy Williams 
Perkins, Marjorie 
Edna Despin 
Crawford Anderson 
Winslow Aurvansen 
Francis Bradley 
David Broadman 
William Gallagher 
William Hannon 
Chester Hill 
Ward Hunter 
Henry Leonard 
Albert Lythgoe 
Gordan Stewart 
Lawrence Sullivan 
Bernard Kenyon 
Winslow Tuttle 
Arthur Sanderson 


rinflin School, Xewtonville 


Diplomas were presented on Tues- 
day morning by Mr. J. Everett Hicks 
of the School Committee. 

The senior class held a party in the 
Claflin School Friday evening at 8 
P. M. for their parents and friends. 
There was a song by the class, a piano 
solo by Mary Elizabeth Edmunds, reci- 
tation by Lavinia Smyth, songs by 



SUMMER COMFORTS! 

Vudor Porch Shades keep 
your piazza and sleeping 
porch cool and shady. 
Come in all sizes. We have 
the most comfortable and 
attractive porch furniture 
including lamps, chairs 
and tables. Prices are right. 
Wayne Cedared Bags for 
putting away winter cloth- 
ing — and evening clothes 
— guaranteed to keep all 
dust and moths from in- 
juring garments. Fine for 
furs and fur coats. 

BEMIS & JEWETT 

Newton Centre and Needham 


Merchant's Co-operative Bank 

19 Milk Street, Boston 

BERTRAM D. BL.AISDELL ALBERT E. DUFF1LL 

President Treasurer 

Money to loan on Real Estate 
First mortgages only Owner and occupant preferred 
Assets, $6,601,378.76 

Dividends for past year at rate of S l A% per annum 

BEGIN NOW TO PAY OFF THAT MORTGAGE 
June Shares Now on Sale 


, F. Anderson, Residence, 27 Wilmot St., Watertown 
Res. Tel. Newton North 1173-M 

A. B. Levander. Residence, 38 Gilbert St., Watertown 

LIBERTY MOTOR MART 

(Anderson & Levander, Props.) 

(Formerly Furbush Garage) 

Automobile Accessories, Etc. 

Auto Repairing of All Kinds 

Live Storage Cars for Hire 

12()B Washington 8t., West Newton 

Telephones: 1210 Newton West, 71299 Newton West 


Eleanor Tracy, piano duet by Gretchen 

Andres and Dorothy Smith, and the 
cinss prophecy read by Dorothy Sisson 
and Rupert Thompson. After a fare- 
well song by the class, there was n 
socinl hour with refreshments followed 
by dancing. 

The graduates were: — 

Randall W. Abbott 
Gretchen L. Andres 
George O. Barker 
J. Russell Barker 
Thelma G. Cunningham 
Suzanne Denrborn 
H. Stillman Drury 
Mary E. Edmunds • 

Ruth M. Fletcher 
Winslow H. Hartford 
Kenneth E. Kepner 
Francis R. Lewis 
Samuel F. C. McLaughlin 
Florence l’. Merritt 
John P. Nixon 
Edward Page. Jr. 

Philip G. Reed 
Douglas S. Rennie 
Ethel E. Saunders 
Joseph C. Saunders 
Dorothy L. Sisson 
Dorothy E. Smith 
Lavinia G. Smyth 
Marion B. Sumner 
Rupert C. Thompson, Jr. 

Eleanor Tracy 
Ethel A. Walsh 


Peirce School, West Newton 


The graduating exercises were held 
Tuesday morning, the speaker being 
Mr. Franklin S. Hoyt of West New- 
ton. former assistant superintendent of 
schools at Indianapolis. The diplomas 
were presented by Mrs. Harriet A. Pea- 
body, chairman of the School conimit- 

m 

This school won the grammar school 
base ball championship of the city this 
year. 

The graduates, 

Isabel O’Connell 
Margaret King 
Genevieve Margaret Feenej 
Frank Choate llinks 
Alice Kennery 
Alice Elizabeth McEnanoy 
Seby Joseph Caruso 
Joseph Bernard O'Connor 
Mary Grace Gianferante 
Ethel Elizabeth Pond 
Segvall, William Rnmsland 
Doris Katherine Lyons 
Dorothy Eleanor Pudsey 
Harold William Ramee 
Bessie Evelyn Crosby 
Kathleen Harvey 
John Guzzi 

Davis Holbrook Buckman 
Leora Helen Bacon 
Richard -D. Bolster 
William Field Parley 
Henry Green Crosby 
Edwin P. Slewing 
Mildred E. Emerson 
Thomas Joseph Green 
Reginald Edgar Holmes 
Phillips Bennitt Hoyt 
Phillip K.enpa 
John J. Lawless 
Charles Miller 
Minola Rosamond Moulton 
Patrick Joseph Mullen 
Margaret Alice O’Connell 
Loomis Patrick 
Alice Louise Phelps 
William Bowler Phelps. Jr. 
Eupliroryne Monflora Ryan 
ClilTord Eliot Smith 
Richard Frederick Stumpf 
Donald P. Frail 
Alice Kearney 
John O’Neil 
Nicholas Tedesco 
Charles Francis Tower 
James E. Larkin 
Aletliea Moore 
Dorothy Eleanor Weeks 
Charles N. Lucas 
Charles X. O’Donnell 
Walter T. Rideout 
James Carroll HefFon 
John Richard Sheehan 
Katherine Cecilia Keeley 
Lawrence Norton Clark 
Lora Alice May Ramee 
Catherine Delahanty 
Edith Catherine Showier 
Walderniar Valentine 
Arthur W. Blomendale 
Richard O. Bernard 
Walter G. Collagan 
Charles M. Deffely 
Maurice J. Foran 
Gaetana Gorgone 
Osurn J. MacLellan 
James T. Mitchell 
Florence L. Mittons 
Paul Reilly 
N. Douglas Mathews 


Charles C. Murr School, Aubnrndale 


Graduating exercises were held on 
Tuesday morning and (insisted of 
singing by the upper classes, and of 
the Commencement song by the eighth 
grade. 

Principal W. A. Leighton presented 
diplomas to the following, — 

’ Calef E. Alexander 
Esther M. Alexander 
Dorothy M. Barry 
Mildred F. Beardsley 
Eleanor M. Berry 
Alice G. Bjorkman 
Charles I). Bowler 
Sarah E. Brightman 
Lawrence Brophy 
Jacob H. Bulbulian 
Evelyn T. Cannon 
Roger H. Case 
Paul Chesley 
Doris M. Cole 
Mildred H. Cooney 
Arthur R. Delorey 
Evelyn L. Fahey 
Helen M. Fahey 
Raphael I*. Fox 
Charles W. Harper 
Edith I. Harper 
Myrtle L. Hatch 
Edith M. Heald 
William .1. Hcnrich 
Irene E. Hoban 
Louise It. Hoelscher 
Muriel Howard 
James F. Hewlett 
Murgret V. Jones 
Dorothea V. Keilar 
Carrie E. Kendall 
Evelyn 1). Keyes 
Lillian E. King 
Everett A. MacRae 
Thou .1 Malloy 
Georg. V Mayers 
Ruth C. Obormeyer 
• Dorothy Paine 
Grace Pierpont 
Mary E. O’Connor 
Phyllis K. Ripley 
Joseph J. Ryan 
Adele E. Sadler 


Elbe E. Scribner 

Harland P. Sisk 
Sydney R. Ussher 
Roger Valentine 
Charles Vallely 
Richard F. Walter 
Harold A. White 
Henry S. Wingate 


Hamilton School, Lower Falls 


Graduation took place Monday morn- 
ing and diplomas were given out by 
Miss Mabel Bragg, the assistant super- 
intendent, to, 

William Joseph Collins 
Frank Davis 
Leonard Frost 
Jack Housley 
Frederick Lowery 
Dorothy Cooper 
Annie Fessenden 
Eveline Hemeon 
Paul Harrington 


Emerson School, Upper Falls 


The Senior class held its class party 
Monday evening in the school hall. 
The class prophecy was read by Anna 
O’Shaughnessy and Robert Holt, the 
history by Leonora Bennett. The class 
voted to give $50 to the school for 
decorations. 

The graduation exercises took place 
on Monday afternoon, diplomas being 
presented to the largest grmluating 
class in the history of the school by 
Miss Mabel C. Bragg, assistant super- 
intendent, 

Joseph Bingel 
Lawrence Timothy Chilson 
Jacob Cash m an 
Henry Melville Heald 
Janies Richard Lord 
Wallace Vincent Macdonald 
Francis Pat McGuinness 
Thomas O’Hara 
Joseph Sadofsky 
Leonora Bennett 
Laura De Michelle 
Margaret Martha Driscoll 
Mildred Elena Hanscom 
Rose Issylino 
Nancy Nora Marshall 
Anna O’Shaughnessy 
Annie Picarelli 
Mary Scliiavone 
Alice Mary Temperley 
Miriam Lucile Temperley 
Ruth Marie Theriault 
Marion Lees Truax 
Hang Lee 

Edith Mary Ackroyd 
Fannie Boronick 
Teresa Hattie Burrows 
Helen C. G. Chilson 
Agnes Mary Cronin 
Leo Florance Crowley 
Mary Frango 
Theresa Frango 
Emily Grace Hodge 
Robert Holt 
Verona Agnes Issylino 
Margaret Elinor Kerrivan 
Paul Edward Kerrivan 
James Harold MacDonald 
Henrietta Helena Marcliand 
Arthur EdgaT Marden 
Florence Mary Meredith 
Frances Joseph Murphy 
Helena O’Hara 
David Meskell Osborne 
John Henry Pope 
Charlotte Whitman Temperley 
Lenore Margaret Walsh 
Mabel Foskett Wildman 
Alice Isabel Young 
James Regan 
Lillian Regan 
Annie Moulton 


Roger Wolcott School, Waban 


At the Roger Wolcott School gradu- 
ation on Tuesday morning, Mr. U. G. 
Wheeler. Superintendent of schools, 
presented the diplomas, and Miss 
Mabel C. Bragg, the assistant super- 
intendent, delivered the address. 

The graduates: 

John Andrews 
Wendell Bauckman 
Wilhelmina Boos 
Norman Briggs 
Charles Cotton 
Lawrence Durocher 
Minnie Elkins 
Ruth Hunt 
Dana Jefferson 
Alice Leach 
Mildred Marr 
Pearl McR#e 
Julia Murphy 
William Nqfth 
Mary Richards 
Chester Scott 
Edith Stahleker 
Frances Tate 
Eleanor True 
James Willing 
Truman Wilson 
Helen Winchester 


Hyde School, Newton Highlands 


The annual class picnic was held 
last week Wednesday at Nantasket. 

The graduation exercises on Monday 
morning consisted of class music and 
the presentation of diplomas by Supt. 
of Schools, U. G. Wheeler to, 

Doris Livingston Allen 
Grace Weston Allen 
Adeline Badger 
George Huntington Bailey 
George Rice Barker 
Elinor Beers 
Elsie Binnnll 
Evelyn Binnall 
Hilda Anna Boisclair 
Robert Fraser Boothby 
Grace Harrison Bradley 
Robert Aldrich Bruce 
Mary Josephine Burke 
George Florence Burns 
Helen Merrill Clark 
Richard Jenkins Coveney 
Alice Lincoln Dow 
Emma Doyle 
Dorothy Drowne 
Louise Winslow Dyer 
Virginia Hapgood 
Louise Anna Harris 
Eunice Estes Huntsman 
Frunklin Everard Jordan 
Paul Alfred King 
Dwight Woodbury Lewis 
Charles Peter Muclver 
Dorothy Florence McAduins 
Edward John MoDade 
Henry Stephen O’Brien 

(Continued on Puge 3.) 


M1LUNKRY SALE 

MLLE. CAROLINE 

Many of Her Exclusive Models 
Have Now Reached the Department 

$5.00 and $6.00 

No Two Alike in Form or Color 
480 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON 
Block of Brunswick Hotel 



“The REEL Surprise 

You will find it not only in the deliciously 
cooked dishes but in the actual pleasure of 
cooking them on the New Perfection Oil 
Cook Stove. 

For the New Perfection gives all the comfort 
of gas— keeps your kitchen cool even in the 
hottest weather and clean the year round. No 
kindling, no-ashes. 

Its Long Blue Chimney makes the clean in- 
tense heat— prevents smoke, odor or soot. You 
regulate the dame like gas— on when you want 
it, off when you’ve finished. 

The New Perfection Hot Water Heater gives 
plenty of hot water for kitchen, laundry and 
bath. See your dealer. Today. 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY OF NEW YORK 


NEW PERFECTION 

OIL CO QK\STOVE S 



BARBOUR & TRAVIS 


Insurance Description 

Real Estate^r 8 Vii5; ntJnf 

T. WALLACE TRAVIS 
Notary Public 
Jnstlce of the Peace 
Nat’l Bonk Building, IT. Newton 

Tel. 689- W 


PAXTON’S 

CONFECTIONER CATERER 

Weddings and receptions, 
catered to in superior ' style. 
Simple, and most elaborate 
menus sent upon request. 

Call Newton North 68 


Also Puritan Cook Stoves — . 
the best Short Chimney stove. 


BOSTON BRASS ANDIRON CO. 

83 HAVERHILL 8TKEKT 
Near North Mtutlon Entrance (up one flight) 
Telephone Klchmond 2374 


HARRIS E. JOHONNOT 

Electrician and Contractor’ 

136 PEARL ST„ NEWTON 
Order Office 392 Centre St., Newton 



We carry a large stock of Andirons, Fire 
Sets, Fenders ami Screens from which 
you may select patterns to suit 
any period of architecture. 


THE GEO. W. BUSH CO. 


BURT M. RICH, Proprietor 


Funeral Directors 

Established 1874 

Are Located at 402 Centre Street 


Telephones 


Newton North 406-M 
Newton North 46S-J 


▲ UTO HKAUHK— LIMOUSINE (JAILS 


BRUCE R. WARE, B. C. S. 

IM <11111(11 ST.. NEWTON, MADE. 

BOSTON OFFICE : No. 6 BEACON STREET 

Telophouc lluyutarket <08 0 

Public Accountant 

Ilooks Opened, Closed and Adjusted 
Auditing of Corporation and Mercantlla 
Accounts A flueclaltr 


Telephone 167 1-J Newton North 
TeL 176 Newton North 

Common wealth of Massachusetts - 
.Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Martha A. H. Tolman late 
of Newton in said County, deceased.* 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will and tes-' 
tument of said deceased has been pre- 
sented to said Court, for Probate, by 
Emma F. Tolman who prays that let- 
ters testamentary may be issued to 
her, the executrix therein • named, 
without giving a surety on her official 
bond, v 

You are hereby cited to appear at 
a Probate Court, to be held at Cam-’ 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, on 
the seventh day of July A. D. 1919, at 
nine o’clock in the forenoon, to show 
cause, if any you have, why the same, 
should not be grantod. 

And said petitioner is hereby di- 
rected to give public notice thereof, 
by publishing this citation once in’ 
euch week, for three successive 
weeks, in the Newton Graphic a news- 
paper published in Newton the last 
publication to bo one daj, at least,, 
before said Court, and by mailing' 
postpaid, or delivering a copy of this 
citation to all known persons inter- 
ested in the cBtato, seven dayB at 
least before said Court. 

Witness, Charles ,1. Me I nl Ire, Ks- 
qulre, First Judge of suld Court, til*; 
thirteenth day of Juno in the year dnJ 
thousand nino hundred and uinuteeu. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
June ")-27-July 4. 









TIIE NEWTON OBAPHIC', Hi I l)A V. JUNE 27, 101l>. 




CLEANSING 




At Its 


BEST 


AT 


LEWANDOS 

AMERICAS GREATEST 

CLEANSERS DYERS 

LAUNDERERS 

Packages Galled For and Delivered in the Newtons from Watertown Shop al Works 

Telephone 300 Newton North 

“You Can Rely on Lewandos” 

Boston New York Philadelphia 


MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF 
REAL ESTATE 


Under and by virtue of the power of 
sale contained in a certain mortgage 
of real estate given by Walter L. 
| Haynes and Jessie R. Haynes, his 
♦ wife, in her right, both of Boston, 
Suffolk County, Massachusetts, to 
Henry J. O’Meara i\nd John J. Mc- 
Carthy, as they are Trustees of the 
Bay State Development Company, act- 
ing under a Declaration of Trust 
dated June 28, 1916, recorded with 
‘ Middlesex South District Deeds, Book 
'4064, Page 163, dated April 30, 1917, 
and recorded with Middlesex South 
District Deeds, Book 4132, Page 231, 
for breach of the condition of said 
mortgage, and for the purpose of fore- 
, closing the same, will be sold at pub- 
J lie auction on the premises on Satur- 
E*day, July 6, 1919, at Nine o’clock in 
H the morning, the real estate described 
'in said mortgage, to wit: 

"The land in Newton, Middlesex 
County, Massachusetts, with the build- 
ings thereon, being shown as Lot 
Twenty-seven (27) on a plan entitled 
J "Greenwold, Bay State Development 
I .Co., Newton, Mass., July 1, 1916, 

J Charles A. McManus, C. E., revised 
I. December 12, 1916", recorded with 
1 Middlesex South District Deeds, Book 
of Plans No. 256, Plan 13, bounded and 
I described as follows: — 

Westerly by Mayflower Road, Flfty- 
| nine and 3-10 (59.3) feet; 

Northerly by Lot No. 28 on said 
I plan. One hundred nine and 9-10 
| (109.9) feet; 

Easterly by Lots Nos. 7 and 8 on 
I said plan, Eighty-five and 5-10 (85.5) 

| feet; and 

Southerly by Lot No. 26 on said 
I plan. Ninety-six and 5-10 (96.5) feet. 
r Containing 7725.8 square feet, be 
any or all of said contents or meas- 
1 urements more or less." 

* Said premises will be sold subject 
I to restrictions of record so far as now 
| in force and applicable. 

Said premises will also be sold sub- 
I ject to all unpaid taxes, tax titles, 
municipal liens and assessments, if 
I any. Two hundred dollars ($200) re- 
f (luired at sale. 

1 HENRY J. O’MEARA and JOHN J. 
McCarthy, TRS. of the Bay State 
Development Co., Mortgagees. 

For further particulars apply either 
I to the Mortgagees or to Swain, Car- 
I penter & Nay, Attorneys for the Mort- 
I gagees. Rooms 1111-1117 Paddock 
1 Building, 101 Tremont Street, Boston, 
JMass. 

I' June 13-20-27. 


MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF 
REAL ESTATE 


• By virtue of a power of sale con- 
I'taincd in a mortgage deed from George 
J C. Olson to the Fitchburg Co-operative 

■ Rank, dated September 5, 1918, and 
1 noted on Transfer Certificate of title 

I No. 9148, Book 61 Page 577 of the Land 
I Court Records of the Middlesex South 
| District Registry of Deeds, said mort- 
gage being filed with said Records as 
[Document No. 25008, and for breach of 
[the condition of said mortgage deed, 
I and for the purpose of foreclosing the 
| same, will be sold at public auction on 
the premises hereinafter described on 
Saturday, July 5, 1919, at three o’clock 
in the afternoon, all and singular the 
real estate conveyed by said mortgage 
deed, viz: A certain tract of land with 
the buildings thereon, situated in New- 
I ton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 
I and bounded northerly by Rogers 
I Street 38.59 feet; northeasterly by 
J land now or formerly of Josiali J. 
I White 131.20 feet; southerly by lot No. 
1 13 B on the plan hereinafter mentioned 
1*21.29 feet; and westerly by lot No. 14 
l-on said plan 101.84 feet. Said parcel 
I is shown as lot 13 A on said plan. All 
I of said boundaries are as shown on a 
[.subdivision plan, as approved by the 
I Court, filed in the office of the Land 
I Court, a copy of which is filed In the 
I Registry of Deeds for the South Regis- 
Itry District of Middlesex County in 
I Registration Book 45 Page 277, with 
I Certificate No. 6681. 

The premises will bo sold subject to 
I any unpaid taxes or assessments. 

■ Terras: $200 cash at the time and place 
I of sale, and balance within ten days 
I thereafter at the hnnking rooms of the 
Imorigagee on delivery of dead. 

| FITCHBURG COOPERATIVE BANK, 

Mortgagee. 

By John W. Parshley, Treas. 
■Fitchburg. Mass., Juno 10, 1919. 

Ijune 13-20-27. 


DEATH OF MRS. MURPHY 


A solemn high mass of requiem was 
celebrated at the Church of Our Lady 
in Newton, Tuesday morning, for Mrs, 
Mary Murphy, widow of the late James 
Murphy of Nonantum. Mrs. Murphy 
died last Saturday at her home. 

The mass was celebrated by Rev. 
Lawrence W. Slattery, pastor, assist- 
ed by Rev. Walter J. Roche, who act- 
ed as deacon, and Rev. Robert M. 
Mantle, who was subdeacon. The 
pallbearers were six grandsons of 
Mrs. Murphy. The interment was at 
Calvary Cemetery in Waltham. 


AIM(MmiNSU»lNCE 

AT COST 
' MW Pay Wore • 

MassoclxisettsMutuolAuto. Ins. Ca 
Automobile Mutual Liability Ins. Ca 
40 Central Street, Boston 


List Your 

REAL ESTATE 

with 

J. Edward Callanan 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 
AUCTIONEER 
271 WASHINGTON STREET 
NEWTON 


MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF 
REAL ESTATE 


Under and by virtue of the power of 
sale contained in a certain mortgage 
of real estate given by Earle R. Haynes 
and Mary A. Haynes, his wife, in her 
right, 'both of Boston, Suffolk County, 
Massachusetts to Henry J. O’Meara 
and John J. McCarthy, as they are 
Trustees of the Bay State Development 
Company, acting under a declaration of 
trust dated June 28. 1916, and recorded 
with Middlesex South District Deeds, 
Book 4064, Page 103, dated April 30, 
1917, and recorded with Middlesex 
South District Deeds, Book 4132, Page 
234, for breach of the condition of said 
mortgage, and for the purpose of fore- 
closing the same, will be sold at public 
auction on the premises on Saturday, 
July 5, 1919, at 9.15 o’clock in the 
morning, the real estate described in 
'’aid mortgage, to wit: 

"The land in Newton, Middlesex 
County, Massachusetts, with the build- 
ings thereon, being shown as Lot Thir- 
ty (30) on a plan entitled "Greenwold, 
Bay State Development Co., Newton, 
Mass., July 1, 1916. Charles A. McMan- 
us, C. E. revised December 12. 1916", 
recorded with Middlesex South District 
Deeds. Plan Book 256. Plan 13, bound- 
ed and described as follows: — 

Southwesterly by Pricilla Road, Sev- 
enty-three and 2-10 (73.2) feet; 

Northwesterly by Lot No. 31 on said 
plan, One hundred nine and 9-10 
(109.9) feet; 

Northeasterly by Lot No. 3 on said 
plan, Seventy-five and 4-10 (75.4) feet; 

and 

Southeasterly by Lot No. 29 on said 
plan. One hundred twelve and 7-10 
(112.7) feet. 

Containing 8268 square feet, be any 
or all of said contents or measure- 
ments more or less." 

Said premises will be sold subject 
to restrictions of record so far as now 
in force and applicable. 

Said premises will also be sold 
subject to all unpaid taxes, tax titles, 
municipal liens and assessments, if 
any. Two hundred dollars ($200) re- 
quired at snie. 

HENRY J. O’MEARA and JOHN J. 

MCCARTHY, Trustees of the Bay 

State Development Co., Mortgagees. 

For further particulars apply either 
to the Mortgagees, or to Swain, Car- 
penter & Nay, Attorneys for the Mort- 
gagees, Rooms 1111-1117 Paddock 
Building, 101 Tremont street, Boston, 
Mass. 

Juno 13-20-27. 


ROSE PLANTS and PANSY PLANTS 
nt 

NEWTON ROSE CONSERVATORIES 
R. tk Bridghnm, Prop. 

321) Newlonvllle Avenue 
Newtonvlllc 

Telephone Newton Norlli 401 


PUBLIC GRAMMAR SCHOOLS 


(Continued from Page 2.) 


Robert Ackley Patterson 
Evelyn Kendall Pratt 
John Lewis Reay 
Mary Elizabeth Reynolds 
Norman Wright Rogers 
Harold Robinson Smith 
Ritchlo Linglinni Stevens 
Jean Stoddard Stone 
Anna Bernadette Sullivan 
Ruth Ada Swail 
Edith Talbot 
Madeline Taylor 
Grace Marie Turley 
William Pierce Walker 
Howard Coolidge Weeks 
Doris Wheaton 
Charles Ernest White, 
Wallace Wilkerson 
Elsie Elizabeth Wilkie 
Howard Whitmore, Jr. 


Jr. 


.Mason .School, Newton Centre 


Diplomas were presented on Monday 
by Mr. Snmuel B. Paul, master of the 
school to the following, — 

Francis Angino 
William E. Appleton 
John D. Benjamin 
Patricia M. Bolger 
Eliot -Vernon Brickett 
James T. Chirurg 
Wayne Clark 
Catherine W. Clausen 
Esther Clement 
Hope Corken 
Caroline G. Cummings 
Mary J. Curley 
William Pitkin Curtis 
Philip E. Darling 
Elizabeth DeCourcey 
Silia M. Delrnonte 
John C. DeMille, Jr. 

Lydia J. Diluzio 
Anna Arminta Ernst 
Robert A. Esty 
M. Bruce Fisher 
Doris R. George 
Malcolm Gibson 
Ernest B. Githens 
Alice G. Golding 
Elizabeth A. Gordon 
Elizabeth H. Groves 
Walter T. Hannigan 
H. Winchester Hardy, Jr. 

Kathleen Huntress 
Edwin A. Kevorkian 
Charles Kimball 
Katherine Kneeland 
Doris Leatherbee 
Helen Leatherbee 
Flora MacDonald 
Katherine Marr 
Evelyn R. Marston 
Winifred I. McAleer 
Katherine E. McAskill 
Muriel R. McClelland 
Raymond L. McLean 
Gordon Miller 
Madeline E. Monroe 
John Mullen 
Caroline M. C. Natoli 
Howard Orrill 
Edmund W. Perry 
Rhoda E. Piper 
John K. Pratt 
John Richard 
Constance G. Rich 
Margaret Rising 
Edward S. Rogers 
Walter K. Ryall 
Virginia Sanderson 
Ellis Spear 
Elbert D. Stenger 
Katharine C. Stenger 
Major L. Stern 
Laura E. Stevens 
Elizabeth H. Sweeny 
Genevieve Tyler 
Marie A. Volante 
Edward F. Wales 
John J. Walsh 
F. Kimball White 
Mildred V. Whiting 
Margaret C. Williams 
Gordon F. Wing 


BASLEY LUMBER COMPANY 

NO. 19 CRAFTS STREET, NEWTONV1LLE, MASS. 

Will appreciate your business 
Spruce, Hardpine and Fir Timber Flooring, Sheathing 
Laths, Clapboards, Shingles, Siding 
Outside Mouldings and Finish 
Asphalt Slate Shingles, Roofing Paper, Etc. 
TELEPHONE NEWTON NORTH 3285 


MORTGAGEE’S SALE 

By virtue of a power of sale con- 
tained in a certain mortgage deed 
given by Thomas M. Smith of Boston, 
Mass, to Pearl W. Merrill of Cam- 
bridge, Mass., which mortgage is dated 
February 27, 1909 and is recorded with 
Middlesex South District Deeds, Book 
3426, page 207, for breach of the con- 
ditions of said mortgage, and for the 
purpose of foreclosing the same, will 
be sold at public auction on the prem- 
ises hereafter described, being the 
mortgaged premises, on Saturday, 
July 22nd, 1919, at 9.30 in the fore- 
noon, all and singular the premises 
conveyed in and by said mortgage, 
namely: — 

"A certain parcel of land with 
buildings thereon situated in that part 
of Newton called West Newton, and 
shown on a plan by Fuller and Whit- 
ney dated Sept. 29, 1878 recorded with 
Middlesex (So. Dist.) Plans, and 
bounded and described as follows: — 
viz: Beginning at the corner of Curve 
street and Auburn street at the south- 
westerly corner of the premises and 
thence running Northerly by said 
Curve street one hundred and sixty- 
three and sixty one-hundredths 
(163.60) feet more or less to land of 
James B. Heuly, thence turning and 
running easterly by said land one 
hundred and forty and seventy one- 
hundredths (140.70) feet to land now 
or formerly of Luther Bailey; thence 
running southerly by said land one 
hundred and forty one and sixty one- 
hundredths (141.60) to Auburn street; 
thence running westerly by Auburn 
street one hundred sixty-eight and 
forty one-hundredths (168.40) feet to 
point of beginning. 

This conveyance is made subject to 
a mortgage of forty-five hundred dol- 
lars to George H. Shields und Henry 
T. Richardson, Trustees." 

Said premises will be sold subject 
to suid mortgage for $4500 and accrued 
interest thereon; also subject to any 
and all unpuid tuxes, tux titles ami 
municipal liens if any there are. 
Terms five hundred dollars ($500) in 
cash will be required to be paid by the 
purchaser ut the time und pluce of 
sale, uml the hulunce in ten days 
thereafter on delivery of deed. 

PEARL W. MERRILL, Mortgagee. 

CHARI.ES S. HILL, Attorney, 

24 Milk street, Boston. 
Juno 27-July 4-11 


PAROCHIAL SCHOOL GRADUATES 


The graduation of the School of 
Our Lady took place Inst Sunday eve- 
ning nt 7.45 with solemn vespers in 
the Church of Our Lady. The vespers 
were sung by the children of the 
school. There was a large attend- 
ance. Rev. Fr. L. W. Slattery preach- 
ed the sermon and presented the di- 
plomas to the following: 

Grammar Depart nienf 
Raymond E. Boyd 
Edward P. Burke 
Kathleen M. Crowley 
Elizabeth H. Drennnn 
Helen G, Drew 
Mary G. Evnns 
Helen M. Farragher 
Sydney P. Fay 
Lawrence* J. Grella 
Pet^r J. Hart 
George V. Hennessey 
Adel her t F. Hurt 
Margaret M. Joyce 
Margaret M. Kelioe 
Paul Lucey 

Catherine H. MacLenn 
Amory P. Marchant 
Gertrude U. McCrudden 
Margaret McMullen 
Bertha F. Mlskella 
John W. Murphy 
Paul L. O’Brien 
Francis T. O’Halloran 
Paul M. Quinlan 
Anna L. Shannon 
Ruth Shea 
Irene Sullivan 
Paul A. Thomas 
Holman J. Wheeler 
Mary H. Wilkins 
Irene Buckley 
Kerri ns T. Conroy 
George E. Delaney 
John J. Doherty 
Catherine Driscoll 
John H. Fallon 
Catherine C. Farrell 
Agnes E. Frazier 
Francis X. Hanley 
Margaret H. Hayes 
Thomas P. Higgins 
George M. Joyce 
Charles F. Keough 
Nora A. Kelly. 

Lena’ E. Lupo 
Catherine M. Maguire 
Angelina M. Marchioni 
William J. McKenney 
John N. McMullen 
Margaret C. Mullan 
Thomas E. Murphy 
Helen R. O’Donnell 
Henry J. O’Rourke 
Margaret A. Ryan 
Mary T. Shea 
Cornelius F. Sullivan 
Edna M. Thomas 
Josephine Van Orden 
Evelyn C. White 

High School 

Four Year’s Classical Course. 

Margaret C. Finnegan 

Richard J. Leonard 

Three Years’ Commercial Course. 

John H. Barry 

Louise V. Bryson 

Louise G. Buckley 

Anna G. Connolly 

Mary M. Connolly 

Catherine F. Conroy 

Thomas J. Fallon 

Eleanor L. Gallagher 

Anna E. Hannon 

Michael J. Kelly 

Mary A. Kelly* 

Alice B. Kirchla 
Thomas J. Maguire 
Mary A. McMullen 
William J. Quinlan 
Alice M. Rourke 
Margaret R. Welch 


NEWTON FREE LIBRARY 


New Books 


Z I 


Booth, Evangeline.’ The war romance 
of the Salvation Army. UJX.B64 
Buck, C. N. A pagan of the hills. 
Carr, E. H., comp. A dictionary of 
6000 phrases; an aid to ready and 
effective conversation and t»> social 
letter writing. XM.C23 d 

Chamberlain, Allen. Vacation tramps 
in New England highlands. G84.C35 
Dickinson, Edward, comp. The stu- 1 
dent’s book of inspirations. Y.9D56 
Dillon^ Charles. Journalism for high J 
schools; a guide-book for students 
in conducting the school paper, and | 
in preparing themselves for news - 1 
paper work as a profession. 

ZCJ.D58 

Dillon, P. R. Americau anniversaries; 
every day in the year, presenting 
seven hundred and fifty events In ! 
United States history, from the dis- | 
covery of America to the present , 
day. F83.D5S 

Flynn, W. J. The eagle’s eye, a true 
story of the imperial German gov- J 
ernment’s spies and intrigues In I 
America; novelized by C. R. Cooper. 
Haines, H. S. Efficient railway opera- 
tion. HJR.H12 e 

Hay, Ian. The last million; how they 
invaded France — and England. 

F079.H32 L 

Hendrick, Ellwood. Opportunities in 
chemistry. LO.H3S o 

Hobson, S. G. Guild principles in war 
and peace. HG45.H65 , 

Lecomte, Georges. Georges Clemen- 
ceau, the tiger of France. EC591.L 
Lippmann, J. M. Flexible Ferdinand. 
Livingstone, W. P. Christina Forsyth 
of Fingoland; the story of the lowli- 
est woman in Africa. E F7751.L 
Marshall. Archibald. The Clintons 
and others. 

Millard, T. F. F. Democracy and the 
Eastern question; the problem of 
the Far East as demonstrated by the 
great war, and its relations to the 
United States of America. F60.M61 d 
Moorhouse, Hopkins. Deep furrows; 
which tells of pioneer trails along 
which the farmers of Western Can- 
ada fought their way to great 
achievements in co-operation. 

11EA.M77 

Myers, Elizabeth. The Bocial secre- 
tary. HKE.M99 

Nolan, A. W. Pig raising; a manual 
for pig clubs. (Home project ser- 
ies.) RKR.N71 

Pozot, A. W. Aristokiu. 

Reece, It. H. Night bombing with the 
Bedouins. F079.R249 

Itickenbacker, E. V. Fighting the Hy- 
ing circus. F079.R42 

Russell, Mury A. Christopher and 
Columbus. 

Smith, A. I*. II. Shears of destiny; 
a story of the first capture of Con- 
stantinople. 

Stephenson, J. H. Traction fanning 
and traction engineering; gasoline, 
alcohol, kerosene. THN.S83 

Trask, Kate. Without the walls. 

YD.T69 w 


Newton 


— Mrs. Wiley S. Edmunds of Farlow 
road has gone to Weirs, N. H. 

- Miss Annie Bluffer of New Orleans 
Is spending the summer at the Hollis. 

— The Misses Robinson r.re guests at 
the Hollis for Wellesley Commence- 
ment. 

— Mr. Nash M. Demirjian graduated 
this week from Tufts with the degree 
of B.S. 

— Mr. Robert Davis of Jewett sjreet 
Is spending the vacation at Wolfboro, 
N. H. 

— Mr. Charles H. Brady of Cabot 
street has returned from White Plains. 
N. Y. 

Telephone MacLean, 725 or 2654-M 
North, for anything in the carpenter 
line. advt. 

— Mrs. Henry O. Marcy goes Monday 
to her summer camp in the Adiron- 
dacks. 

— Miss Ella May Sullivan, her sister. 
Miss Frances Sullivan, and Mrs. Reil- 
ley of Washington, D. C\, are staving at 
the Hollis. 

— Mrs. J. Henry Bacon and Miss 
Florence Bacon of Oakleigh road, left 
this week for two months’ trip to the 
Pacific Coast. 

— Mr. Henry W. Kendal will attend 
the banquet of the Order of Cincin- 
natus held in Boston at the University 
Club on July 4th. 

—An alarm from box 117 Sunday 
was for a blaze in the chimney and 
roofing of the home of A. J. Davis of 
15 Peabody street. The damage was 
slight. 

— Miss Lewintlial and Miss Marcy 
will leave Tuesday for their camp in 
East Andover. N. H. Miss Linsley 
Dougherty of the Hollis will go with 
them. 

— xMisg Marion Agnes Niles, a former 
resident of this village was married 
last Saturday at Willimantic. Conn., 
to Capt. Frank T. James of Cambridge. 
Capt. and Mrs. James w’ill reside at 
East Orange. N. J. 

— The Garden Club through its 
charming play, "Tltania, or the Butter- 
fly Carnival" given on the grounds of 
Mrs. F. M. Ferris, 35 Hunnewell ave- 
nue have raised $100 for the Floating 
Hospital. This will pay for one bed. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Henry I. Harriman 
and family leave tomorrow, with the 
Misses Edith and Carolyn Fisher as 
their guests, for a month’s stay at a 
ranch in Wyoming. Miss Edith Jamie- 
son of Eldredge street joins the party 
in Chicago. 




Under Personal, ] 




SCO RT _ 

Including transportation, hotels, meals, Pullmans, side trips, etc. J 
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PARK, GRAND CANYON, CALIFORNIA, YELLOW- 
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Rate* Ranging From SUO.CO to CTftS.OO 
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Sfftl ttofc Journeys 

Our 64-Page Illustrated Travel Magazine 

Contains itineraries of tours leaving daily to Pacific Const, Great 
Lakes, 1000 Islands, Saguenay River. White Mts„ and all Eastern 
resorts. IT WILL HELP TOl' PLAN YOUR TRIP. 

Ask us for book that Interests von. 

Colpitts-Beekman Company 

Travel Specialist*, Railroad and Steamship Tickets Everywhere 

333 WASHINGTON STREET. BOSTON, MASS. 


WAR SERVICE DEPARTMENT OF 
THE NEWTON Y. M. (’. A. 


A Greater Boston Y. M. C. A. 
League has just been formed, the 
purpose of which is to promote the 
cause of clean athletic sports and to 
increase the healthful activities and 
entertainments for all Association 
men especially the ex-war service men 
of Greater Boston. 

A big feature of the League is the 
Baseball program for the season 
which begins Saturday, June 2Sth, at 
home. The schedule of games is as 
follows: 

June 28, Chelsea at Newton. 

July 5. Newton at Boston. 

July 12, Boston at Newton. 

July 19. Newton at Lynn. 

July 26. Cambridge at Newton. 

Aug. 2. Newton at Somerville. 

Aug. 9. Malden at Newton. 

If you want to play ball, here is 
yQur chance to enjoy some real fun. 
We need new players all the time as 
many of the men plan to be away 
some of the season. New uniforms 
for the team will soon be available. 

Mr. Alfred H. Whitelv. a man who 
is chuck full of baseball and "pep." 
has been appointed captain. 

We practice every Monday nd Wed- 
nesday nights at 6.30 sharp on the 
Y. M. C. A. field. 


Tel. Milton 2176-W 

HERBERT F. WEST 

PAINTING, PAPERHAKGING and INTERIOR DECORATING 

127 THACHER ST., MATTAPAN, MASS. 

First Class Work Guaranteed. References 


Tel. Newton North 3172-M EstabUnhed 1900 

Sam Bloom, Custom Tailor 

Suits Made To Order. Cleansing. Pressing and Repairing at Moderate Prices 

Fur T Remodellna a Specialty- 
Work Called For and Delivered Cea tract Pr«**ing 

307 Centre Street, opp. Post Office Newton 


PAI1 




MEANS 


QUALITY- DURABILITY- ECONOMY 


It’s time to think about 
protection for your House, 
also its appearance. Ask 
us about the above line of 
Paint, Stains, etc. 

Chandler & Barber Co. 

124 Summer St., Boston 


Common wealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin, cred- 
itors. and all other persons inter- 
ested in the estate of Lueretia R. 
Smith late of Newton in said Coun- 
ty, deceased, intestate. 

WHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration on the estate of said 
deceased to Charles B. Moore of New- 
ton. in the County of Middlesex, with- 
out giving a surety on his bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at 
a Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge, in said County of Middlesex, on 
the seventh day of July A. D. 1919, at 
nine o’clock in the forenoon, to show 
cause if any you have, why the same 
should not be granted. 

And the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the last publication 
to be one day, at leust, before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles .1. >1 elutin', Es- 
quire. First Judge of said Court, this 
eighteenth day of June in the year 
one thousand nine hundred und nine- 
teen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
June 20-27-July 4 


THE LOMBARDY INN 

boston; 

DANCING ALL EVENING 

Boylston Place, near Colonial Theatre 

Telephones Beach 2941-2942 
Wine Service Open Till Midnight 

LOMBARDY BY-THE-SEA 


NORTH SCITUATE BEACH 


Mitchell House 

OPENS JUNE 15th 


ANNUITIES 

have become a favorite investment 
for those desiring an absolutely 
sure net income without worry. 

ANNUITIES 

have certain desirable features 
with reference to Income and In- 
heritance Taxes. 

REFUND ANNUITIES 

of the Equitable Life have special 
features guaranteeing repayment 
to some one of every dollar pp.id 
in. 

RICHARD O. WALTER 
31 Equitable Bldg-, Boston 

Please furnish me information 
regarding annuities: 


Name 

Address 

Date of Birth 


REAL ESTATE 
NEWTONS!! 

NEWTON REAL ESTATE 
OlY.XERSs Our spring season Is 
here and we are having an un- 
usual demand for real estate of 
all kinds. Whether your house 
is for sale or to rent it will be 
to your best interests to list par- 
ticulars with us immediately. A 
card or ’phone call will bring a 
representative and expert ad- 
vice will be given gratis. 

We respectfully solicit your 
patronage and assure you per- 
sonal interest and active service 
—at all times. 

See Ts First! 

John T. Burns & Sons, Inc. 

363 CEMRE ST., NEWTON 
$07 Washington SU Newtonvllle 
Com. Ave„ cor. Manet KtL, N. C. 

Tel. 570-424 New, No. 


HIGH-GRADE CARS FOR HIRE 

New High-grade Cars with Competent Chauffeurs, 
by the Week, Day or Hour. Special Low Rates for Long Trips 
Let Us Figure on Your Season’s Service 
We Can Save You Money 
W. J. RIGGS & CO., 94-96 BROADWAY, BOSTON 
Tel Beach 803 


Painting, Paper Hanging 

Deagle and Aiicoin 


Estimates 
Cheerfully 
Given 

Telephone Day or Night 


43 

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Street 

1077-W North 


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Enter 399 Boylston St., Room 325 

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I 




4 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1212. 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC 

BMmd mk th« Toat-aOM a* timmU 
Mm*., m Mcomd-clMa BuOtar. 


$?.M> I>r Year. Hlnglr Copies, • Cent* 

By Mall. Postage free. 

All money sent at ■andar’a risk. 

Check* and money order* should be made 
payable to 


Notice* of all entertainment* to which 
an admission fee I* charged must be paid 
for at regular advertlelng rate*. IS cent* 
per printed line In general reading matter, 
er 2 5 cent* per printed line, under Tillage 
beading*. 


The editor will be glad to print all com- 
munlrattons, accompanied by the name of 
writer bearing on any matter of public 
Interest, except article* or letter* advocat- 
ing or opposing the nomination or election 
ef candidate* for political office, which will 
be treated a* advertising. 


NKWTON GRAPHIC PUBLISHING CO. 

J. C. Brlmblecom, Trea*. 


PATRIOTIC CELEBRATION OF 
THE MT. IDA COUNCIL 


The Mt. Ida Council. No. 1247. held a 
meeting Monday night at Dennison 
Hall. Newtonville, in celebration of its 
42nd anniversary, and in honor of its 
21 members all of whom enlisted for 
service, and all of whom returned to 
civil life. 

The regent, Charles D. Cabot, intro- 
duced Mayor Edwin O. Childs, the Su- 
preme Secretary. Samuel. N. Hoag, and 
the Grand Regent of Massachusetts, 
Herbert A. Billings, who spoke of the 
work of the members in glowing terms. 
After the speeches, refreshments and 
dancing followed. 

The members of the council who 
served their country are as follows: 
Ronald D. Birch. C. Raymond Cabot, 
Almon L. Crosby. Charles E. K. Fraser, 
Dr. Anton R. Fried, George S. German. 
James B. Harbison, Dr. Clarence M. 
Haskell. John B. Horrigan, Allyn W. 
Kellogg. John R. Knudsen, Joseph P. 
Melia, Duncan S. McMullin, Daniel D. 
O’Driscoll. Albert F. Rockefeller. Mil- 
ton H. Schoenfield, Barney Soldati, 
Thaddeus M. Swierkowski, John I. Van 
Buskirk, David Webster. Dr. Frederick 
E. Withee. 


PLAYGROUND NOTES 


yEATH OF HRS. WARREN 

Mrs. Cora B. (Cain) Warren, wife 
of John W. Warren, of 450 Winches- 
ter street, Newton Highlands, died 
last week Thursday, after an illness 
of several weeks. 

Mrs. Warren was 59 years of age 
and a native of Vernon, Vt. She had 
been a resident in the city for 30 
years. Besides her husband she is 
survived by two daughters, the Misses 
Gertrude S. and M. Almira Warren. 

Funeral services were held Satur- 
day at her late home. The Rev. George 
W. Jones of the Cline Memorial Meth- 
odist Church officiated and the inter- 
ment was in the Newton Cemetery. 


The summer session of the play- 
grounds will open on Tuesday after- 
noon. July 1st. The playgrounds enu- 
merated below will have men or wo- 
men directors, or both, every day from 
9 to 11.30 in the morning and from 
1.30 to 6 in the afternoon. 

The Stearns. West Newton. Newton 
Centre and Newton Upper Falls Play- 
grounds will have supervision until 
dark. 

The parents are urged to see that 
the children go to the plnygrounds 
when the supervisors can be expected 
to be there. This instruction regard- 
ing the time would be in the interest 
of the children. All playgrounds will 
be without supervision on rainy days. 

Besides the regular sports and usual 
games, special instruction will be given 
this year, in fist ball, slug ball, dodge 
ball, iron quoits and folk dances. 

There will also be special instruction 
for the younger children in occupation 
play. Girls Health League instruction 
for the girls twelve to sixteen years of 
age. and manual play for any of the 
older girls who are capable of instruc- 
tion in constructive play. 

List of playgrounds to be super- 
vised: Stearns. Allison, Boyd, Farlow, 
Horace Mann, Claflin. Cabot, Eden 
Avenue, West Newton, Burr School 
playground ( Auburndale) Auburn- 
dale, Lower Falls, Upper Falls. 
Newton Highlands. Newton Centre, and 
Thompsonville. 

If there are enough children in the 
Waban district, and the parents desire 
it, the Waban playground will also be 
opened. Thus far only about a dozen 
girls have signified their desire to take 
the Girls’ Health League Course. 

Four hundred girls have already en- 
rolled for the Girls’ Health League 
Training. This course is given in co- 
operation with the Newton Federation 
of Women’s Clubs, who have furnished 
a splendid and very complete doll out- 
fit for this purpose. There is a wash- 
able doll, with a complete equipment 
of clothing, a beautiful crib, and a 
complete set of toilet articles, bath tub. 
thermometer, etc. Also an equipment 
for sterilizing milk and taking care 
of bottles. This course teaches mother- 
craft and lays emphasis on the care of 
young babies. 

A book written for the purpose by 
Miss May Bliss Dickinson, R. N., will 
be used as an outline. 

The girl will receive at least one 
lesson a week. After they have at- 
tended a few” lessons they will receive 
a button, and upon the successful com- 
pletion of the course they will be given 
a diploma. 

The girls are not only taught the 
care of ba’bies, but also personal hy- 
giene and the rules of wholesome liv- 
ing. This course will be under the di- 
rection of Miss Gertrude Kent, a 
School Nurse. 


Swift For a Short Distance. 

Sparrows enn fly short distances at 
the rate of eighty miles an hour. 


Auburndale 

— Mrs. Carrie Gilman Edwards has 
gone to her summer home at Littleton, 
Mass. 

— Mr. Thomas J. Brown of Newton 
has purchased the house, 339 Central 
street. 

-—Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Hollis and 
family have gone to Scituate for the 
summer season. 

— West Newton Co-operative Rank. 
Start an account this month. 1 to 10 
shares at $1.00 each. Advt. 

— Mrs. Henry R. Nash, Studio road, 
is spending the summer at Point Rip- 
ley, Harrington, Maine. 

— Mr. L. B. Jennings has purchased 
the two apartment house, corner Rowe 
street and Auburndale avenue. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Skidmore 
of Central street are being congratu- 
lated on the birth of a daughter. 

— Mr. Frank E. Morse gave a very 
interesting recital with his vocal pu- 
pils at Steinert Hall last week. 

— Mr. Otto J. Damon has rented the 
apartment on Central street recently 
rncated by Mrs. Carrie G. Edwards. 

— Mrs. N. W. Dennett has sailed for 
France to meet Mr. Dennett, who is 
on a business trip in France and Eng- 
land. 

— Mrs. M. E. Beardsley and children 
have gone to Provincetown. where they 
are occupying their cottage, ‘‘Takeit- 
easy” for the summer. 

-The Church of the Messiah will 
hold its two morning services during 
the summer, the Rev. Percival Wood 
will preach during July. 

— Rev. Percival M. Wood of the 
Church of the Messiah presided at the 
meeting of the Mother’s Rest House at 
Needham Heights last Sunday after- 
noon. 

— Mrs. Arthur C Farley, lifter her 
faithful and very successful work with 
the Red Cross last winter is visiting 
her mother in Honolulu, Sandwich Is- 
lands. 

— The Girls’ Friendly Society of the 
Church of the Messiah spent the day 
at Nantasket Beach last Saturday. 
They were accompanied by Mrs. Wood 
and Mrs. Baldwin. 

— Money deposited in Auburndale 
Co-operative Bank goes on interest 
monthly. Interest is compounded 
four times a year,. La3t dividends at 
rate of 5^ per cent. advt. 

— The Epworth League meetings are 
adding to the population of our streets, 
and young men and women laden with 
suitcases are coming by trolley every 
day. all inquiring the way to Lasell. 

— The wedding of Mr. Charles C. 
Allen of Leominster and Mrs. Frances 
Woodland of this place, took place on 
Monday at the Church of the Messiah, 
the ceremony being performed by Rev. 
J. D. Hull of Leominster. 

— Mrs. Mark Ethredge of Calgary, 
Alberta, formerly of Crescent street, 
Auburndale. is here visiting her many 
friends, who are glad to welcome her. 
Her son Everett has just returned 
from overseas having served four 
years in th6 Canadian Army. 


^SERVATORlf^ 

ft. O. ■fttDOMAM, SNAtmtTOft 

330 NIWTONVILLR AVI. NSWTONVIULt, MASS 

FLOWERS 

For All Occasions 


DEATH »P >1 II. SQUIRE 


Mr. E. Burnard Squire, a resident of 
Auburndale for the past thirteen 
years, passed away on Sund&y, the 
22nd. at the Newton Hospital. A year 
ago he had a general breakdown, due 
to overwork. He rallied from this, 
however, after a convalescence of 
about six months at his son’s home in 
Spencer, and on the first of March 
actively resumed his business, but was 
again stricken two weeks ago. 

Mr. Squire was born in Boston in 
1858, the son of Rev. Edmund and 
Maria (Hincks) Squire of England. 
He was a graduate of the Boston Uni- 
versity School of Medicine, class of 
1879. and practised medicine in Lyn- 
donville, Yermont, and Boston, for a 
few years. He gave up his medical 
career to 'go into business and for the 
past seven years had been in the real 
estate business In Auburndale and 
Boston: He had just formulated plans 
for devoting his entire time locally 
and upon his return home had closed 
up his Boston office- and opened an 
office in the Bank Block in Auburn- 
dale. 

He had been successful in this business 
and his careful, thorough and honest 
methods of business had made a large 
circle of friends, and he had also ef- 
fectually brought about many difficult 
sales. 

He was of a quiet, retiring nature 
and a man who loved his work and 
his home. However, he was rtiuch in- 
terested in community welfare, hav- 
ing been one of the directors of the 
Auburndale Co-operative Bank, a 
member of the Newton Board of 
Trade, and the Auburndale Brother- 
hood, and, at one time, president of 
the Auburndale Village Improvement 
Society. 

He is survived by his widow, Min- 
nie E. (States), a daughter, Enid, both 
of Auburndale, and a son, Edmund H. 
Squire of Spencer. 

Funeral services were held at his 
late residence, 16 Washburn avenue, 
Auburndale, at two o’clock on Tues- 
day, June 24th, the Rev. Percival M. 
Wood and Dr. Edward Payson Drew 
officiating. Interment was in the 
family lot at Mt. Hope Cemetery. 

Optimistic Thought. 

Better hnve an open enemy than a 
sneering friend. 


NEWTON SAVINGS BANK 

INCORPORATED 1831 

The Oldest and Largest Bank in the City of Newton 

Deposit Now Interest Begins 

JULY 10 

The only Savings Bank in Newton paying 


AljtO Delivery Telephones j Newton North 149 Main Office, Watertown 

• ( Brookline 3199 

THOMAS JOSEPH McCUE 

Construction and 
Motor Trucking Contractor 


RETAIL 


WHOLESALE COAL 

264 North Beacon St., Watertown, Mass. 


Gutters, Lasters, Heel Shavers, Heel Scourers, 
Rapid Stitchers 

First-class operators on the above parts used to working on 
women’s fine shoes can get a first-class job by applying at once. Full 
time except holidays. Fifty weeks in the year. To encourage new 
workmen while they are becoming accustomed to our work, we will 
pay to skilled experienced men who come to work for us before July 
First and after they have been with us five weeks, a bonus of 
$50. Thomas G. Plant Co., Roxbury District, Boston. Strike on but 
no trouble. 


BUII.D YOUR HOME NOW 
AND 8AVE MONEY 
DO NOT WAIT until the building boom 
Is on, which is sure to advance the price 
of labor and materials. Let us show you 
the actual estimates, and how you can 
build this seven-room colonial house, with 
all Improvements, for $4200. Call and see 
the plans and see how we saved tho 
owner $1000 on tho cost of this building. 
Plans of buildings of every description. 
HITCHINGS & DITCHINGS. Architects, 
176 Federal St., Boston, Mass. 


PIANO TROUBLES 

i inuu i IIUUULLO FRANK l LOCKE. See ad 


Notice Is hereby given that the sub- 
scriber has been duly appointed exe- 
cutor of the will of Ella Augusta 
Soule late of Newton in the County of 
Middlesex, deceased, testate, and has 
taken upon himself that trust by giv- 
ing bond, as the law directs. All per-- 
sons having demands upon the estate 
of said deceased are hereby required 
to exhibit the same; and all persons 
indebted to said estate are called upon 
to make payment to 

HARRY D. CABOT, Executor. 
(Address) 

73 Tremont Street, 

Boston, Mass. 

June 25, 1919. 

June 27-July 4-11. 


HEY WIN *3000.00 

Recipients of Awards for the Twenty Best Condensations in Connection With the Post’s 

One Hundred Condensed Novels 

Will be announced in next Sunday’s Boston Post, June 29. The winners come from all parts of New England. 
Probably you have friends among them. The prize winning condensations will appear exclusively in 


Some of the Prize-Winning Condensations are announced for publication in the schedule 

that follows for the next three weeks: 


Friday, June 27 

KIDNAPPED 

By Stevenson 

Condensed by James B. Connolly 

Saturday, June 28 

GIL BLAS 

By Le Sage 

Condensed by Nathan Haskell 
Dole 

Sunday, June 29 

COUNT OF MONTE 
CRISTO 

By Alexander Dumas 

Condensed by Alfred S. Clark 

Monday, June 30 

HENRY ESMOND 

By Thackeray 

Prize Condensation 

Tuesday, July 1 

THE LITTLE 
MINISTER 

By Sir James M. Barrie 

Prize Condensation 

Wednesday, July 2 

THE WHITE 
COMPANY 

By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle 
Prize Condensation 

Thursday, July 3 i 

LITTLE DORRIT 

By Dickens 

Condensed by Charles E. L. 
Wingate 

Friday, July 4 

EAST LYNNE 

By Mrs. Henry Wood 

Prize Condensation 

• Saturday, July 5 

PEG WOFFINGTON 

By Charles Ueade 

Condensed by Edward Harold 
Crosby 

Sunday, July 6 

OLIVER TWIST 

By Dickens 

Prize Condensation 

Monday, July 7 * 

THE VIRGINIANS 

By Thackeray 

Condensed by Sara Ware Basset 

Tuesday, July 8 

THE LAST OF THE 
MOHICANS 

By Cooper 

Prize Condensation 

Wednesday, July 9 

WATERLOO 

By Erckmann-Chatrian 
Condensed by Charles E. L. 
Wingate 

Thursday, July 10 

THE WOMAN IN 
WHITE 

By Wilkie Collins 

Prize Condensation 

Friday, July 11 

UNCLE TOM’S CABIN 

By Harriet Beecher Stowe 

Condeimed by John Kendrick 
Bangs 

Saturday, July 12 

ALICE IN 
WONDERLAND 

By Lewis Curroll 

Condensed by Newton Newkirk 

Sunday, July 13 

SCARLET LETTER 

By Hawthorne 

Prize Condensation 

Monday, July 14 

MYSTERIES OF 
PARIS 

By Eugene Sue 

Condensed by Sara Ware Basset 

Tuesday, July 15 

ALL SORTS AND CON- 
DITIONS OF MEN 

By Sir Walter Besant 

Condensed by Charles 11. Lincoln 

Wednejsday, July 16 

ANNA KARENINA 

By Tolstoi 

Prize Condensation 

Thursday, July 17 

VIVIAN GREY 

By Lord Beacoiisfield 

Condensed by Alice G. Grozier 


Other Condensations, both by Specially Assigned Writers and by Prize-Winners in the $3000.00 Competition, will follow later. 

gCjgf* Don’t Forget to Have the Post Containing These Condensations Follow You on Your Vacation! 






THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1919 . 


Light Four 
Touring 

$1225 



Light Six 
Touring 
$1585 


Big Six Touring , $1985 

R. H. EVANS 


ABOVE PBICES'F.'O.'B.' DETROIT 


Brook Street, Newton 


Ne wton ville 

— Mr. and Mrs. C. Richardson and 
family are occupying their cottage at 

* Allerton, Mass. 

— West Newton Co-operative Hank. 
Start an account this month. 1 to 10 
shares at $1.00 each. Advt. 

— Miss Eleanor K. O’Connell gradu- 
ated this week from Roston University 
with the degree of A.B. 

— Mrs. Charles W. Davidson of Pres- 
cott street have returned from a visit 
to friends in Kentucky. 

. — Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Robinson 

of Watertown street are spending the 
summer at Allerton, Mass. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George N. Merritt of 
California street are being congratu- 
lated on the birth of a son. 

— Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Webber of Wat- 
ertown street have taken a house at 
. Egypt. Mass, for the summer. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Carl F. Schipper of 
Trowbridge avenue are spending the 
summer at Falmouth Heights. 

— Mrs. E. Donald Robb of Grove ave- 
nue and family are spending the sum- 
mer at Sagamore on the Cape. 

—Mr. and Mrs. E. H. King of Crafts 
.street have returned from a visit to 
Ashbury Park and Atlantic City. 

— Miss Sylvia B. Brigham graduated 
this week from the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College with the degree of 
B. S. 

— Major C. Raymond Cabot, has been 
, elected a member of the executive com- 
mittee of the Dartmouth Alumni Asso- 

• elation. 

— Among the graduates this week 
from Williams college was Mr. Hadwin 
H. Richardson of Highland avenue 
with the degree of A.B. 

— Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Webster, Jr., of 
Linwood avenue, Newtonville, have 
moved into their new home on Harri- 
son street, Newton Highlands. 

— Miss Hazel Bernice Glover, the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William E. 
Glover of Omar terrace, was married 
last Saturday at Philadelphia, to Mr. 
Harold W. Taylor, U. S. N. R. F., of 
Waltham. 

— Col. Brainerd Taylor, now sta- 
% tioned at Governor’s Island, N. Y., was 
’ in town last week in connection with 
the Commencement Day exercises at 
Harvard. He has lately received a 
citation from Gen. Pershing for meri- 
torious work in France and, what is 
ranch higher, the Decoration of an 
s Officer of the French Legion of Honor. 

There were only twenty-eight of these 
« latter given to the over 8000 Harvard 
■ men in the war, and not all of the 
twenty-eight were officers. 


i: J| 

iQLL 


:;n ike Stone 'Bottle 
yit the ^7 aunt 



Swetfs 

ORIGINAL 

ROOT BEER 

to tho dispenser — and soo how 
quickly your thirst will disappear. 
Cools, refreshes and Invl rorates. 
Drawn from the big stone bottle at 
the fount, you’re sure to find It. 

BEST FOR THIRST 

Made from pure herbs, barks and 
roots, according to tho old original 
Dr. Swett formula. A fuvorlte 
thirst quencher for moro than 60 
years. Most families buy It 
by the case — It’s so good at 
mealtime. Sold by the glass, 
A bottle and case, everywhere. 

IH Try It Today 

Your Dealer Has It I 


tad) 


G. P. Atkins 
398 Centro St. Newt. 
Cochrane & Stlmcts 
West Newton 


Newton Centre 

— Mr. W. W. Lovejoy is occupying 
the house, G2 Marshall street. 

— Mrs. Alvah Hovey has re-opened 
her house on Chestnut terrace. 

— Dr. John Chmiell is occupying the 
house, 550 Commonwealth avenue. 

— Mr. Young of Malden has taken 
the G. W. Brown house on Sumner 
street. 

— Miss Esther Preble graduated Wed- 
nesday from the Framingham Normal 
School. 

—Miss Bertha Roberts graduated 
from the Framingham Normal School 
last Wednesday. 

—Mr. and Mrs. F. F. Cutler of Ho- 
bart road are spending the summer at 
Hyannisport, Mass. 

— Mrs. Mary E. Cummings has sold 
her house on Oxford road to Lieut. 
Commander Harold Kellar. 

—Mr. C. W. Hubbard, Jr., Chestnut 
Hill, has sold his house on Old Eng- 
land road to Mr. D. M. Dodge. 

— Mr. Robert Proctor of Chestnut 
Hill graduated this week from Dart- 
mouth with the degree of A.B. magna 
cum laude. 

— Mr. W. H. Newcombe is moving 
to the Hammatt house, 15 Water 
street and Prof. Brightman will oc- 
cupy the house he has vacated on 
Braeland avenue. 

— The wedding of Mr. William H. 
Brackett and Miss Marjorie Connor 
of Boston, took place last Saturday* at 
the home of the groom on Applegarth 
street. Rev. E. T. Sullivan of Trinity 
Church performed the ceremony. 

— Last Saturday "The Hoodoo,” a 
farce, was presented for the benefit of 
the Newton Hospital at Bray Hall. 
The play was under the direction of 
Miss Marion Hubbard, and was a very 
great success. Those who took part 
were Mr. D. J. Moore, Mr. A. M. Dodge, 
Mr. Edgar N. Birdsall, Mr. Irving 
Plummer, Mr. Philip Wilder, Miss El- 
sie Pearson, Miss Gretchen Clifford, 
Miss Olive Lyons, Miss Dorothy Chase, 
Miss Ruth Bartlett, Miss Elizabeth 
Marden, and Miss Katherine Kimball. 
Elizabeth Chase, Ellen Chase, and Mc- 
Lean were the three children in the 
play. The play was full of surprises 
and kept the audience laughing most 
of the evening. Music was furnished 
by the Tech orchestra. 


NEW DAYAT HAND 

World Sees the Dawn of Univer- 
sal Demacracy. 


REAL ESTATE 


John T. Burns & Sons, Inc., of New- 
ton, Newtonville and Newton Centre, 
report that they have sold for Nor- 
man Marshall his splendid residential 
property situated at No. 107 Chestnut 
street, in the West Newton Hill sec- 
tion. This property is one of the well- 
known estates in this beautiful sub- 
urban section. It contains 14 rooms 
and 3 baths, together with a frame 
stable and garage and 47,000 square 
feet of land. The total assessment is 
$23,000 and the price paid was far in 
excess of the assessment. George E. 
Hoar purchases for a home. 

John T. Burns & Sons, Inc., also re- 
port that they have sold for the heirs 
of Daniel C. Heath the single brick 
and stucco residence situated at No. 
147 Highland avenue, also in the West 
Newton Hill section. The house which 
is strictly modern has 14 rooms and 4 
baths and together with 40,000 square 
feet of land is conveyed to Daniel E. 
Rust. Mr. Rust will occupy. The to- 
tal assessment on this property is 
$35,000. 

John T. Burns & Sons, Inc., have 
also sold for Daniel E. Rust his sin 
gle frame 8 room home, situated at 
No. 26 Kimball terrace, Newtonville. 
With the house there is a double gar- 
age and 5450 square feet of land. The 
total assessment is $5500. Sadie R. 
Melzard purchases for a home. 


PICNIC AT NOBUMBEGA 


The first annual outing of the em- 
ployees of the United Shoe Machin- 
ery Corporation was held Saturday at 
Norumbega Park. About 300 people 
attended. A section of the park was 
set aside for the party. There were 
baseball games between nines made 
up of men and women, and running, 
jumping and other sports. Tho mem- 
bers and guests attended the show in 
the open-air theatre and enjoyed a 
dinner. 


VV. C. RYAN. President I. A. LAN DESMAN, Manager 

MARION GEORGE NOWERS, Vice President 

R. L. GEORGE CO. 

F. L. GEORGE INC 

T . , ( 59 Hyde Park 

Telephones j no8 Hyde Rark 


Newton 

Hyde Park and 
Suburban 


Real Estate 


MORTGAGES 

INSURANCE ALL KINDS 

PROMPT SETTLEMENTS 

Hyde Park Office, Cleary Square 
Intown Office, 69 Kilby Street Telephone 4095 Main 


With the Downfall of the Turk and the 
Hun Santa Sophia Will Be 
Restored as a Chris- 
tian Temple. 

Among the happy rejoicings of 
theso victory dnys we are Inexpress- 
ibly glad that the war did not end 
until the unspeakable Turk was well 
started down the toboggan of defeat 
toward the bottomless pit, writes Dr. 
Charles Edward Locke. It Is a mighty 
triumph for demQcracy. With Jerusa- 
lem and Damascus In the bands of the 
Christians, and with Constantinople 
no longer desecrated as the capital of a 
filthy Mohammedanism, the foul Turk 
Is now getting his long-delnyed de- 
serts. Constantinople was named for 
a zealous Christian prince. It was 
made the imposing hendffunrters of the 
Greek church, and a beautiful temple 
was built in the yenr 537 by Justinian 
which is so stately and gorgeous that 
this proud builder on the dedication 
day exclaimed : "O Solomon, I have 
surpassed thee!” 

But in 1453 the city was captured 
by the sacrilegeous and infidel Sara- 
cen, and for 405 years it lias been 
the center of Moslem worship and 
propaganda. It Is beautifully situ- 
ated on the western slopes of the 
Bosporous, and looks out upon the 
picturesque Marmora. Justinian’s min- 
ister grand wns transformed Into 
a Moslem mosque. All the altars and 
crosses and frescoes and Insignia of 
Christianity were ruthlessly removed, 
and for nearly five centuries, instead 
of the worship of the most high God 
resounding beneath a wonderful dome 
which Michael Angelo said was like 
a part of the heavens brought down 
to earth, it has been the scene of Mo- 
hammedan mummeries and semi-pagan 
idolatry. , 

With the victories of this war,' no 
doubt magnificent Santa Sophia will 
be restored, and once again the 
praises of Christ will resound through 
sanctuary and cloister; and the mar- 
velous fresco of Jesus and his disci- 
ples In the high dome, which for cen- 
turies has been concealed behind the 
Incrustations of a detestable Moslem- 
ism, will once again utter its Inspir- 
ing and artistic messages to reverent 
Christian worshipers. The overthrow 
of the Turk is not only a triumph of 
democracy, but it is likewise a mighty 
victory for the truth and justice which 
are interpreted to the world by the gos- 
pel of the Son of God and the Son of 
Man, Jesus Christ of Nazareth. 

Until the savage Prussian Hun ap- 
peared the Turk had conferred upon 
him the ignominy of being the most 
brutal degenerate of all human 
history. A religion of lust, re-enforced 
by t lie bloody schniter, the Turk* cut 
his way through human bodies to an 
lgno!ile place of power in Europe and 
Asia and his murderous hate venting 
itself on the defenseless Christians, and 
especially, upon the Innocent Arme- 
nians. 

With the collapse of the Turkish 
government, “the Dardanelles will be- 
come if highway for the commerce of 
the free nations of the world, In place 
of a waterway held by pirates;” the 
Balkan terror conies to an end, and 
the Ignoble crescent fades out of sight 
before the Increasing effulgence of the 
blazing cross of the Christ of truth 
and freedom. 

The years have waited long for the 
tremendous historic events which are 
uow being enacted in bewildering suc- 
cession. It was only yesterday that 
there were four powerful autocracies 
that seemed so Intrenched in opulence 
and might that the centuries would 
not overthrow ; but today, Russia, and 
Austria, and Turkey, and Germany, 
have all fallen, and great has been 
the fall thereof; the twilight of the 
kings has deepened into night, and the 
dawn of universal democracy is al- 
ready reddening the eastern sky with 
premonitions of the new day of the 
people; and the harbingers of the 
morning are shouting on all hilltops 
and in all languages. “Proclaim lib- 
erty throughout all the land and to all 
the inhabitants thereof.” 


Old Bells Will Ring for Peace. 

The six old bells of Westminster 
abbey are being restored and augment- 
ed to take part in the celebrations that 
will follow the signing of peace. The 
old bells are of great historic inter- 
est. All except the treble were cast 
at tho old Whitechapel bell foundry — 
the tenor, weighing 1% tons, in 1738, 
the fifth In 1593, the fourth and sec- 
ond in 1743, and the third in 1583. 
The treble was cast probably at tho 
end of the thirteenth or the beginning 
of the fourteenth century, and miifet 
therefore huve rung out to eelebrnte 
the great victory over the Spanish 
armada in 1588. Whitechapel foun- 
dry. which has been working continu- 
ously since 1570, bus been intrusted 
with the restoration work uud the 
casting of the new bells. The connec- 
tion of the old firm with the abbey, 
after nearly 350 years, is thus being 
continued. 


Important Army Officer. 

The adjutant general of the United 
Sti les army is tin officer who keeps 
the records, orders and correspond- 
emu of the army, lie serves under 
the direction of the secretary of wnr 
and of the chief of staff. Through 
him and over his name Instructions 
und regulations of tho war depart- 
ment are sent forward to military offi- 
cer^ and troops. lie Is secretary and 
un lilvlst to the secretary of war. 


Newton Highlands 

— Miss Bertha Wlswcll has gone to 
Mngansett for the summer. 

— Miss Lucy Miller of Chicago is 
visiting Mrs. Hiram A. Miller. 

— Miss A. J. Trombie has Just re- 
turned from a trip to Cromwell, Conn. 

—Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Cady of Hill- 
side road left last Saturday for Me- 
gansett. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Edwin T. Cady of 
Hillside road went last Saturday to 
Megansett. 

— Miss Marion Griswold of Columbus 
road goes this Saturday to a camp near 
Fairlee, Vermont. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Ilawkes 
of Saxon road will spend the summer 
at Franklin, N. H. 

— Mrs. G. H. Fiske of Woodbine 
street has gone to Ashbury Grove, 
Mass., for the summer. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William H. Timble 
of Clark street are being congratulated 
on the birth of a son. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Edward Legge of 
Central terrace are spending the sum- 
mer at Marblehead Neck. 

— Mr. and Mrs. J. Howard Thompson 
of Lakewood road have gone to Deer 
Island, Maine, for the summer. 

— Lieut. Judd Farley and Mrs. Far- 
ley, who have been in France during 
the last two years arrived yesterday. 

— Mr. William E. Herron of Inver- 
ness, Florida, is visiting his mother, 
Mrs. Mary E. Herron of Lexington 
street. 

— Rev. Louis Parsons and family 
have gone to Nantucket for the sum- 
mer. Mr. Parsons returns for services 
during July. 

— Mr. Charles Miller of Des Moines, 
Iowa, has been visiting Mrs. Hiram 
Allen Miller, who has been attending 
his reunion at Yale. 

— Miss Alice and Miss Esther Clem- 
ent are going to Camp Yokum at Beck- 
et in the Berkshires for the summer. 
Miss Barbara Simpson will go with 
tliem. 

— Mrs. H. H. Longfellow of Grove 
street is to have charge of the Junior 
Camp of the Sargent School at Peter- 
boro, N. H. Miss Nathalie and Miss 
Margaret Longfellow are to be in the 
senior camp. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wales of Au- 
burn street were the recipients of 
many congratulations by their friends 
and neighbors on the occasion of their 
10th wedding anniversary which oc- 
curred Wednesday evening. About 75 
were present. 

— The closing entertainment of the 
Junior Christian Endeavor Society of 
the Congregational Church was held 
•Thursday evening. Two short plays 
were given. The first, "Human Owls,” 
told of a boy who had thought it would 
be fun to be up all night, but was 
brought to a realization of what this 
meant by a dream in which the toilers 
of the night showed him what they did 
during the night that he might be well 
and comfortable. The second play, 
"Alice through a Postal Card." was the 
story of a little girl who visited Japan 
in a dream and came to be much inter- 
ested in that far-away country. The 
part of the little hoy in the first play 
was played by Richard Walter, and of 
the little girl in the second play by 
Elizabeth Miller. 


SPRING— CRANE 


On last Saturday at St. Mary’s 
Episcopal Church at Newton Lower 
Falls, Mrs. Edna Sharpe Crane was 
married to Mr. Chester H. Spring, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Spring of 
Newton Lower Falls. Rev. Ransom 
Church performed the ceremony. The 
bride was given away by her brother, 
Mr. Robert M. Sharp of Bridgewater, 
Vt., and was attended by her niece, 
Miss Aileen Wright. The best man 
was Dr. Louis I. Moulton of Concord, 
N. H. The ushers were Mr. John R. 
Clark and Mr. Chester E. Dodge, cous- 
ins of the bride. 

After the ceremony a reception was 
held at the new home of the bridal 
couple, 5 Orchard street, Newton Low- 
er Falls. 


DEATH OF MRS. KILBON 


Mrs. Amelia J. Kilbon, widow of 
John L. Kilbon, died Friday at her 
home, 450 Centre street. Mrs. Kilbon 
who had been a resident here for the 
past seven months, had been in fail- 
ing health for some time. She was 82 
years of age. 

She is survived by her son, Rev. J. 
L. Kilbon of Franklin street. 

Funeral se r vices were held at l^ee, 
Mrs. Kilbon’s former home. Monday. 
The Rev. Charles M. Colderwood of 
the Congregational Church of that 
town officiated and the burial was in 
the town cemetery. 



Our Wonderful Ventilating Syatem 
mokes this tlu-ntre the cooleet In 
Greater Huston. 


MON., TUBS., WED. 

ANITA 

STEWART 

In Her 3rd Million Dollur 
Production 
“MARY REGAN” 


MARSHALL 

MONTGOMERY 

World Premier Ventriloquist 
And Four Other Big Acts 
V A U D E V I L L E 

Till* HS., PHI., SAT. 

BRYANT WASHBURN 
in “Putting It Cher” 

All New Vuudeville 

IIIU SUNDAY CONCEUT 
Fit EE AUTO PAHKINO 


Dally at *4 and 7. SO. Sat. t'outtuuou* 
I.SO to 10.S0. Tel. i'auili. A00. Seals 
Deserved Olio Week lu Advauce, Ki- 
wi»t Hut. Spec. Mat. I’riuce, lie A 17u 


BRED GREAT MEN 


Italian City of Florence May 
Claim High Honor. 


Birthplace of Many of Those Who 

Rank, in Intellectual Ability and 
Achievement, Far Above the 
Rett of Mankind. 

At first thought one would be apt 
to claim for London, the great metrop- 
olis, the honor of having given birth 
to the greatest number of the world’* 
geniuses. 

Among other great Londoners the 
following might be cited: Francis Ba- 
con, philosopher and essayist; Spen- 
ser, Jonson, Milton and Keats, world- 
known and honored poets; Hogarth, 
Turner, Watts, Millais and Holman 
Hunt, artists whose achievements are 
ucclalmed by all the world of taste; 
P'ox. Pitt and Beaconsfleid, statesmen 
who have influenced the building of 
empire; Daniel Defoe, the novelist; 
Faraday and Iluxley, the scientists, 
and many others. All these would 
stand in the very front ranks of great- 
ness, some of them, like Milton and 
Bacon, towering above their fellow 
men like mountain peaks among mole- 
hills. 

The Frenchman would undoubtedly 
stand up for the claims of Paris, quot- 
ing a long list of poets and painters 
and novelists and statesmen to Justify 
his boast. 

The Italian would probably put the 
question: "How far back may we go 
in this quest? For I ^ancient Rome is 
to he added to the record of the more 
modern city, wherp will you find her 
equal?” 

Then Athens would lift up her clas- 
sic voice in protest, and quote a long 
list of her sons who have formed the 
models of all subsequent time in nrt 
and poetry and philosophy and archi- 
tecture. 

But there Is another competitor 
which can beat them all in this com- 
bat. Compared with London or Paris, 
or even Rome, it is a small place. 

The city is Firenze — Florence — the 
native city of Savonarola, of Fra An- 
gelico. of Donatello, of Botticelli, of 
Leonardo da Vinci, of the mighty Mi- 
chael Angelo, the glory of his age and 
of all succeeding ages; Florence, the 
city of Boccaccio, the father of novel- 
ists ; of Machlavelll, whose very name 
is a proverb, and of the famous Me- 
dici ; yes, nnd lastly, Florence the city 
of Dante, the first both in time and 
position of this glorious galaxy of 
stars of the first magnitude. 

How such a small place ever gave 
birth to so muny mighty sons of 
genius is one of the standing puzzles 
of heredity and environment and edu- 
cation. Why does not Glasgow breed 
geniuses? Nobody knows. During n 
period of two hundred years Florence 
was a forcing bed for supreme achieve- 
ment. During that time the little city 
broke all records, ancient and mod- 
ern, and it Is hard to see where her 
competitor is to spring from who shall 
take away her crown of laurels. 


Some War Economies. 

There is probably nothing that 
seems so useless In the eyes of the 
average person ng an Irish potato 
which has begun to rot, but the de- 
partment of agriculture In its war-time 
experiments hns discovered that starch 
can be made from a decayed potato 
just as well, if not better, than from 
a good one, and so the surplus stock 
of the farmer or dealer need no longer 
be thrown away or wasted. 

In like fashion chemists seeking 
methods to avoid world-wide food 
shortages have found that sugar can- 
not only he made from beets, hut 
from sweet potatoes as well. The 
farmer himself can make good sirup 
from his sweet potatoes by boiling* 
them until they can he mashed in the 
water to thick, mushy liquid. To this 
ground malt Is added and the result, 
after properly cooking for ubout an 
hour, is a thick sirup, which is strained 
through a cloth nnd used for any sort 
of sweetening. 


Modest Hero. 

My heroic action wns this: We were 
lying close up to their defenses, and 
for four days had not been able to 
climb out; we lay like reptiles. There 
was not a dry spot ; one could not get 
accustomed to it. And H — , the en- 
sign. had been caught ou the wire when 
we had started to .attack. At first he 
asked for help, called on the men by 
name; hut one could not show one’s 
nose without being shot. Then he only 
groaned nnd breathed heavily. That 
went on for four days, and he still 
lived. It Is a sin to grumble at God, 
but here one says: “Why be careful 
of one’s soul?” I couldn’t eudure It 
ami took him off the wire; but I got 
wounded. Then these wns nq attack, 
and our men captured the post. — Lon- 
don Times. 


Fire-Retarding Paints. 

From tests made at the federal bu 
reau of standards It appears that, 
while practically ull piilnt coutings 
have some fire-retarding action, none 
of those so far tested afford very grout 
protection. All the samples in questlou 
were materially damaged by applica- 
tion of tin me for u few seeouds. Both 
sodium silicate anil whitewash rank 
comparatively high. These have the 
advantage of cheapness uud eau both 
be used on the same surface. However, 
according to a recent bulletin of the bu- 
reau, no treatment of wood after erec- 
tlou can be expected to serve as an ef- 
fective fire protection, und the use of 
such materials should uot be made uu 
excuse for omitting uny of the usual 
precautions against tire. 



8 

a 



Deposits Draw interest 
From July 10th 


West Newton 

— Mr. Fred D. Wellington has sold 
his house on Davis avenue to Mr. F. 
E. Waring. 

— Dr. Fred M. Lowe attended, on 
Monday, the 40th reunion of his class 
at Phillips Exeter Academy. 

— Mr. Frank J. Chaplin of Newton 
Highlands has moved into the Kil- 
burn house on Waltham street. 

- In the women’s national .tennis 
tourney last week at Philadelphia, 
Miss Marion Zinderstein was the run- 
ner up in the singles and with Miss 
Eleanor Goss, won the doubles. 


PLYMOUTH THEATRE — In re- 
sponse to the public demand for more 
of “The Firefly” this charming musical 
comedy will be presented again by Carl 
Hunt’s company of musica4 artists at 
the Plymouth Theatre, the week of 
June 30th. Following the first per- 
formance last week the Boston critics 
were unanimous in their praise of the 
excellence of this capable aggregation 
of young and winsome players in the 
show which made Emma Trentlni fam- 
ous. No more charming ditties than 
those with which Rudolph Friml 
graced this dainty comedy have ever 
been heard on the American light 
opera stage: and the book by Otto 
Hauerbach is not only a pretty story 
but one crammed full of humor and 
amusing situations. “The Firefly” has 
been elaborately staged and costumed, 
and is a production which every music 
lover, every devotee of light opera at 
its best, every theatre goer to whom 
the superlative appeals will want to 
see. 



$450 for Fireproof Garage 

CONCRETE BLOCK or stucco, will 
build in Boston or suburbs, fit any car; 
only a few at this price. W. F. FLYNN. 
19 Lothian road. Brighton 1964-M. 


MORTGAGEE'S SALE 


By virtue of the power of sale con- 
tained in a certain mortgage given by 
Harriet H. Waterman to Florence 
Piper dated September 20, 1917 and 
recorded with Middlesex South Dis- 
trict Deeds in Book 4161. Page 535 
and for breach of the conditions there- 
in contained and for the purpose of 
foreclosing the same will be sold at 
public auction ou the premises here- 
inafter described on Tuesday, the 
twenty-second day of July, 1919 at 
ten-thirty o’clock in the forenoon, all 
and singular the premises which are 
described in said mortgage substan- 
tially as follows: — 

"A certaiii parcel of laud situate in 
Newton, in the County of Middlesex, 
in said Commonwealth, hounded and 
described as follows: — Southwesterly 
on Fairmont Avenue, eighty-six and 
12-100 (86.12) feet: Northwesterly on 
my other land, one hundred forty 
(140) feet; Northeasterly on my 
other land, sixty-three and 6S-100 
(63. 6S) feet; and Southeasterly on 
other land belonging to me. one hun- 
dred thirty-eight and 17-100 (13S.17) 
feet; be any of said measurements 
more or less or however otherwise the 
said premises may be bounded, meas- 
ured or described. 

The Westerly corner of the above 
described premises is one hundred 
fourteen and 29-100 (114.29) feet 

Southeasterly from the junction of 
Claremont Street aud Fairmont Ave- 
nue. 

The above described premises are 
a portion of the same which were con- 
veyed to me by Sarah F. ivy by her 
deed dated March S. 1917 and record- 
ed with Middlesex So. Dist. Deeds in 
Hook 4120, Puge 561.” 

The premises will be sold subject 
to all unpaid taxes, sewer assessments 
and municipal liens if any there are. 

The terms will be announced at the 
time and place of sale. 

FLORENCE PIPER. Mortgagee. 

52 Walker St.. 

Koslindale. Mass. 

June 27-July 4-11. 


WOODLAND 

PARK 

A Boarding School for Girls and 
a Country Day School for Girls, 
and for Boys under ten. 

The Junior Department of Lasell 
Seminary 

Located in attractive and com- 
fortable building formerly known 
as the Woodland Park Hotel. 
Kindergarten, Primary and 
Grammar Grades 
Conversational French, Music 
with supervised practice. Drawing, 
Sewing, Folk and Social Dancing 
and Deportment, Swimming and 
Riding; Individual attention. An 
abundance of good wholesome 
food, fresh air, exercise and sleep. 
Visitors Always Welcome 
Come and see the school and 
talk over the problem. For cata- 
log address 

GUY M. WINSLOW, 
Auburndale, Mass. 

Phone 

Newton West 630 


CEO. W. MILLS 

Under-taker 

Anywhere at Any Time 
Mortuary Chapel at Serrlee of ] 

811 AMI 818 WASHINGTON 1 

wwioi mu 


LostSavingsBankBooks 

Savings Bank ooolu as luted heiow 
are lost ana application baa Deen made 
tor payments of the accounts in accord- 
ance with Sec. 40. Chap. 580. of the Aota 
of 1901 and amendments. 

Newton Centre Savings Bunk Book, 
No. 9164. 


Notice is hereby given? that the sub- 
scriuer has oeeu duly appointed ad- 
ministrator of the estate of Horace 
E. Woodberry late of Newton in the 
County of Middlesex, deceased, intes- 
tate, and has taken upon himself that 
trust by giving bond, as the law di- 
rects. All persons having demands 
upon the estate of said deceased are 
required to exhibit the same; and all 
persons indebted to said estate are 
called upon to make payment to 
DWIGHT L. WOODBERRY, Adm. 
(Address) 

8 Highland St., 

West Newton, Mass. 

25 June, 1919. 

June 27-July 4-11. 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin, cred- 
itors, aud all other persons inter- 
ested in the estate of Albert J. 
Mohor late of Newton in said 
County, deceased, intestate. 
WHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration ou the estate of said 
deceased to Marius L. Mohor of New- 
ton in said County, or to some other 
suitable person. 

You are hereby cited to appear at 
a Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge in said County of Middlesex, on 
the sixteenth day of July A. D. 1919, 
at nine o’clock in the forenoon, to 
show cause, if any you have, why the 
same should uot be granted. 

And the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishiug this citation once in ouch 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a uewspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the last publication 
to be one day at least before said 
Court, aud by mailing post paid a copy 
of this citation to the uext of kin of 
said deceased seven days at least be- 
fore said Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclutlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of suid Court, this 
twenty-fourth day of Juue in the year 
one thousand nine hundred uud nine- 
teen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
June 27-July 4-11. 


Advertise in the Graphic 



THE NEWTON GltAPIIH, FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1D1D. 


The reliance that woincnklnd haai sugar-lllled wafers which they su> 


•or ted. 

There was no question about the 
omplctc success of Nettle’s discov- 
ery. a s thq fragrance of the fresh 
~~~ which she served added 
o the InviTing repast. 

Another favorite at the ten hour — 
(md one sees them almost as much 
Icon — is the 
?r. It seems 
ndispensahle in modern housekeep- 
ng. P6ople have l>een so thoroughly 
* about the thousands of 
graham Hour that 
jilue is a tunt- 


learned to put in eraekers Is beitfl 
well Illustrated at the teas help 
given for ret timing soldiers anc 
sailors. 

Every woman in tlv 
has in her pantry a generous sup) 
ply of the National Biscuit Cotni 
pany’s always useful and univerj 

sally accept 

Nettie, a ^comely young womai 
yeomau of the Navy, s ill in uni 
form, found herself unexpectedly 
entertaining a company jv 
uptown home the ' 

Including sov ucdt& p^ A . - 

a batties hig ^ 1 ^ A National 

'eve£vJSr^ Biscuit Company product, 
nationally recognized as a health 
food and nationally liked. N. B. C. 

Graham Crackers — fresh and whole 
some wherever you find them. 

NATIONAL BISCUIT 
COMPANY 

lous 
served/ i 
now the 

again, and til ^ 
vealed, in a silve 
On a thick bod of pinkH 
edged with sassafras To: | 
mona and Lotus biscuit wcif 
Some bruised leaves lay ; 
torn of the basket and tf? 
emitted a delicr.to fragrance. ^ 

charm to the delightfully flavored?^ 


‘termine 
busl- 
tfvou- 
Jho 

tn 



bar- 
man 

Snce recently, 
It very difficult 
Vend that was either 
ffr digestible. He had re- 
Ho N. B. C. Graham Crackers. 


REAL ESTATE 


Edmands & Byfleld report the sale 
of the property 281 Park street. New- 
ton, for D. M. Stewart to Clinton L. 
Scovell of Newton, who purchases for 
a home. Property consists of large 
dwelling, stable and an acre of land, 
all valued at $17,000. 


nrrrnriinro for quality of work see 

ntrtH tNOtO FRANK A. LOCKE, the tuner. 


Removal Notice 

Merchant's Co-oporative Bank 

of Boston 

Will Occupy New Quarters at 

51 Cornhill 

AFTER JULY 1ST 
Owing to Increase of Business 


COPLEY THEATRE— “Two Pairs.” 
the new farce which the Henry Jewett 
Players acted last Monday has proved 
so mirth-provoking that it will he con- 
tinued for a second week at the Copley 
Theatre. It is the work of Donald 
MacLaren, an English actor who has 
appeared on the American stage as 
well as in the playhouses of his own 
country. His plot, as his title suggests, 
centres upon two men and two women, 
Both couples are young, the men being 
master and valet, and the women are 
mistress and maid. At the beginning 
of the play they are all unknown to 
one another, although there is an un- 
derstanding between their fathers that 
Vincent Stilling and Sylvia Esmond 
are some day to be married. 


HERMANN SULZEN 

VIOLIN TEACHER AND SOLOIST 
Terms, 92.00 per Lennon 
Available for Social Affr.lrp 
I NONANTUM STREET NEWTON 

Tel. Newton North 757-R 


EDITH A. CUSHING 

CUSTOM CORSETS TO ORDER 

Altered or Repaired 
110 TREMONT ST., BOSTON 
Telephone Fort Hill 2149 


Tel’a Back Bay 53628, 75877 
Hours 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. Dally 
Saturday 9 A. M. to 1 P. 1L 

Boston Employment Agency 

Licensed 

Established 29 Tears 
MRS. H. G. PRESTON, Manager 

SUPERIOR HOUSEHOLD. HOTEL and 
INSTITUTION HEI.l* OF AI.L KINDS 
•74 BOYLSTON STREET. BOSTON, MASS. 


a. a Bulbullan Tel. Beach 734 

Oriental Rug Works 

Cl eanin g. Stretching and Repairing ef 
All Kinds 

Rni* and Needle Art Works 
by Armenian Experts 
1M BOYLSTON ST.. BOSTON, MASS. 
Room 725 

Residence, Auburndale— Tel. Con. 



WHEEL CHAIRS 


The Largest Selection in New England 

SICK ROOM REQUISITES 

of Every Description 

F. H. THOMAS CO. 

689-691 Boylston Street, Boston 
Tel. Back Bay 1196 


YERI-BRITE 

The Polish Everybody Is Using 
Once Used Always Used 
Trial Bottle 35c 

Your Nearest Dealer 
or 

THE LINWOOD CO. 

16 Corahlll, Boston 


WANTED 

All kinds of Ladies’ and Gentlemen's 
cast-off clothing, furs, Jewelry, books, 


etc. 


MRS. MONAHAN 
273 Tremont Street, Boston 
Telephone Beach 5742 


FLAG POLE 

Derrick, Spar, Tent, Pike and 
Bean Poles, Cellar Posts. 

Also Spruee and Oregon Spars, 
all lengths 

BOSTON FLAG POLE CO. 

169 Broudway Extension 
South Boston TeL So. Boston 112 


Telephone, Beach 7573 W. G. Weeber, Mgr. 

LINCOLN CARE COMPANY 

HOUSE CLEANING 

Cleaning, Painting, Kalsomining, Window Washing, 
Renovation of Rugs and Carpets 
In fact all work incidental to proper care of any estate 
119 LINCOLN STREET, - - - BOSTON, MASS. 


X 



OFFEE 


For your own gratification 
and lor the pleasure of your guests—-* 1 
serve WHITE HOUSE COFFEE. 

The unbroken label on the can is 
your guarantee of coffee 
perfection. 

DWlNELL-WRIGnT CO. 




Principal Cuff** IUxiiUrt 
I BOSTON - CHICAGO 


DOMESTIC SCIENCE 


Miss Marian Keep, Editor 
REFRESHING DRINKS 


How many mothers would rather 
have their children enjoy the shade 
from the trees In their own yard than 
to use up their strength and energy 
running to the drug store to Invest 
their Inst six cents in some prepared 
drink. Have you ever thought of the 
expense, how much it menus when the 
youngsters spend most of their weekly 
allowance for flavored water and that 
is about all it amounts to. 

Would you think of only rinsing 
your glasses in cold water after using 
them at each meal, and yet that is the 
stnte of affairs at the fountain, and 
you are perfectly willing your chil- 
dren should patronize the druggist. 

Certainly warm werrther is condu- 
cive to auto trips and how warm and 
thirsty one is after riding in the heat. 
Is it the drug store that one seeks? 
Why not fill your thermos bottle with 
a cool drink prepared with your own 
materials at home. 

Here are some suggestions which 
will not only satisfy the thirst of the 
grown ups on their outing, but will 
also please the children when they ask 
for an afternoon tea pnrty. 


Afternoon Beverage 

1 quart cold water. 

4 tsp. Orange syrup. 

1-4 c loganberry juice. 

juice of three lemons. 

Mix orange syrup with water, add 
juice of lemons and loganberry juice, 
dilute with ice water. Note — The or- 
ange syrup makes the beverage plenty 
sweet. 


Fruit Punch 

I quart cold water. 

1 cup sugar. 

1 cup pineapple (shredded). 

1-2 c lemon juice. 

2 tsp orange syrup. 

1 c raspberry juice. 

Make a syrup with sugar and water 
and pineapple, and boil for five min- 
utes; add fruit juice, and orange syr- 
up. if desired, cool, strain and dilute 
with ice water. 


Iced Tea 


8 tsp. tea. 

1 quart boiling water. 

2 tbsp. lemon juice. 

4 spearmint leaves. 

Put tea into a tea pot and pour 
boiling water over it, add the mint, 
and let stand on the back of the stove 
to steep for five minutes. It should 
never be boiled. Strain the tea, let 
cool, serve with cracked ice and lem- 
on. 


Club Punch 


6 lemons. 

10 oranges. 

1 c grated pineapple. 

1 c raspberry syrup. 

1 1-2 c tea infusion. 

1 1-4 c sugar. 

1 c hot water. 

1 quart ginger ale. 

Mix juice of orange and lemons with 
pineapple, raspberry syrup and tea; 
then add a syrup made by boiling su- 
gar and water together. Turn in 
punch bowl over a large piece of ice. 
Chill thoroughly, and just before serv- 
ing add ginger ale. 


GIVEN THE D. S. CROSS 


Mr. Joseph .1. Boughan of Water- 
town street, Nonantum, private in 
Company C, 101st Infantry, was given 
the Distinguished Service Cross on 
Tuesday afternoon, the presentation 
taking place on Boston Common, and 
being made by Major-General Clar- 
ence R. Edwards. 

Mr. Boughan was cited for extra- 
ordinary heroism in action north of 
Verdun. Oct. 27. 1918. mile advanc- 
ing with the first wave Private Bou- 
ghan with another soldier, attacked 
a machine-gun nest and killed two 
of the crew after a hand-to-hand en- 
counter in which he was severely 
wounded. 

MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF 1 

REAL ESTATE 


Under and by virtue of the power 
of sale contained in a certain mort- 
gage of real estate given by Charles 
A. Dooley of Boston, Suffolk County, 
Massachusetts to David A. Yuill of 
Somerville, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts, dated March 14, 1917, and re- 
corded with Middlesex South District 
Deeds, Book 4122, Page 301, for breach 
of the condition of said mortgage and 
for the purpose of foreclosing the 
same, will be sold at public auction 
on the premises on Monday, July 14, 
1919, at 2:30 O’clock in the afternoon, 
the real estate described in said mort- 
gage, to wit: 

"The land with the buildings there- 
on. situated in that part of Newton, 
Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 
called Newton Centre and shown as 
Lot No. 50 on a “Plan of Brentwood 
Park in Newton Centre," E. S. Smilie, 
Surveyor, dated July 1897, and duly 
recorded with Middlesex South Dis- 
trict Deeds, and hounded and de- 
scribed as follows: — . 

Easterly by Pleasant Street, eighty 
(80) feet; 

Northerly by Lot No. 51 on said 
plan, one hundred and ten (110) feet; 

Westerly in part by Lot No. 45 and 
In part by Ixjt No. 4G on said plan, 
ninety (90) feet; 

Southerly in part by Lot No. 48 and 
in part by Lot No. 49 on said plan, one 
hundred and seventeen (117) feet. 

Containing nine thousand three 
hundred and twenty (9,320) square 
feet of land. 

Subject to restrictions so far us now 
in force and applicable as set forth in 
deed given to said Charles A. Dooley 
by tlie Huh Real Estate Corporation.” 

Said premises will be sold subject 
to all unpaid taxes, tax titles, muni- 
cipal liens ami assessments, if any. 
Three hundred dollars ($300) required 
at sule. 

COLUMBIA TRUST COMPANY, 
Assignee. 

For further particulars upply to 
Swain, Carpenter Ai Nay, Attorneys 
for the Assignee, Rooms 1111-1117 
Paddock Building, 101 Tremont Street, 
Boston, Muss. 

June 20-27-July 4. 


NO 1ESFI MONTH 

Time of Birth Has Little to Do 
With Genius. 


Statistics Show That Nature Practical- 
ly Plays No Favorites In Her 
Production of the Gifted 
Ones of the Earth. 

Astrologers believe that the planets 
"reigning” at the time of birth gov- 
ern us throughout life, and that, from 
a literary point of view certain months 
are more favorable than others In 
which to be born. 

Taking the hundred best British 
writers since the day of Chaucer, no 
loss than forty-eight were born In the 
four months February, May, August 
and November. 

In February were born Charles Dick- 
ons, Pepys the diarist, and Thomas 
Moore, while of more modern date 
and fame are George Meredith, Israel 
Zangwill, Anthony Hope, Harrison 
Ainsworth and Wilkie Collins. 

Pope and Addison were both horn 
In May, as also were Browning, Ross- 
etti, Moore, Bulwer Lytton, Thomas 
Hood, Jerome K. Jerome, and Sir 
James M. Barrie. 

August seems to be the blrthmonth 
of poets, for in that month were born 
Dryden, Herrick, Scott, Shelley, South- 
ey and Tennyson. 

Apparently November is an unlucky 
month for literary people, for among 
those who were born In November are 
Thomas Chatterton, who, in disappoint- 
ment and poverty, committed suicide 
at eighteen ; William Cowper, who suf- 
fered from melancholin and suicidal 
mania, and finally died insane; Oliver 
Goldsmith, continually In prison for 
debt ; John Bunynn, who spent 12 
years In prison, thereby giving us "Pil- 
grim’s Progress;” Swift, subject to fits 
of passion and ill-humor, died insane; 
Robert Louis Stevenson suffered from 
almost continuul ill-health, and died 
at forty-four. 

So much for the “favored months." 
Of the others, January saw the birth 
of Bobble Burns, Byron and Lewis 
Carrol, quthor of “Alice in Wonder- 
land," who was also a famous mathe- 
matician. 

March was the blrthmonth of Smol- 
lett and Steele, os also of Elizabeth 
Barrett Browning. 

In April was horn the greatest 
genius the English language has 
known, William Shakespeare, while 
among others born in this month were 
Wordsworth, Keble, Heber, Swinburne 
and Herbert. Charlotte Bronte and 
Anthony Trollope were also born In 
this month. 

June Is not a very good month, 
Charles Rende and Charles Kingsley 
being the only two writers. 

July gave us Thnckeray and George 
BerTinrd Shaw, and those Interested 
in astrology may find a resemblance 
between the two satirists. 

September and October were both 
poor months, Mrs. Hemans and II. G. 
Wells being born in September and 
Coleridge, Keats and Sheridan In Oc- 
tober. 

Finally Milton, Grny and Matthew 
Arnold were born in December, as 
were nlso Jane Austin and Carlyle. 

So there is hope for most people as 
far as birthmonths are concerned. 


Demonstration Home Garden 


It Is now time for the home garden- 
er to think about the crops he will 
plant to succeed his early spring plant- 
ings. Spinach, radishes and lettuce 
have "gone by" In most gardens and 
early peas will soon be harvested and 
pulled up. Tlie question naturally aris- 
es in the minds of ninny gnrdeners — 
“What shall I plant now?" 

Shell beans may be planted up to 
July 1st and string beans up to July 
10th. Beets and carrots for winter 
use may be sown as Into a‘s the middle 
of July and very satisfactory results 
obtnined. Cos lettuce is an excellent 
variety to plnnt during the summer 
months as it withstands the heat better 
than the other varieties. Kohl-Rnbi is an 
excellent vegetable that grows quickly. 
It should not be planted later than 
the second week In July. Cauliflower 
plants may now be set out although 
gardeners as a rule find them some- 
what difficult to raise. 

See to it that your root crops are 
thinned before they commence to 
crowd. Thin beets to 2 inches apart in 
the row and when the young beets 
begin to crowd, thin again. Let your 
beets gcow 6 Inches or more In height 
before thinning as they make the best 
greens nt this stage. The following 
distances arg about right to leave be- 
tween vegetables when thinning — car- 
rots 2 1-2 — 3 inches, parsnips 4 inches, 
beans 2 inches, corn in drill 6 inches, 
chard 6 inches, New Zealand spinach. 
12 inches and pole beans, squash and 
cucumbers 4 to 6 plants to the hill. 

If your vegetables are growing slow- 
ly spread a pinch of sodium nitrate 
around the plants and hoe it into the 
soil. Another way to apply this plant 
stimulant is to dissolve a teaspoonful 
of it in a quart of water and sprinkle 
the soil around the plants with it tak- 
ing care not to touch the foliage with 
the nitrate. Sodium nitrate produces 
fine results on all plants grown for 
their leaves. 

If you wish to raise some good early 
tomatoes work into the soil around the 
plant a small handful of acid phos- 
phate. Then make three or four appli- 
cations about 10 days apart of sodium 
nitrate to the plants. 

Tomato plants should be trained to 
two stems and tied uo to £ stake. This 
method of training keeps the vines up 
off the ground and allows the sunlight 
to reach every part of the plant. This 
induces earliness in the crop, produces 
better fruit and lessens the blossom 
and rot trouble. All lateral branches 
should he nipped off. These grow from 
the junction of the main stem and a 
leaf. The fruit stems grow out from 
the main stem itself so there should be 
no trouble in distinguishing them 
from lateral branches. 

Many gardeners have the idea that 
a garden should be watered every day 
during a dry spell. This is a had prac- 
tice as it tends to draw the plants roots 
toward the surface. The garden drys 
out quickly the next day and a crust 
forms on the surface which produces a 
condition for a rapid evaporation of 
moisture from the soil. Frequent cul- 
tivation of the garden does more good 
than several wrterings. This is es- 
pecially true in hot dry weather. If 
your garden needs water, soak it thor- 
oughly in the evening and next day 
givtf it ag ood cultivation so it will hold 
the moisture. A garden should be cul- 
tivated after every heavy rain. 


Reproducing the Talmud. 

One of the circumstances due to 
the war is that it has been found nec- 
essary to reproduce the plates for 
printing the Hebrew Talmud, orig- 
inally produced In the town of Wii- 
na, Russia. When *thls city was cap- 
tured by Germany the electrotypes of 
tlie Talmud, it is reported, were used 
for ammunition. To reset the work 
In Hebrew would take years with an 
ordinary outfit. 

It was found necessary that the 
plates should be made by photo-engrav- 
ing. and this work Is notv being done 
in Montreal under the auspices of the 
Union of Orthodox Rabbis of the Unit- 
ed States and Canada. 

The Talmud contains 9,000 pages, 8 
by 14, and It Is divided Into IS volumes. 
The first volume Is finished, and the 
second Is in print now. It is estimated 
that it will take about two years be- 
fore the work Is completed. 


Army Animals Bought Abroad. 

Not all of the animals used by the 
United States expeditionary forces In 
overseas service were taken from this 
country. More than twice as many 
were bought abroad. The totnl num- 
ber of animals purchased overseas to 
January 11, 1919. Is 152,330. Pur- 
chases of horses In France amounted 
to 109.848; In Spain. 1.531; and In 
Great Britain, 11,898. The value of 
purchases In France was $43,122,094; 
in Spain, $5S9,160; and Great Britain, 
$5,314,711, or a total value of $49.- 
025.005 for 123,277 horses purchased 
overseas. The total number of mules 
purchased overseas amounted to 20,- 
059, with a value of $11,115,847. There 
were 9.341 mules, valued at $2,895,928, 
purchased In France; 12.941 11114I0S, 

with a value of $5,019,150. purchased 
in Spain; and 0.777 mules, valued at 
$2,000,703, purchased In Great Britain. 


Special Naval Uniforms. 

Uniforms having distinctive insignln 
have been designed by tlie shipping 
hoard for tin* young apprentices now 
In training at tlie various school ships. 
An embroidered anchor under the na- 
tional shield, worked Into the cloth 
of the blouse pocket, and two broad 
white stripes ou collar and cuff, In- 
stead of three narrow ones, as worn by 
the navy, will constitute the Insignia 
by which one may discriminate be- 
tween the men of the merchant ma- 
rine and resembling those worn by 
the regular men of the navy. 


CLOSING EXERCISES 


The Pianoforte and Theory Stu- 
dents’ Association held its closing ex- 
ercises Friday night at the home of 
Mrs. W. O. Harrington, 53 Court street, 
Newtonville. 

The excellent program given by a 
few of the students was thoroughly 
enjoyed by a large audience who 
showed its appreciation in enthusias- 
tic applause. 

The pupils all did so well it was 
difficult to select the ones who played 
the best. Miss Katherine Auryansen’s 
rendition of Liszt’s Hungarian Rhap- 
sody No. 2 called forth well merited 
applause. Marion Maxim, Esther 
Stiles, Campbell Delesdernier, Elsa 
Haase, Miss Eleanor Martin, and Miss 
Jennette Martin also deserve special 
mention. 

At the close of the program Miss 
Helen Douglas, principal, presented 
the first prize to Miss Jennette Mar- 
tin for having the highest average for 
the year, and the second prize to 
Thelma Coombs. Esther Stiles, El- 
eanor Mildram, Barbara Tracy and 
Ethel Saunders received honorable 
mention. 

The following took part in the pro- 
gram: Katherine Barry, Miss Gertrude 
Barry, John Douglas. Esther H. Stiles, 
Alice James, Paul James, Phyllis Har- 
rington, Willard Brown, Ruth Hol- 
brook. Eleanor Mildram, Patty Wright, 
Campbell Delesdernier, Sally Wright. 
Donald Frail, Dorothy Black, Clyde 
Wright, Thelma Coombs, Ethel Saun- 
ders, Lavinia Smyth, Dorothy Filene, 
Ruby Hickox, Marion Maxim, Miss 
Eleanor Richmond, Miss Ethel Frail, 
Miss Jennette Martin, Elsa G. Haase, 
Miss Katherine Auryansen, Miss Elean- 
or Martin. 

Miss Douglas will reopen her school 
the fifteenth of September. 


HOSPITAL HKDS AT It HE IMS 


Contributors to the Newton Hospital 
beds to be given at Rheims, France, 
will be interested to know that $14,- 
500 was raised. Newton as a city gave 
one bed, and Auburndale alone anoth- 
er, and there still remained enough 
money to supply many of the necessi- 
ties of the Hospital. Newton muy, in- 
deed, be proud of her part in this good 
work. Special acknowledgment 
should he made to all those who by 
their efforts helped to raise this 
money. 


CHURCH NOTICE 


First Church of Christ, Scientist, of 
Newton. Players’ Hull, Washington 
street, West Newton. Sunday serv- 
ice 10.45 A. M. Subject of lesson-ser- 
mon: "Christian Science,” Sunday 
School 10.45 A. M. Testimonial meet- 
ing Wednesday 8 P. M. The public is 
cordially invited to attend the services 
ami to use the Heading Room at 297 
Walnut street, Newtonville, which is 
I open daily from 2 to 6 in the after- 
noon, und on Tuesday and Suturduy 
evenings from 7.30 until 9. 


United States Food Administration No. (3-0786! 

E. E. GRAY CO. 


Newtonville 
West Newton 


Newton Highlands 
Newton Upper Falls 
Newton Centre 


33% Saved on Groceries 

CUTS FOR WEEK- COMMENCING JUNE 30 

CORN FLAKES, “Gold Medal” pkg. 

SHRIMP, 1919 Pack, 5% oz. can 

PEAS, Fancy Sweet Wrinkled, Grayco Brand, can 

LIME JUICE, Fancy Domestic, large bottle 

SALMON, Red Alaska, flat can 

SARDINES, Pandora Brand, 2 cans for 

Packed in Olive Oil 

PEANUT BUTTER, cut from tub, per lb 

VIENNA SAUSAGE, can 

SOAP, “Good Will,” .4 bars for 

EVAPORATED MILK, Everyday Brand, can 

CIDER VINEGAR, quart bottle 

OLEOMARGARINE, Swift’s Premium Prints,, .per tb 

SODA CRACKERS, N. B. C per tb 

PRUNES, ready to eat 3 cans for 


LUDWIG FURS 







NEW MODELS FOR FALL AND WINTER OF 1919 
NOW RJEADY 



Maternity 

Gowns 

Skirts 

Smocks 

Petticoats 

FULL LINE 

Summer Dresses 

Maternity Corsets, 
Brassieres, Ruffles 


Miss Creed 

7 Temple Place, Boston 


Oriental 
Tea Company 

85-87 Court Street, Scoilay So. 
BOSTON 

"Sign of Big Gold Tea Kettle’' 
NOTED FOR ITS 

Quality COFFEES 
Quality TEAS 

Only Exclusive Tea and Coffee 
House in New England 

« 60 Years In the Same Location 

Our Teas and Coffees Are Dependable 

Mail and Telephone orders given 
special attention. 


The School 
Specializing in 
Business Efficiency 

Macdonald 
Commercial School 

Stenography, Typewriting 
and Bookkeeping 

Boylston St., Boston 

LITTLE BUILDING ' 
Tel. Beach 4822 


Children’s Hair Cutting 

Young Women's Hair “Bobbed” 
Marcel Wave, Shampooing and 
Facial Massage 

Individual attention given by 
experts 

SALONE Dl PIACERE 

Joseph A. Mcrenda, Prop. 
Formerly with Leading Hair 
Cutting Parlors of Boston 

Room 714 Blake Bldg. 

59 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON 
Tel. Beach 1133 


Miss MacConnell 

Hair Dressing. Face Treatment 
Manicure, Chiropody, Toilet Articles 
Moles, Warts and Superfluous Hair Removed 

429 CENTRE STREET 

Over Hubbard’s Pharmacy 


HIGHEST PRICES 

Paid for bonds, diamonds, emeralds, 
pearls. Jewelry, platinum, old sold and 
■liver; Coll. Loan tickets bought and 
loaned on; see us before selling. J. 
HOY, 77 Summer St., Huston. Room 51. 
Est. 16 years; bank ref. 



For 

Table Water 
of 

Delicious 

Purity 

and 

Exceptional 

Softness 


Nobscot Spring Water 


meets all the requirements. A health-giving necessity for 
every day in the year. Bottled and sealed at the spring in 
Framingham, Mass. 

Your Grocer Can Supply You 
If his policy is not to accommodate customers, advise us 
and we will give you names of grocers in your vicinity who 
are accommodating. 

Arrangements may be made to have Nobscot Water de- 
livered ;Nso at your summer home. 

Nobscot Mt. Spring Company 

Established 1892 

173 MILK STREET - . . BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone Fort Hill 860 









TIIF NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1919. 



BRACELET WATCHES 

FOR GRADUATES 

Extensive assortment of the popular small size Waltham, 
Elgin, Illinois and Hamilton models in 14k gold and 25 
year gold filled, at prices from $20 to $75 

Latest style watches for young men, Waltham, Elgin, 
Hamilton and Illinois movements, at prices from $15 to $40 


-The E. B. Horn Co.- 


ESTABLISHED IN 1839 

429 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON 


r ★ ★ 

De Meritte School 

0 Summer Session 

® 815 Bojrlston St., Ronton, Mass. 

A 9 A. M. Tel. B, B. 701-K Apply now 
L Six Star Courses 

L Review Preparatory 

★ ★ ±_ 


11 SILK 

Holeproof 

=HOSE= 


W E are pleased to 
announce that the 
arrival yesterday 
of a second very 
large shipment of Silk Hole- 
proof Hose puts us again in 
position to fill all orders 
from this extremely popular 
brand. 

This big assortment in- 
cludes Black, White, Field 
Mouse, Gray, Taupe, African 
Brown and Cordovan shades 
in hemmed top and full 
fashioned styles for women, 
and the same colors in 
smooth fitting styles for 
men. 

Quick selling is certain. 
We advise BUY NOW! 
FOR WOMEN 

(3 Pairs in a Box) 

Hemmed Top $3.75 

Full Fashioned $6.75 

FOR MEN 

(3 Pairs in a Box) 

Silk $2.55 

Extra Heavy $3.30 

Assortments Also tor Boys and Girls. 
Delivery Paid in New England. 

TALBOT CO. 

395-403 Washington St. 
BOSTON 


STILL ON STRIKE 


June 16th, Newton carpenters went 
on strike for $1.09 per hour, an in- 
crease of over 40 per cent. — a much 
larger increase than they are striking 
for in Boston, where they have been 
out since May 12th. 

The Newton Builders’ Association 
would like to go on record as having 
tried to avert this tie up of what lit- 
tle work there is being done at the 
present time. 

The Carpenters’ District Council 
asked for a conference with the New- 
ton Builders’ Association for June 5tli. 
At this conference the District Coun- 
cil through its representative made a 
proposition that tne builders make a 
settlement on 85 cents per hour until 
the Boston strike was settled. After 
some discussion the Newton Builders' 
Association made a counter proposi- 
tion of 75 cents per hour; — an increase 
of 40 cents per day to take effect at 
once, and when the Boston strike is 
settled pay whatever is settled on 
there. 

This proposition was turned down 
flat by the District Council. At the 
regular meeting of the Newton Build- 
ers’ Association, June 9th, the ques- 
tion was thoroughly discussed, and in 
order to avert a strike, the Associa- 
tion made one more effort, and a prop- 
osition of 80 cents per hour to be in 
force for one year. 

The only reply that was received to 
this communication, was for all the 
carpenters to go out on strike June 
16th for $1.00 per hour. 

The Newton Builders’ Association 
feel it a duty to inform the public of 
the exact situation. They also feel 
that very many of the better class of 
carpenters were not at all in sym- 
pathy with the strike, and would much 
rather have kept at work. 

Newton Builders’ Association. 

By F. W. Stevens, 

Secretary of Committee. 


NEWTON RED CROSS 


Appeal for Summer Work 



Fine Stationery, Engraving and 
Printing, Wedding Announce- 
ments nml Club Invita- 
tions, Reception and 
Ylsitlng Cards 

OFFICE SUPPLY HOUSE 
57-G1 Franklin St, Boston 


I Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Middlesex, ss. 

\ PROBATE COURT. 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin, credi- 
tors, and all other persons interest- 
ed in the estate of Mary Levesque 
late of Newton in said County, de- 
ceased, intestate. 

WHEREAS a petition has been pre- 
sented to said Court to grant a letter 
of administration on the estate of said 
deceased to Ida Marchant of Water- 
town in the County of Middlesex, 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a 
Probate Court to be held at Cam- 
bridge, in said County of Middlesex, 
►on the eighth day of July A. D. 1919, 
at nine o’clock in the forenoon, to 
show cause if any you have, why the 
same should not be granted. 

And the petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in bach 
week, for three successive weeks, in 
'the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the lust publication 
to be one day, at least, before said 
Court. 

Witness, Charles J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
eighteenth day of June in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
'J^ine 20-27-July 4 


You of the Junior Auxiliary of New- 
ton have made for yourselves a most 
creditable and commendable record 
as Red Cross workers. Today the 
Newton Junior Red Cross has a mem 
bership of 8,030 and in the last 
twelve months it made 3,895 articles 
of clothing for the suffering people 
of Europe. 

You are asked to continue your good 
work and to do what you can to help 
those who have nothing, because of 
the war. 

The Newton Chapter of the Red 
Cross now asks you to give part of 
your time during the summer to knit- 
ting for the children of Europe to 
keep them warm next winter. The 
Newton Chapter will furnish the wool, 
it asks you to furnish the willing 
fingers to make mufflers and stock- 
ings and sweaters. If each girl will 
knit one article, think how many 
children will be happier next winter. 

Every knitted article sent to the 
needy children of Europe will carry 
the message that America does not 
forget the children of those who, with 
her sons, fought for the ideals of 
liberty and civilization and gave^their 
lives that those ideals might live. 

Wool and instructions may be had 
tree of charge in each village. No- 
tices will be posted in the Post Offices 
and Library Reading Rooms as to time 
and place of getting supplies. 


NEWTON 25 YEARS AGO 



WEDDING GIFTS 
in 

Silver and Cut Glass 
Lowest Prices Always 
*>41 SUMMER ST. BOSTON ** 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
I Middlesex, ss. 

PROBATE COURT. 


Notice Is Hereby Given that the sub- 
scribers have been duly appointed ex- 
ecutors of the will of John Q. A. Whit- 
temoro lute of Newton in the County 
of Middlesex, deceased, tOBtate, and 
|uve taken upon themselves that trust 
•by giving bonds, as the law directs. 
All persons having demands upon the 
estate of suid deceased ure hereby re- 
quired to exhibit the same; and all 
persons indebted to suid estate ure 
V* called upon to make payment to 

CHARLOTTE E. WH ITTEMQRE, 
LOUIS M. 1IANNUM, 
Executors. 

(Address) 

No. 2 Washington St., Newton, Mass. 

May seventh, 1919. 
fuaiie 20-27-July 4 


It Pays to Advertise 


To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of William B. Bosson late of 
Newton in said County, deceased. 
WHEREAS, a certain instrument 
purporting to bo the last will and tes- 
tament of said deceased has been pre- 
sented to said Court, for Probate, by 
Edward P. Bosson who prays that 
letters testamentary may be issued to 
him, teh executor thorein named, 
without giving a surety on his official 
bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at 
a Probate Court, to be held at Cam- 
bridge in sahl^ County of Middlesex, 
on the seventirday of July A. D. 1919, 
at nine o'clock in the forenoou, to 
show cause, if any you have, why the 
same should not be granted. 

Ami said petitioner is hereby direct- 
ed to give public notice thereof, by 
publishing this citation once in each 
week, for threo successive weeks, in 
the Newton Graphic a newspaper pub- 
lished in Newton the last publication 
to be one duy, at least, before said 
Court, and by mailing postpaid, or de- 
livering a copy of this citation to all 
known pursuits interested in the es- 
tate, fourteen duys ut least before suid 
Court. 

Witness, diaries J. Mclntlre, Es- 
quire, First Judge of said Court, this 
thirteenth duy of June in the year one 
thousuml nine hundred ami nineteen. 

F. M. ESTY, Register. 
June 20-27-July 4 


From the Newton Graphic of June 22, 
1891 

Death of Mr. James V. Sullivan of 
Newton. 

Committee organized with Mr. A. F. 
Luke as chairman to raise a fund as 
a testimonial to the late Chief Bixby. 

Ladies hold tennis tournament on 
Y. M. C. A. courts on Richardson 
street,' Miss Nickerson defeating Miss 
ijoring in the finals. 

Official inspection of the new home 
for Working Boys on Winchester 
street, Newton Highlands. 

Bray Block. Newton Centre, prac- 
tically completed, is' “undoubtedly the 
finest business block in the suburbs 
of Boston.” 

Reception given by Dir. and Mrs. 
Theodore Nickerson of West Newton 
for their daughter, Miss Ella Winifred 
Nickerson. 

June 29 

Wedding of Miss Emma M. Dalby 
and Mr. Frederick S. White. 

Miss Margaret Morton Nickerson 
gives the Salutatory at graduation ex- 
ercises of the Newton High School. 

Neighborhood Club holds its an- 
nual invitation tennis with Fred H. 
Ilovey, Malcolm H. Chase, Clarence 
Hobart, R. D. Wrenn and Arthur 
Foote entered. (fli 

Class jaf 1894 presents Lasell Sem- 
inary with stained glass panel. 

Graduation exercises at Nurses’ 
Training School at Hospital. 

George S. Rice appointed a member 
of the Water Board. 

Large hearing held at City Hall on 
taking of land on Charles river near 
the Boat Club for park purposes. 

Crowell grain elevator on Church 
street (present Y. M. C. A. Grounds) 
destroyed fcy wild switching of nine 
coal cars on B. & A. railroad siding. 

Wedding of Mr. Henry T. Hesse and 
Eleanor S. Clarke. 

Wedding of Miss Grace Q. Bird of 
Newtonviile and Mr. Henry Water- 
man, Jr. 

F^awn party given by Mrs. D. C. 
Heath to graduating class of High 
School. 

George A. Gleason publicly installed 
as master of Dalhousie lodge. 

Death of Mr. Ivory Harmon of Oak 
Hill. 


FUNERAL OF MRS. MORSE 


Many friends of Mrs. Clara Rebec- 
ca Morse attended her funeral, which 
took place Tuesday afternoon from 
her late home at 120 Court street in 
Newtonviile. 

Two clergymen, Rev. Richard T. 
Loring and Rev. Samuel Lane Loomis, 
shared in conducting the services. 

The ministrations of the two clergy- 
men were interspersed by several se- 
lections sung by a male quartet whose 
numbers were: "One Sweetly Solemn 
Thought,” “Abide with Me,” "Cross- 
ing the Bar,” and "Lead, Kindly 
Light.” 

The pallbearers were Messrs. Thom- 
as J. Kenny, Nicholas Richardson and 
Alan M. Hay, Howard Hackett, Au- 
gustus C. Wiswall, Harry Boit Free- 
man, Hubert Loomis and Edward L. 
Page. The burial took place in the 
family lot in Shawsheen Cemetery in 
Bedford. 


301 


3QE 


30001 


IN THE NEWTONS I 


$8000 to $25,000 

Ready for Occupancy in September 

8 TO 14 ROOMS— 1 TO 5 BATHS 
GARAGE FOR 1 TO 8 CARS 
BUILT OF BRICK, SIDING, OR 
STUCCO 

^ We build to your order on any of our 
Newton estates. We are prepared to 
build very close to pre-war prices. Let 
us show you. 



Make your selection now— First 
because the locations are limited; 
second because we must start your 
house now for occupancy in Sep- 
tember. 

The lots are priced from $1000 up. 
Located on — 

Commonwealth At. 

Chestnut St. 

Howland Rd. 

Grove Hill At. 

Ballough Park 
In Waban 

West Newton 
Newtonviile 


D 



D 




60 STATE STREET 


roc 


roraror 


(OE 


Tel. Main 5305 

30C30E= 


THE FOl'KTH OE .11 I, Y 


The Fire Prevention Commissioner 
for the Metropolitan District ’has is- 
ued a notice in regard to the use of 
fire crackers and fireworks on the 
Fourth of July. 

Firecrackers and fireworks may be 
used or discharged between the hours 
of 6 A. M. and 7 P. M. with illuminat- 
ing fireworks between 7 P. M. and 10 
P. M. 

No torpedo larger than % in. in 
diameter shall bo kept or sold. Tor- 
pedoes must he packed with sawdust 
in paper cartons and these in wooden 
cases. 

No fireworks nor firecrackers, ex- 
cepting the toy torpedo or the single 
toy paper cap, shall be sold to chil- 
dren under thirteen years of age.* 

No firecracker exceeding 2 in. in 
length and three-eighths in diameter 
containing gunpowder and no fire- 
cracker of greater explosive power 
shall be sold, kept for sale or set off. 

No fireworks or firecrackers shall 
be set off within 300 feet of any hos- 
pital. 

No serpents, rockets, bombs or set 
pieces of fireworks shall be set off in 
a public street or public way. 

No rockets, bombs, aerial shells, 
Roman candles, Italian batteries or 
set pieces shall be set off except under 
the charge of an experienced adult 
person. 

No smoking shall be allowed in any 
place where fireworks or firecrackers 
are handled in stock for sale or dis- 
play. 

n the display of fireworks great 
care shall be exercised by the man- 


agement and those in authority pres- 
ent, that the place which the bystand- 
ers occupy shall be beyond the dan- 
ger area. 

Those persons who feel that fire- 
works are necessary on that day 
should use the utmost care in the 
handling of them to the end that 
neither life nor property shall be de- 
stroyed and that this day which should 
be one of rejoicing is not marred and 
homes made desolate because of acci- 
dents and fires resulting from the use 
thereof. 


CENTRAL SQUARE THEATRE 


How “Big Business” relaxes and 
spends its swollen profits on the mid- 
night pleasures of Broadway is vivid- 
ly shown in "Mary Regan” the first 
National feature which is to be seen 
at Gordon’s Cambridge Central Square 
Theatre, next Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday. 

There is to be a wonderful bill of 
vaudeville to be shown, headed by 
Marshall Montgomery, world’s pre- 
mier ventriloquist; Little Goshi, a 
Japanese acrobat; Earle and Sun- 
shine, in a singing and dancing act 
entitled “Today and Yesterday”; Kel- 
so and Leighton, comedy singing and 
talking act "Here and There in Vaude- 
ville” and Amea Chandler. 

There will be an entire change of 
vaudeville and photoplays Thursday. 
Friday and Saturday, featuring Bry- 
ant Washburn in “Putting It Over.” 

Grand Sacred Concert every Sunday 
evening. 

It is thirty degrees cooler in this 
theatre than it is outsicle. 


WINS HONORS 

James H. Crowdle of Newton ha3 
won further honors in his scholastic 
career, according to advices from 
Canisius College. Buffalo. N. Y., where 
he was graduated with the degree of 
master of sciences. 

A member of the Boston College 
class of ’18, and .fine of the youngest 
members of his class, both in High 
School and college, he was a medal 
| of honor man at college and gradu- 
! ated "cum laude.” Following the 
j completion of his work at Boston Col- 
lege. he went to Philadelphia, where 
he studied at the Philadelphia Tech- 
1 nical School, completing a 12 weeks’ 
[course in just half of that time. This 
fitted him as a chemist, and he Im- 
mediately went into Government serv- 
! ice in the Ordnance Department. 

He was assigned as assistant chemist 
i to a plant in Drummondville. Canada, 
in charge of high explosives, and 
shortly after the armistice renewed 
his studies and entered Canisius Col- 
lege, where he won further honors. 
He was selected to deliver the mas- 
ter’s oration at the Commencement 
exercises. 


AUKMME INSURANCE 

AT COST 
• yiJuj Pa, y_ Wore • 

Massachusetts Mutual Aut a Ins. C a 
Automobile Mutual Liability Ins. Ca 
lo Central Street, Boston 


INSURANCE 

AUTOMOBILE 

FIRE 

ACCIDENT 

HEALTn and 
LIFE 

HERBERT GALLAGHER 

99 Park St., Newton, Mass. 

Tel. Newton North II 

A NEWTON REAL ESTATE ^ 

ALVORD BROS.. 

(Established 25 years) 

Main Office. 79 Milk St.. Boston, Mass. 
Loral Office, opp. Newton Centre Depot 

We qolicit the listing of all Newton 
land and houses for salo or to let 

INSURANCE AUCTIONEERS 
EXPERT APPRAISERS ^ 

Old Natick Inn 

SOUTH NATICK, MASS. 


ATTENTION is especUilly^ called to t v .e adv. 


of FRANK A 10CKE. tnc tuner 



PURITY 


So-CO-ny Motor Gasoline is clean in the 
tank and clean in the burning. Its purity 
gives uniform, hard-hitting power — keeps 
the cylinders clean — the carburetor free 
and adjusted for good, alike in truck and 
pleasure car. 

So-CO-ny vaporizes readily in all seasons 
—gives quick starts and energetic engine 
action for all needs. You can "depend on 
So-COny today and every day. 
Unknown, inferior mixtures can never 
give you the confidence that So'CO-ny 
does or your truck the same efficiency. 
Look for the Red, White and Blue 
So-CO-ny sign. 

STANDARD OIL CO. OF NEW YORK 


The sisn of a reliable dealer 
and the worlds best Gasoline 









Just the right distance from Newton to 
motor to dinner 

TeL Natick S610 MISS HARRIS. Mgr. 



HINCKLEY & WOODS 
INSURANCE 
98 MILK ST. 
BOSTON 


FIR* 
LIABIL- 
ITY. AUTO- 
MOBILE, BUR- 
GLARY AND EVERY 
DESCRIPTION OF INSUR- 
ANCE AT LOWEST RATES. 
Tdi. 1445. 14M. 1457. 14tI.l(M.4USI4mhii 


naaaivvD h 

CARPENTER and CABINET MAKER 
Telephone 2150 Newton North 
Jobbing Promptly Attended To 
Residence: 

11 Ronmere Rd., NewtonTille 

Telephone 2844-W Newton North 


PIANO 


-rurviNC 


_ Soecialiat on all piano trouble* 

Boitoa office, 10 Brcmfield St. Telepboa- in Rescue* 
Dvnr 20 year* experience Refer* to hi* many patron*, among 
•Horn are Ex-Go». Brackett. Hon. Sam u ei W. McCall. E. 
Harold Croeby Boston Dramatic Editor and Critic, 

Cyrus Dalian the famous Sculptor. Philip Stockton, Pres. Old 
Colony Trust Co. J. J. Martm. Pre*. Excban.-e Trust Co. 
Neeton reference*. Freedom Hutchin»on, Ret.Gro. S. Butter*, 
Supt. Garrity Met. Life ins. Co.. Messrs Webster. Curtis, 
fcanway. Roger W. Babs^n. (Weiles ey) and many other well 
known Newton people. Newton office, C. E. .'ossefyo’s period- 
ical Store. 340 Centre Street. 

,i.OC/C£: 

j TeL Bellevue S76-W. Mail to Beaton. P.O.Box 1750 

W. H. WALLACE, Builder 

36 Vernon St, Xewton * 
N. X. 76S-J " j 

Remodeling, Booting and Jobbing 
promptly attended to 
Orders taken at 744 Elmwood St 
1 __ X. >. 593- W 

TBACHKRS 


L. EDWIN CHASE 

T«ach«r of 

Violin Mandolin Guitar 

Will Receive Pupil* After OeB. 10 At HI* 
NEW 9TLD10 
BIS WASHINGTON STREET 
(Opp. K. U. HtBtiou) 

NEWTON V11.LK 

Telephone: New tun WnI IMS-M 

ADDRESS : 2202 COMMONWEALTH AYE.. AUSURNOALE 



G. P. ATKINS 

396 Centre Street, Newton 






THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, „(JNE 27, 1010. 


P. P. ADAMS’ BI6 DEPARTMENT STORE, WALTHAM 


SHOES 

For Every Summer Need 

There’s style here for evefy fancy — for Women, Men, 
Boys, Girrs, or Children. The selection of the Summer 
Footwear is made easy by our unusual assortments. It’s 
a good thing to remember, too, that the store sells none 
but reliable makes, and that every pair you buy represents 
best possible value at the price. 

WOMEN’S LOW SHOE, $3.95 

A very special value in Black Kid. New and attractive 
Last . $3.95 

WOMEN’S DARK TAN LOW SHOES 

Just the shade wanted. Just the neatest looking Shoe 
at a low price that we’ve seen this season. $3.95 

WOMEN’S WHITE CANVAS PUMPS 

For vacation wear you’ll surely need a Shoe like this. 
Neat, comfortable and decidedly dressy $1.69 

SUMMER SHOES FOR CHILDREN and MISSES 

The One Strap Mary Jane. Most popular Shoe for 
Summer wear $1.69 

PUMPS FOR MISSES and CHILDREN 

White Canvas. From one of our best makers. Every 
pair perfect $2.00 

BOYS’ BROWN TENNIS, 98c 

The money-saving vacation Shoe. Any size 98c 

Heres a Really Superior Shoe 
For Men at $6.50 

A style selected after careful survey of every line made 
to sell at the price. Combines more real good Shoe value 
than any we’ve seen. Good looking, good wearing, com- 
fortable, perfect fitting. We’re willing to stand behind 
every pair we sell. The price is only $6.50 


LEGAL STAMPS 


FREE DELIVERY 


P. P. ADAMS’ 

Big Department Store 

133-139 Moody Street Waltham 


JACKSON— EBY 


At noon. Tuesday, June 10, the wed- 
ding of Mr. Leonard D. Jackson, of 
West Newton, and Miss Ethel Viola 
Eby. the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Eby. took place at the home of 
the bride in Shannon, 111., the cere- 
mony being performed by the Rev. J. 
W. Davis, pastor of the Bethel Church 
of that place. 

The home was beautifully decorated 
with white and pink carnations, pe- 
onies and smilax. 

Miss Marguerite Bauscher of Free- 
port acted as maid of honor, while 
Earl Deery. also of Freeport, acted as 
best man. The ring bearer was little 
Winona Myers of Lanark, a niece. 

The bride was very tastily dressed 
in white Georgette crepe and wore a 
beautiful flowing bridal veil. She car- 
ried a shower bouquet of Ophelia 
roses and swainsonia, and made a de- 


cidedly attractive appearance. The 
groom was attired in military uniform. 
The bridesmaid appeared in blue 
Georgette crepe, wearing a pretty 
corsage bouquet. 

Only a few friemlfc, aside from rel- 
atives witnessed the ceremony, and 
after a most palatable wedding din- 
ner, Mr. and Mrs. Jackson departed 
for Chicago, and from there to West 
Newton. Mass., to spend a brief honey- 
moon with his parents. They were 
the recipients of many beautiful and 
useful gifts. 

The groom is and has been in the 
service of Uncle Sara, and at present 
is army field clerk at ('amp Grant. 
He is the only son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank A. Jackson of West Newtoh. 

After their two weeks’ visit at West 
Newton, they will return to Rockford 
and remain until he receives his dis- 
charge, after which they will go east 
to make their future home. 


HARDWOOD FLOORS 

Parquetry flooring ami wood carpets mod- 
ernize floors. Hstlmates given. 

W0LFS0N FLOORING CO. 

Expert Designers, Manufacturers, 
Contractors 

42-44 MAIN STREET 

Tel. Everett 1710 Everett 


wattm 


SAW 


GINGER ALE 

WHAT ARF YOU DOING TO 
KEEP COOL? 

Ko. weather has h i us — we talk about 
tb« heat, but we never stop to think that 
it ’ food as well as clothes that keep us 
warm. 

For a real satisfying, refreshing drink 
— c j?c t! a ’s £oad for ye*.*, tc ~ — rwxt time 
orde WHITE HOUSE "URF. GINGER 
ALE. 

Order it by name 

Standard Bottling & Extract Co. 

73 Harvard St. 

BOSTON 


STOOD FOR HUMAN LIBERTY 


Jean Jacques Rousseau Had Right 
Conception of Conditions That 
Made for Freedom. 


Prof. Kenneth Colegrove of Syra- 
cuse university declares that world de- 
mocracy Is the sole basis of world 
peace. Writing In the World’s Work 
he snys: 

In the year 1713, when the ambassa- 
dors of the European powers were en- 
gaged at the congress of Utrecht In 
bringing to a close the War of the 
Spanish Succession, the Abbe de Saint- 
Pierre was writing the final pages of 
his little treatise called the “Project 
for Perpetual Peace." He proposed 
confederation of the kings and princes 
of Europe, with a congress or diet of 
ambassadors where all disputes be- 
tween the different states should be 
settled by arbitration, and whore gen- 
eral rules should be adopted from time 
to time for the purpose of prrfmotlng 
the peace and welfare of each and 
every realm. Rousseau criticized the 
ahbe’s plan, declaring it contained one 
flaw, a flaw which vitiated the other- 
wise noble plan. He believed that a 
confederation of European states 
could never be formed so long as 
kings and princes ruled. For the es- 
sence of kingship was nothing else 
than the passion to extend Its domin- 
ion without and Its absolutism within; 
and no plnn of confederation, Rous- 
seau was convinced, would ever be 
able to quench the old fires of rivalry 
and despotism. But even If a general 
alliance of European monarchs were 
possible, it was manifestly Impossible 
to guarantee princes against the revolt 
of their people unless at the same time 
subjects were given a guaranty against 
the tyranny of their rulers. In launch- 
ing this latter criticism against the 
abbe’s project the author of the "So- 
cial Contract" foresaw the contingency 
of the Holy Alliance of 1815, when the 
autocrats of Europe called the Indivis- 
ible Trinity to witness that, as broth- 
ers of the same family, they would de- 
fend the doctrine of the divine right of 
kings against the contradiction of rev- 
olution wherever it should appear. 

Yet more trenchant was the criti- 
cism of Voltaire. “The peace Imag- 
ined by the Abbe de Saint-Pierre,” said 
the philosopher of Fernay, “Is a chi- 
mera which could no more subsist be- 
tween princes than between elephants 
and rhinoceroses, or between wolves 
and dogs. Carnivorous animals rush 
to attack each other on all occasions." 
The “Project for Perpetual Peace," ac- 
cording to Voltaire, was not absurd In 
Itself, but In the mnnner of Its pro- 
posal. There would always be wars 
of ambition and conquest, untH people 
learned that It was only a small num- 
ber of generals and ministers who 
profited thereby. 


Name Mountain “Roosevelt” 

Impressive ceremonies attended by 
many soldier and civilian friends of 
the former president will mark the 
dedication of Mount Theodore Roose- 
velt on July 4. 

Shortly after the death of Colonel 
Roosevelt the pioneers of the Black 
Hills met at Deadwood, S. D., and de- 
cided to change the name of Sheep 
mountain, near Deadwood, to Mount 
Theodore Roosevelt. Feeling that the 
spirit of Independence day typified 
the Ideals of the late president it wns 
decided to postpone the formal cere- 
mony until then. 

Invitations have been sent to scores 
of Colonel Roosevelt’s friends by Col. 
Seth Bullock. MaJ. Gen. Leonard Wood 
will deliver the dedicatory address. 
Gifford Pinchot, Secretary Lane and 
many other national figures will be 
present. 


Woman's Remarkable Feat. 

The American flag and the British 
Jack flew side by side from the mast 
•of a British warship for the first time 
In the history of the post of Bremer- 
ton, Wash., when Mrs. Bertha Sav- 
age, an employe of the industrial di- 
vision of the navy yard, on u dare, 
climbed to the top of the mast on 
H. M. S. Lancaster as she lay In dock 
and broke out the two ensigns. 

Mrs. Savage, better known to tha 
yard employes as “Montana Liz,” has 
been at the yard for several months. 
She comes from the ranges In Mon- 
tuna and Is well known for her cow- 
boy attire and her picturesque vocab- 
ulary. Her feat In climbing to the 
top of the 130-foot mast was no mean 
accomplishment for a woman. 

The ship’s crew watched the stunt 
with great interest and enthusiastical- 
ly cheered the climber. 


Oxen Again Beasts of Burden. 

The ox as a beast of burden is com- 
ing into Its own again in the farming 
communities of the state, according to 
a dispatch from Lewiston, Me., and 
the oxsling amf apparatus used by 
blacksmiths in shoeing the animals, 
long ago thrown into the discard, is 
in use again. The sling consists of a 
rude frame of timber into which the 
animal is fastened hy a pillory. Straps 
are then drawn under the body, the 
ends being made fast to upper timbers 
of the frame. In blacksmith simps 20 
years ago the slings were common. 
Oxen are less expensive to feed than 
horses and are equally as useful on 
small farms, and tiie rising value of 
feed is having much to do with (lie 
comeback of the ox as a work aulmiil. 


Newt on C entre 

—Mrs. Joseph S. Cordlngly left last 
Saturday for Chatham. Mass. 

— There Is to be a sale on Sept. 18th 
for the benefit of Twombly House. 

—Mr. and Mrs Charles L. Smith of 
I^nke avenue huTP gone to Pemberton, 
Mass. 

— Mr. and Mis. J. F. Capron have 
opened their cottage at Falmouth, 
Mass. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William B. Merrill of 
Ixike terrace go to Salters’ Point early 
in July. 

— Congratulations are being received 
hy Mr. and Mrs. William A. Haskell 
of Commonwealth avenue on the birth 
of a son. 

— Messrs. William C. Brewer. Jr., 
and Robert C. Fitqh graduated this 
week from Williams College with the 
degree of A.B. 

- The Misses Evelyn Jenkins and 
Catherine Wnyd of this village grad- 
uated this week from Boston Univer- 
sity with the degree of A.B. 

— Among the graduates this week at 
Wesleyan University, Middletown, 
Conn., was Mr. F. H. Underhill, son of 
William P. Underhill of Monadnoc and 
Wachuset roads. Chestnut Hill. Mr. 
Underhill received the degree of Bach- 
elor of Science. He served in France 
in the late war, enlisting on the 14th 
of May, 1917, and held rank of lieu- 
tenant. 

— Mrs. Abbie E. Thomas, the widow 
of the late Rev. Jesse B. Thomas, and 
a former well known resident of this 
village, died last Saturday at the home 
of her daughter In Hackensack, N. J. 
Mrs. Thomas Is survived by two sons, 
Rev. Dr. Raphael C. Thomas, who Is In 
the Philippines, and Rev. Leo B. Thom- 
as of Framingham, and two daughters, 
Mrs. M. E. Leslie of Hackensack and 
Mrs. E. E. Harrington, of Liverpool, 
Eng. 


DOANE— FARRIS 


Miss Mabel Winthrop Farris, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. William R. Farris, 
of 21 Boardman street, Salem, and Mr. 
Henry Knowles Donne, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Alfred O. Doane of Newtonville, 
were jnarrled at the First Universal- 
ist Church. Salem, on Wednesday eve- 
ning. Rev. George H. Howes of Pea- 
body officiated, and the double ring 
service was performed in the presence 
of only the immediate families of the 
couple. Mr. and Mrs. Doane will be 
at home, after September 1, at 21 Jen- 
ison street, Newtonville. No cards. 


West Newton 

— Mr. A. S. Pratt. Jr., graduated this 
week from Williams college with the 
degree of A. B. 

— Hon. and Mrs. George Hutchinson 
of Chestnut street have opened their 
summer home in Marshfield. 

— West Newton Co-operntive Hank. 
Start an aeeoiint this month. 1 to 40 
shares at $1.00 eaehw Advt. 

The Waltham Colonial Singing Or- 
chestra will play at the Brae Burn 
Country Club Snturday night. 

— Among the graduates this week 
from Boston University wero Miss 
Blanche O. Berry with the degree of 
B.S., Mr. Joseph M. Hargedon from the 
school of Law and Mary A. Blake with 
the degree of A.M. from the graduate 
school. 

— Two automobiles collided Tuesday 
morning at the corner of Cherry nnd 
Webster streets. The cars were owned 
and operated by Alice R. Connell, Wal- 
tham, and Benjamin Santeson of 48 
Derby street. Neither of the occupants 
was injured, although both machines 
sustained damage. 

— At a recent meeting of the Execu- 
tive Council of New Hampshire held at 
Concord the following action was 
taken: "Upon motion of Councilor 
Welpley, it was Voted, that the Secre- 
tary of State be authorized to convey 
to Arthur Emmons Pearson of New- 
ton, Massachusetts, the appreciation of 
the New Hampshire State Government 
for his recent gift at Valley Forge of 
a memorial to New Hampshire men 
who served under Washington in the 
Valley Forge encampment of 1777- 
1778.” 

— On Monday the pupils of Miss 
Mary Josephine White held a recital 
at the Newton Catholic Club. The pro- 
gram included several recitations and 
two plays. Those who took part were 
Helen O’Neil, Agnes Rycroft, Georgi- 
anna Wyler, Dorothy and Mary Duane, 
Margaret Kelly, Mary Brown, Gene- 
vieve Ford, Mary Kearns, Mary O’Neil, 
Marie Kerns, Catherine Curran, Celia 
Sullivan, Mary Sullivan. In "Wings of 
Mignonette" were Josephine O’Brien, 
Martha Heffron, Helen Priest, Mary 
Duane, Mary Keefe, Dorothy Duane, 
Margaret Kelly, Irene Hoban, Marie 
Barry. Margaret Cronin, Rosalie Milli- 
gan. In “The Dolls’ Frolic” were Mary 
Sullivan, Celia Sullivan, Gertrude 
Romkey, Gertrude Vail, Grace Sulli- 
van, Georgianna Wyler, Margaret 
Riley, Marie Barry, Margaret Cronin, 
Mary O’Neil. 


HENRY MURRAY 

—COMPANY- — 

Established 1870 

DESIGNERS AND MAKERS OF 

Monuments and Memorial Tablets 

GRAN ITE— MARBLE— SLATE 

many years of experience in Memorial Art we believe to be 
of value to all interested in selecting work of this character. 

'T* HE aim of our firm has always been to gain the confidence of its 
* patrons by a thorough understanding of each individual case, 
and to retain it by the high quality of its work. 

(We furnish duplicates of markers and cut lettering upon 
monuments already in place.) 

21 ARLINGTON STREET, BOSTON Phone Back Bay 82 
Works at Brighton 


Opposite 

Library j 


NEWTON TAILORING CO. 413 Centre St. Newton PQbSc _ 

Ladies’ and Men’s Fine Tailoring 

m mada tn nrdar In laiaaf alvUa » « v* • ^ 


Suit* made to ordor In latest styles. Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and Repairing j 

LADIES' GARMENTS and FURS ALTERED A SPECIALTY 

Special arranyementa for monthly i 
•.SO. Tel. 704-W Newton Nerih 


Work called for and delivered. 

Open Rveninye 


West Newton 

— Mr. and Mrs. John W. Davidge 
(Katherine S. Weeks) of Washington 
D. C. t are being congratulated on the 
recent birth of a son. 

— Mr. Frederick Dixon, editor of the 
Christian Science Monitor will occupy 
the Jaynes House on Prince street dur- 
ing thjB summer months. 

— Services will be held in the Second 
Church next Sunday and every Sunday 
in July, at 10.45 A. M. Next Sunday 
Mr. Park will be the preacher. 

— Mr. Harlan D. Crowell will be the 
superintendent of the Sunday School 
of the Second Church and leader of the 
Boy Scouts, beginning next fall. 

— Rev. J. C. Jaynes left this week for 
his summer home at Southport, P. E. 
I., making a part of the trip hy auto- 
mobile. Mrs. Jaynes will go a week 
or so later. 


West Ne wton 

— Mr. William B. Whidden graduated s 
this week from Williams College with 
the degree of A.B. 

—Mr. Ernest S. Gile has been elected 
a member of the executive committee 
of the Dartmouth Alumni Association. 


LEONA’S 

HOME-MADE CANDIES 

1266 WASHINGTON STREET 
WEST .NEWTON, MASS. 

Tel. Newton West 1256-R 
CHOCOLATES AND BON-BONS 
Made Fresh Every Day 
Ice Cream Served Also 


DON’T FORGET 


that a neglected piano 
la soon out of commie- 
alon. FRANK A. LOCKE tune 


Experienced In Munition Making. 

Llanelly, Wales, did its hit In the 
matter of munitions long before the 
great war. At the beginning, of the 
nineteenth century Mr. Raliy, the great 
local Ironworker, cast a large quan 
tlty of shot for the government. 
Earlier still, when Cromwell was be 
sieging Pembroke cqstle, much of the 
shot were supplied from the Lluuelly 
district. 


The Food For, Those IF ho 
Seek Achievement 

“I only wish to point out," says Dr. McCollum of Johns Hop" 
kins University, “that milk is an INDISPENSABLE article of die* 1 
of any people who wish to achieve. 

“Without the continued use of milk, not only for the feeding 
of our children, but in liberal amounts in cookery and as an 
adjunct to our diet, we cannot as a nation maintain the position 
as a world power to which we have arisen." 

The average daily milk consumption per capita in this country 
is LESS THAN HALF A PINT ! 

Drink more milk. It’s good for you. 


U. S. Dept, of Agriculture 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Massachusetts State Department of 
Agriculture 

Boston Board of Health 
Boston Chamber of Commerce 
National Civic Federation 


A Message to Food Users From Representatives of the 

Brookline Health Center 
Boston Social Union 
League of Catholic Women 
Salvation Army * 


Women’s Municipal League 
Special Aid Society 
Boston Committee for Public 
Service 

Dietetic Bureau, League for Pre- 
ventive Work 


(And Others, Co-operating) 


I 






THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1010. 


FORD MARKET CO. 

297 CENTRE STREET, NEWTON 
Telephones Newton North 61 — 62 — 63 A. J. Ford, Prop. 

United States Food Administration No. G 107544 

HINDS OF GENUINE SPRING LAMB per ft 42c 

SIRLOIN TIP and 1ST CUT OF RIB per ft 50c 

SIRLOIN and PORTER HOUSE ROAST per ft 55c 

SIRLOIN and PORTER HOUSE STEAK per ft 55c 

TOP OF ROUND per ft 45c 

CORNED TONGUES (Large) per ft 40c 

FANCY BRISKET CORNED BEEF per ft 35c 

LOIN or LEG OF VEAL per ft 35-38c 

Fresh Salmon 50c 

Fresh Mackerel 25c 
Freoh Halibut 40c 

New Potatoes 65c pk 
Old Potatoes $1.25 bu 
Green Peas $1.25 pk 
(native) 

Asparagus 20c 

Rhubarb 3 lbs for 20c 

Pineapples 
Bananas 

WE CLOSE WEDNESDAY AT NOON DURING THE SUMMER 
SATURDAY AT 9.30 P. M. . 

TWO DELIVERIES DAILY— 10 A. M., 2 P. M. 

ONE DELIVERY TO NEWTONVILLE EVERY P. M. 


Haddock 

10c 

Butterfish 

25c 

Cod 

10c 

Lobsters 

55c 

Flounders 

15c 

Salt Cod 

25c 

Bunch Beets 

10c 

Tomatoes 

25c tb 

Green Beans 

15c 

Cucumbers 

12^c 

Butter Beans 

15c 

Lettuce 

8c 

Spinach 

25c 

New Carrots 

12^c 

Peppers 

8c 

Squash 

7c 

Scallions 

5c 



Strawberries 


Cantelopes 


Oranges 


Lemons 



Newton 



THE LATE R. W. WILLIAMSON 


•FORMER RESIDENT DEAD 

4 - Mr. Robert Warden Williamson, for 
many years a well known resident of 

S 'est Newton, died suddenly last night 
the Booth Theatre, New York City. 
Mr. Williamson was in New York on 
a business trip and while in the thea- 
tre was taken ill. He was taken out 
of the theatre but died before an am- 
bulance, which was summoned to take 
him to the hospital, had arrived. 

Mr. Williamson was born in Albany, 
N. Y., August 18, 1861, and came to 
West Newton about 1804 to reside. He 
married Miss Elizabeth Freeman Met- 
calf, the daughter of the late Albert 
Metcalf, and resided on Highland 
street, in the house now occupied by 
Mr. Crooker. The family removed to 
♦Beacon street, Coolidge Corner, sever- 
al years ago. Mr. Williamson served 
/is a member of the aldermen from 
1908 to 1912. 

He was the senior member of the 
firm of Williamson & Sleeper, dealers 
in ladies’ hats. 

Mr. Williamson was a director of 
the Fourth-Atlantic Bank and the E. 
C. Mills Leather Co. of Boston and the 
First National Bank of West Newton. 

Mr. Williamson is survived by his 
widow and two daughters, the Misses 
Margaret and Clara R. Williamson 


Lower Falls 

— Mr. Philip A. Endholm graduated 
this week from Tufts college with the 
degree of D.M.D. 

— Miss Florence Duncan of Newton 
Lower Falls graduated Wednesday 
from the Framingham Normal School. 

— On Friday evening, June 20th the 
members of the Girls’ Friendly Soci- 
ety of St. Mary’s Church gave a sur- 
prise party to their Branch Secretary, 
Miss Emily F. Jordan. With kind 
words of their appreciation of her 
work with them, Miss Ayles, in be- 
l.half of the Society presented her with 
T.a five dollar gold piece. Refreshments 
| were served by the girls and ^ pleas- 
I ant evening followed. 


AuDuridfilt 

— Miss Dorothy Weeks graduated on 
'Wednesday from the Framingham Nor- 
mal School. 

— Mr. F. N. Grantham and family 
of Vista avenue are at Naples, Me., for 
the summer. 

— Miss Helen M. Woodwhrd, gradu- 
ated this week from the Bridgewater 
Normal school. 

— Mias Stella Chiasson of Auburn- 
(lale graduated from the Framingham 
Normal School Wednesday morning. 


Newton 


— Mr. and Mrs. Goldwin S. Sprague 
leave next Tuesday for Pocassett. 

— Mr. and Mrs. R. U. Clark and fam- 
ily of Barnes road are at Crow Point, 
Mass. 

— Mr. George T. Coppins continues 
seriously ill at his home on Fair- 
mont avenue. 

- Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Howes of 
Park street are leaving today for An- 
nisquam, Mass. 

— West Newton Co-operative Bank. 
Start an account tills month. 1 to 10 
shares at $1.00 each. Advt. 

— Dr. John C. Ferguson, from China, 
will preach in the Methodist Church 
next Sunday morning. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin S. Hinck- 
ley of Park street went Wednesday to 
Megansett for the summer. 

— Mrs. William S. Spurrier of 
Church street and family have gone to 
Sagamore for the summer. 

— Mrs. and Mrs. Charles H. Peterson 
and family are spending the summer 
at Powder Point, Duxbury. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Gleason 
of Waterston road are spending the 
summer at Annisquam, Muss. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Edwin T. Fearing of 
Kendrick park are spending the sum- 
mer at Kennebunk Beach, Maine. 

— Rev. Henry H. Crane of the Meth- 
odist Church is in the West, where he 
will stay until the last of July. 

— Mr. Charles Conant has purchased 
the Soule house corner Bellevue 
street and Newtonville avenue. 

— Commander Bruce R. Ware, Jr., 
U. S. N., and Mrs. Ware are guests of 
Mr. Bruce R. Ware of Church street, 

— Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Fletcher of 
Charlesbank road are spending the 
summer at Wheeler’s Point, Glou- 
cester. 

— Miss Harriet W. Stevens of 
Church street left this morning for 
Sugar Hill, N H., where she will 
spend the summer. 

— Mr. William J. Holmes of Adams 
street is the proud possessor of the 
cane, which Charles Ward Post, G. A. 
R. awards to its oldest member. 

— Mr. Thomas J. Brown has pur- 
chased the house on Central street. 
Auburndale, and Miss Butterfield will 
occupy his present home on Mt. Ida 
terrace. 

— The wedding of Mr. .Ralph F. Bar- 
ber and Mrs. Adelaide W. Fillebrown 
of Somerville, took place last week 
Wednesday at the residence of Mr. 
and Mrs. D. Fletcher Barber on New 
tonville avenue. Rev. Henry H. Crane 
of the Methodist Church performed 
the ceremony. 



3 $ 

m 




Your stomach is Commander-in- 
chief of your reserve forces of Heulth 
and Happiness and your Appetite is 
your Stomach’s sentinel on guard. 
Our choioe meats will tempt your 
appetite and delight your digestion. 
This is the Quality and Service Shop. 

WASHINGTON PUBLIC MARKET 

211 Washington St., Newton 
Next Door to G Inter’s 
CHOICE MEAT, POULTRY and FISH 
Telephone N. N. 271(1 
Orders Delivered Twice Daily 


— Mr. Joseph Rogers of Centre street 
is spending the week end at Chatham. 

— Tho Misses Banford of Auburndale 
are spending three weeks at the Hollis. 

— Mr. Morton F. Beni of the Hollis 
left yesterday for his home in Newport, 
R. I. 

—Mr. nnd Mrs. Phillip Nichols of 
Park street have gone to Monument 
Beach. 

— Mrs. G. R. Griffin of Hunnewell 
avenue is spending the summer at 
Bath. Me, 

— Mr. and Mrs. Howard R. Mason 
of Franklin street have gone to Megan- 
sett, Mass. 

— Mrs. Prescott Warren goes - to 
Squirrel Island ,for the summer early 
next week. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Blake- 
more spent the week end at East An- 
dover. N. H. 

— Miss Martha Lathe of Vernon 
Court leaves Tuesday for a camp at 
Canton, Maine. 

— Rev. Harry Lutz and family have 
gone to Lake Megunticook, Maine, for 
the summer 

—Mr. James F. Malone graduated 
this week from Tufts college with the 
degree of A. B. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Carl Whlttemore and 
Mrs. David L. Whlttemore are also at 
Falmouth, Mass. 

—Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Follett of Park 
street are at their summer home at 
Meredith. N. H. 

— Mrs. Henry Scott, formerly of the 
Hollis has opened her house on New- 
tonville avenue. 

—Dr. Charles L. Pearson and family 
leave July 1st for the Asquam House, 
Lake Squam, N. H. 

— Mr. Frank E. Perkins of the Hollis 
is entertaining his niece, Miss Brew- 
ster of Salem, Mass. 

—Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Learnard of 
Waverley avenue are at their summer 
home at Crow Point. 

—Miss Mary E. Smith is spending 
the greater part of the summer at 
North Edgecomb, Me. 

—Mrs. Walter White of Franklin 
street left this week for her summer 
home at Pigeon Cove. 

— Mr. Charles L. Pearson, Jr., goes 
July 30th. to Camp Wildewood, Maine, 
as counsellor for the summer. 

—Miss Clara Coburn will leave on 
July 8th for her cottage at Gurnet 
Bridge, New Brunswick. Maine. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Julius Hollander and 
family of Hyde avenue are at Monu 
ment Beach for the summer. 

— Miss Martha Hitchcock of the Hol- 
lis fell this week, and broke her hip, 
and is now in the Newton Hospital. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Elmer L. Gibbs of 
Hunnewell avenue have opened their 
summer home at Megansett. Mass. 

— Dr. George F. Fair of Washington 
street has opened his summer cottage. 
“Tho Lakewood,” at Chatham. Ma 

— Mrs. Edward Melius and family of 
Cotton street have gone to their cot- 
tage at Harwicliport, for the summer. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Charles Whittemore 
are occupying their summer home, 
‘‘Corby Hall,” at Quissett, Falmouth. 
Mass. 

Newton Centre 

— Mrs. Gladys Thayer (nee Flan- 
ders) and daughter are spending a 
few days at the home of her mother, 
Mrs. W. M. Flanders of Lake terrace. 

— Mrs. Thomas A. Tolman of Boyl 
ston street has gone to visit her son 
at his home in Augusta, Me., where 
she will stay for a month. 

— The Union services begin % next 
Friday evening and Sunday morning 
and will be held at the First Baptist 
Church. 

— Mr. Albert Charlton of Cedar 
street is spending a few days with 
friends in Worcester. 

— Miss Martha Garrey of Langley 
road is spending her annual vacation 
this week with friends at Falmouth 

— Mrs. Elmer W. Davis of Crescent 
avenue is spending a few days with 
friends at Pemberton. 

— Miss Clara Bryson of Chase 
stree. has gone to Brant Rock for a 
two weeks’ vacation. 

— Miss Eva Matterson of Oxford 
road is spending a few days with 
friends at Plymouth. 

— Miss Helen Farnum who has been 
spending the past few days at Or- 
leans has returned to her home on 
Parker street. 

— Mrs. Horace Kendall and children 
of Crescent nvenue are spending a 
few days at Pemberton. 

— Mrs. Alfred K. Lee of Morton 
street has gone to Woods Hole for a 
week’s vacation. 

— Miss Ruth E. Parker of Albion 
street is spending a few days with 
friends at Washington, D. C. 

— Miss Pauline Otis has returned to 
her home on Grant avenue after 
spending a few days with friends at 
Lynn. 

— Miss Dorothy Holmes who has 
been ill at her home on Cedar street 
for the past week is able to be out. 

— Mr. C. Clarence Whittaker of Rut 
land. Vt.. i sspemling a few days 
with his brother on Institution ave 
nue. 

— Mr. E. Lincoln Bounnell of Paul 
street is enjoying a few days’ vacation 
at Pemfierton. 

— Miss Alice Putnam who has been 
enjoying a week’s vacation at Bellows 
Falls. Vt., has returned to her home 
on Elgin street. 

— Mr. Walter Marshall of Everett 
street is spending a few days with 
friends at Oak Bluffs. 

— Miss Evelyn Titus of C.ihbs street 
hns gone to Putnam, Conn., where she 
will stay for a week. 

— Miss Gladys Eaton of Ward street 
is enjoying her annual vacation at 
Annisquam. 

— Mr. John D. Wilcox who has been 
enjoying the past week at Brant Rock 
has returned to his home on Walnut 
street. 

— Among the directors of the re 
cently organized Muss. Branch of the 
League for the Preservation of Amerl 
••an Independence are Hon. George S. 
Smith of Grant avenue and Messrs 
George B. Baker, LTmis K. Liggett, 
and Andrew Adie of Chestnut Hill. 


Place Where Mother Sat Is Forever 
Sacred In the Memoi ies of Her 
Children. 

By the window In the sitting room 
stood the old chair. It was “moth- 
er’s chair” — otherwise It would hove 
been Just a choir. With mother In It, 
however, It became a shrine to which 
flocked her devoted little worshipers. 

In the rocker, as we sat on moth- 
er's knee or at her side — for the chnlr 
was generously ninde — the humped 
-'head and the bruised heart were 
healed, soys a writer In the People’s 
Home Journal. Frightened, we found 
there a safe retreat, a refuge from ev- 
ery linrm. At night the bedtime story 
was told to the rhythm of Its soothing 
swing. Joys, sorrows, all were brought 
to Its encircling arms. Mother’s choir, 
rocking, rocking, rocking by the win- 
dow. 

The old chair, we think, had a hand 
In the making of character. Maybe 
it was more effective in this service 
than we realize. Seated in It, we 
watched the needle In quick, nimble 
fingers, glinting In nnd out among the 
frayed edges tirelessly; we heard our 
childish perplexities explained over 
nnd over again, with no hint of vex- 
ation ; we snng the songs which taught 
us some of the beauty of life; we lis- 
tened to stories of bravery nnd truth. 
Industry, patience, beauty, courage, 
honesty — they can be trnced back 
through n- golden pathway straight to 
mother’s chair. 

The old chair hns seen valiant serv- 
ice. Old-fashioned, scarred nnd worn, 
it still stood in the familiar place by 
the window. Why Is It’not refinished 
— the scars smoothed out, the worn 
places covered? What! Cover the 
marks which little hands have made, 
the worn spot where mother’s tired 
head rested, the senrs made by tiny, 
restless feet? Such a question came 
from one who (lid not understand. To 
him the old chair was mere wood nnd 
paint — just a piece of furniture, not 
a shrine. * 

We do not say It aloud — our great- 
est longings are not spoken — but some- 
times when life gets tangled we find 
ourselves going ngnln to the old chair 
to have the knots untied. When grief 
comes we sob It out there. When joy 
comes we run to tell it there. When 
we fail, when we win, our thoughts 
take us to the old chair. And at night 
the little lisping prayers come beg- 
ging to he said, nnd we send them, 
along with our grown-up petitions, 
up to heaven by way of that sacred 
shrine. 


There Are Fure and Furs. 

In considering tho romance of furs 
one thinks always of the wild, free 
life of the woodland, but the common 
alley cat of the cities could tell a dif- 
ferent story. 


THAT ROCKING-CHAIR SHRINE 


Simple Resistance Units. 

To a British firm goes the credit 
for Introducing a very simple type of 
resistance unit which possesses nu- 
merous * and important advantages. 
The wire or strip member Is supported 
on a single rod passing through the 
center section of each leg of the zig- 
zagged wire or strip. Among the spe- 
cial advantages claimed are: Very 
large radiating surface for a given ca- 
pacity; small weight for n given ca- 
pacity; absolute freedom for expan- 
sion ; owing to the large surface nnd 
small bulk of metal they cool very 
quickly ; they are absolutely unaffect- 
ed by vibration nr jolts; units can be 
run red-hot without danger of sagging; 
repairs can be effected on separate 
units; tapping can he taken off any- 
where along the center clamp; the 
number of units being small compared 
with a grid resistance of equnl capac- 
ity. there are not many joints to cause 
trouble. — Scientific American. 


Congress Shoes Come Back. 

There hns been a very decided reviv- 
al of the old "congress gaiter,” with 
Its elastic Insert at the sides, which 
were very generally worn more than a 
quarter of a century ago. The explan- 
ation rests in the fact thnt American 
shof»s are now being extensively worn 
by the natives of Japan. The more 
rapid adoption of the western styles of 
lace and button shoes is made difficult 
by the native custom that requires that 
shoes be removed before a person en- 
ters a home or Inn. In some cases It 
Is even required that the shoes be re- 
moved or at least covered with cloth 
protectors before entering shops, thea- 
ters nnd similar public buildings. This 
custom 1ms led to the quite general 
adoption of the old-fashioned but con- 
venient “congress" boot by those who 
wear occidental footwear during busi- 
ness hours. 


Danger in Imported Earth. 

For a long time a great many ships 
coming from Europe Into the port of 
Now York have been dumping earth 
ballast along the shores of East river, 
Hudson river, and elsewhere around 
the bay. This Is a source of risk of 
the entry of undesirable plants and 
plant pests. In tho opinion of the Unit- 
ed States department of agriculture, 
and an Inquiry hns been started to de- 
termine the extent of this risk and to 
provide safeguards against It. There 
Is a possibility of the introduction of 
soll-infectlng diseases, injurious nema- 
todes, and hibernating insects, any of 
which, unless preventive measures 
were taken, might spread over the 
country or considerable parts of It. 


National Forest Area Reduced. 

The president on February 25, 1010, 
signed a proclamation eliminating 81,- 
770 acres from the Helena national for- 
est, Montana. The lauds affected are 
situated along the exterior boundaries 
of the forest and a large portion of the 
lands excluded are already in private 
ownership. 

This action Is based on "the recom- 
mendation made by the secretary of 
agriculture as a result of the land clas- 
sification done by the forest service. 
It was found that the lunds had prac- 
tically no value for nutionul forest 
purposes. 


ALWAYSHAS HOPE 

Prospector for Gold One of For- 
tunate Men. 


With Belief In One’s Luck to Be 

"Just Ahead” the Buffets of Fate 
Are Things at Which 
to Laugh. 

The typical prospector for gold, still 
met with In the far hills and deserts, 
may well be taken by all men ns an 
exomple nnd an Inspiration ns far as 
the blessings of staying hopes are 
concerned, says the Los Angeles 
Times. 

"Hope deferred mnketh the heart 
sick.” says the proverb. Rut it is not 
n good proverb. No matter how long 
deferred a hope may be It should 
never be abandoned. It should never 
he anything but an Inspiration nnd nn 
Incitement. 

Take this nomadic tribe of prospec- 
tors, for Instance. The typical pros- 
pector Is a man who hns spent per- 
haps the most of Ms life pursuing a 
hope thnt hns never been realized. Yet 
we never find them discouraged. We 
never know them to end their days 
in despair. No matter how many their 
years of failure may be they will tell 
you that just beyond the next chain 
of hills or in the heart of a still unex- 
plored desert the treasures they seek 
are surely awaiting them. 

A most sincere nnd persistent man 
Is the prospector. He believes In his 
quest nnd respects it. The little or 
the much thnt he wins by spasmodic 
toll he invests In his dreams. He 
braves the solitudes nnd the lonely 
wastes of the world to reach the goal 
for which he strives. Hunger, thirst 
and other hardships and sufferings he 
endures with a willing heart. 

And he never despairs. That’s the 
glory of the prospector — he never de- 
spairs. 

The average mnn, hedged In by the 
traditions of towns and cities or set- 
tled In the humdrum of the country, 
looks upon the prospector ns a queer 
nnd somewhat demented individual. 
We laugh at this strange fellow who 
Is pictured to us ns plodding along in 
the wildernesses and the sandy deso- 
Intions with his pack and his burro, 
following the will-o’-the-wisps of for- 
tune. 

But the prospector is only doing In 
his way what we are doing in ours. 
We are following each our own dream 
ns the prospector is following his. 

The only difference Is thnt we pro- 
ceed In safety nnd without ndventure. 
Otherwise we are the same ns the 
wanderer of the desert nnd the hills. 
And also we are soon discouraged and 
we are easy prey to defeat, while it Is 
death alone thnt can defeat the pros- 
pector. 

It seems to us thnt of all the- mis- 
fortunes there are in lift* — nnd heaven 
knows there nre ninny — the misfor- 
tune of hopelessness Is the worst. 
"Only for hope the heart wcfuld die,” 
said a poet. It was a true thing to 
say. 

And about this wonderful thing of 
hope there is another way to look at it 
and that is that we should always 
have at least one liepe ahead. That 
Is to say, we should always have some- 
thing that we look forward to. Then. 
If what we have in hand fails us, the 
other thing that we look forward to 
will stay us. 

Hope is something to be busy with. 
It is something of which we should 
accumulate a store. Alwnys have 
plenty of hopes nnd have them so that 
they will reach out and last away into 
the years of the future. 

There is really something mysteri- 
ous about a hope. If you will cherish 
It faithfully nnd keep It warm In your 
heart yon will he almost sure to some- 
time realize It. It is said that we are 
what we believe ourselves to be. But 
perhaps we might better say that we 
are what our hopes nre. 

Since then a long-cherished hope is 
most likely to be realized, surely It 
were foolish of us to harbor hqpes that 
will not bring us comfort and joy. 
Hope for the best there is — not great 
riches, not any material possession, 
but peace for the heart nnd a serene 
path for the white years of old uge. 


Cotton Growing in China. 

Now thnt China has decided what 
kind of cotton seed does best In that 
country, and is distributing it by the 
tou to farmers, cotton growing starts 
on a new geographical development. 
The time may yet. come when the Chi- 
nese laundrytnan, far from home, will 
croon over his collars that he is “still 
longing for the old plantation.” Work 
done during several years in four ex- 
periment stations indicates that out of 
forty varieties of seed the kind known 
as “Trice" is best suited for Chluese 
cultivation. It appears that “Trice” 
yields 141 cattles (o the moo, which Is 
the Chinese way of saying something 
more than 141 pounds per one-sixth 
of an acre, for the catty weighs about 
one-third more than the English pound. 
The Chinese pound, for that matter 
is called “kin," but for some reason 
foreigners prefer to call it a "catty." 


67,948 Animals Sent Overseas. 

In a statement made by tile war de- 
partment It appears that since the 
United States entered the war and to 
Innunry 11. 1010. this government 

shipped overseas from this country 
67.04S animals, which Included 5.480 
cavalry horses. 88.300 draft horses, 28, 
088 draft mules, and 075 pack mules. 
The total number of animals lost on 
route overseas so far reported is tUH) 
horses and mules, or less than 1 per 
-eat or the totul number of uuimuls 
•hipped. 



9 

Posters for 59,000 Schoolrooms 


(Photo by International Film Service Inc.) 


From the great cities of the coasts 
to the farthermost, isolated sections 
of the backwoods, the schoolhouses of 
New England are being decorated 
with the “Stamp, Stamp, Stamp" 
poster of the War Savings Stamp 
Committee of New England. It was 
intended strictly and exclusively for 
the children, but so many requests for 
it are coming in to the Boston head- 
quarters it is clear that the grown 
folk appreciate it quite as much as 
the youngsters. 

The poster is such a jolly affair you 
would know just to look at it that 
whoever designed it was full of fun. 
You are not at all surprised to learn 
that the smiles are chasing each other 
over her face most of thq time. There 
are hardly two minutes together when 
either they are not doing that or one 
is not lurking about ready to break 
through^ Miss Dorothy Clogston Is 
the artist, and she graduated from 
the High School of Practical Arts in 
Boston last June. She made the poster 
for a war poster contest at the school 
last year and left it behind her when 
she went away. 

It was there that it was found by 
the War Savings Committee of New 
England on the last day of school be- 
fore the Christmas vacation, and it 
was immediately carried off to head- 
quarters. The next question was 
where to find the young artist, for she 
had disappeared in one of the thou- 
sands of offices that go to make up a 
big city. The master of the school 
and *he head of the department were 
appealed to, and they ran Dorothy 
down, as it were, to an office not far 
from the War Savings Stamps head- 
quarters. Everybody in that office 
was almost as excited as Dorothy was 
when the news went abroad that the 
War Savings Committee wanted Dor- 
othy’s poster, and her employers were 
willing enough to grant her leave of 
absence while she made a few 
changes necessary from a commer- 
cial standpoint and to bring the idea 
up to date. 


Miss Dorothy insists that it is a 
serious poster. She had a serious 
subject and she wanted to present it 
so seriously that after people looked 
at the poster they would go and buy 
War Savings Stamps, sh? said, and 
pointed to the sailor boy with his de- 
termined way and important air, as 
proof that she had accomplished what 
she wished. * 

She doesn’t know why she drew the 
poster Just the way she did. Miss 
Dorothy says, the lines just seemed 
to come. She does do naturalistic 
things, she add3, but when she draws 
the way she likes to she draws like 
that. Last summer Doro.hy was a 
farmerette at Concord , nnd has 
signed up for next summer also. 
When the harvests are over in the 
autumn she is going to some art 
school and there specialize in the 
work that has already brought her a 
certain amount of fame. 


EVERYONE’S EFFORT COUNTS. 


Although the fighting is ended, the 
support of everyone is needed by the 
United States government to meet its 
war obligations, to maintain its troops 
in comfort abroad, to bring them back 
home, and to discharge all promises 
made to every soldier and to his de- 
i pendents. Moreover, the purchase of 
government securities by millions of 
1 people, instead of a few, makes these 
millions actually financial partners in 
the government. It is a privilege of 
| the individual — in fact, it is the essence 
of real democratic government. A 
person who is partner of Uncle Sam is 
i more interested in ihe government's 
doings and is less open to insidious 
, suggestion than one who has no per- 
sonal stake in his country. War Sav- 
| ings Stamps are very practical promo- 
ters of Americanization, make better 
Americans of our native born, and 
make permanent Americans of our for- 
, **iim-born element. Everyone’s effort 
and every one’s savings and everyone’s 
War Savings Stamps count. 


PSYCHOLOGY AND THE 
FAMILY MENU. 


How a Farmer’s Wife Reduces 
Meat Consumption Secretly. 


A bright farm housewife, who man- 
ages to buy at least one War Savings 
Stamp a week, tells how she does it 
by inducing her family to especially 
like what she prepares for them. She 
does not tell them they cannot afford 
fresh meat at present prices — to do. so 
would only whet their appetite for it. 
They do not even realize that she is 
not buying as much meat as ever. 

She has cut down the quantity con- 
sumed by substituting other appetiz- 
ing things and makes the meat she 
uses go farther by serving less ax- 
pensive things with it. Scalloped po- 
tatoes and other vegetables are popu- 
lar with the family, vegetable salads 
with cream mayonnaise never go beg- 
ging. and fried or grilled apples are 
"tasty” with veal or pork. This wo- 
man's lardor is well supplied with 
green vegetables preserved by the cold 
pack process. 

Polenta is a favorite dish — mush 
flavored with cheese and onions, fried 
crisp or served cold in slices. Maca- 
roni with peanut butter or tomato 
sauce or fried onions means two or 
three helpings all around, she claims. 
Vegetable stew, with dumplings or 
toast strips, she rnukes so appealing 
that the children prefer it to meat 
dishes. Dainty biscuits or buttered 
toast, with preserved fruit and milk 
or cocoa, solves the supper problem 
for them. 

Even farmerfolk have to go lighter 
thau usual on butter aud eggs, -but 
occasional omelettes, plaiu or baked, 
find their way to this woman’s table. 
She tries to make everything especial- 
ly delicious, aud resorts occasionally 
to psychology, remarking casually 
that some favorite dish will be served 
us soon as she fiuds time to prepare 
It, a plun which works like magic. 
She says her family is better nour- 
ished than ever, aud by her clever 
management she buys many War Sav- 
ings Stamps. 


RECREATION AND ACCUMU- 
LATION. 


Do iuv^st your small savings in 
Thrift Stamps, War Suvtugs Stamps, 
Liberty Uouds and other safe Invest- 
ments. 


To Save Systematically is Not to 
Eliminate a^I Joy of Living. 

We are all saving— it Is the fashion; 
but truth compels the statement that 
many of us do not know how to do it 
without feeling that we are missing 
something. We make wonderful re- 
solves to sacrifice this, that or the 
other indulgence, to buy Thrift or 
War Savings Stamps. 

Heroically we resolve to eliminate 
something we have enjoyed or been 
benefited by. as if that were the only 
thing to do. It may be that the 
“movies" have been abandoned by 
some one who had found in them a 
change of thought when weary. For 
a period of weeks they have been ta- 
booed. and the Thrift Stamps have 
accumulated merrily, but the saver 
experiences a tension and strain with- 
out the customary relaxation. 

Some day realization comes, reac-. 
tion follows, and then — farewell to 
thrift. Instead of wholly cutting out 
either the favorite amusement or 
thrift, why not balance things a little 
more evenly, divide the income into 
proportions --fhod. shelter, 
clothing, recreation, improvement, 
charity, savings, etc. 

The possession of money for itself 
is uot an incentive to one who would 
get the best from life, but it should be 
impressed upon every child that sav- 
ing will bring the best thiugs in the 
years to come, therefore thrirt is uec- 
essarv. Muuy wonderful opportuni- 
ties have been missed becuuse of lack 
of financial ability to take advantage 
of them. 

Once the thrift habit is formed, op- 
portunities appear. Trices vary, and 
u few ceuts saved here and there may 
bo added to oue's store without alter* 
ing the conditions of a budget. The 
possibilities of left-overs aud make- 
overs are unlimited when thrift be- 
comes a habit. By saving systemati- 
cally and spending wisely, one may eu- 
Joy life to the utmost. The possession 
of a goodly uumt -* War Savlugs 
Stamps will ulso add materially to 
peace of mind and buoyancy of spirits. 

War-Saving Stamps hold your mon- 
ey for opportunity's coll. 





10 


THE NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1910. 


City of Newton 



City Collector's Notice 


Cit.y of Newton, June 27, 1919. 

The owners and occupants of the 
following described parcels of real 
estate situated in the City of Newton, 
in the County of Middlesex and Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, and the 
public are hereby notified that the 
taxes thereon severally assessed for 
the year 1918. unless otherwise speci- 
fied. according to the list committed 
to me as collector of taxes for said 
Newton by the Assessors of Tnxes, 
remain unpaid, and that the smallest 
undivided part of said land sufficient 
to satisfy said taxes, with interest 
and all legal costs and charges, or 
the whole of said land if no person 
offers to take an undivided part 
thereof, will be offered for sale by 
public auction at the City Hall, in 
said Newton, on 

Tuesday, July 22, 1919 

At 10 o'clock A. M. 

for the payment of said taxes with 
interest, costs and charges thereon, 
unless the same shall be previously 
discharged. 

WARD 1, PRECINCT 1 

Mary Rossi. About 20,000 square feet 
of land and building, bounded north- 
easterly by Ferrer street, south- 
easterly by land now or late of Rossi, 
southwesterly by Adams street, north- 
westerly by land now or late of Rossi, 
being section 12, block 4C, lot (1)- 
A-B-C-D of Assessors’ Plans. $54.52 
The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About 5.000 square feet 
of land, bounded northeasterly by 
Ferrer street, southeasterly, * south- 
westerly and northwesterly by land 
now or late of Rossi, being section 12. 
block 4C. lot (l)-ll of Assessors’ 
Plans. $3.6S 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About 5,000 square feet 
of land, bounded northeasterly by Fer- 
rer street, southeasterly, southwester- 
ly and northwesterly by land now or 
late of Rossi, being section 12, block 
4C, lot ( 1 ) -9 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$3.68 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About 5,279 square feet 
of land, bounded northeasterly by Fer- 
rer street, southeasterly by Laundry 
brook, southwesterly and northwester- 
ly by Ferrer street, being section 12, 
block 4C, lot ( 1 ) -7 of Assessors’ Plans. 
The above lot is Registered Land. 

$4.60 

Mary Rossi. About 7,687 square 
feet of land, bounded northwesterly 
and northeasterly by land now or late 
of Rossi, southeasterly by Laundry 
brook, southwesterly by Adams street, 
being section 12, block 4C. lot ( 1 ) -6 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $15.96 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About 5000 square feet 
of land, bounded northwesterly, north- 
easterly and southeasterly by land 
now- or late of Rossi, southwesterly by 
Adams street, being section 12, block 
4C, lot ( 1 ) -8 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$ 8.86 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About 5000 square feet 
of land, bounded northwesterly, north- 
easterly and southeasterly by land 
now or late of Rossi, southwesterly by 
Adams street, being section 12, block 
4C, lot (1)-10 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$ 8.86 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About 5037 square feet 
of land, bounded northeasterly and 
southeasterly by land now or late of 
Rossi, southwesterly by Adams street, 
northwesterly by land now or late of 
Hayes, being section 12. block 4C. lot 
(1)-13 of Assessors’ Plans. $7.02 
The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About 3934 square feet 
of land, bounded northerly by land 
now or late of Flanagan and City of 
Newton, easterly by Laundry brook, 
southerly and westerly by land now' or 
late of Rossi, being section 12, block 
4C, lot (l)-22 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$3.68 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About 3295 square feet 
of land, bounded easterly by Laundry 
brook, southwesterly and northerly by 
land now' or late of Rossi, being sec- 
tion 12. block 4C, lot (1)-21 of Asses- 
sors’ Plans. $3.68 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About' 6161 square feet 
of land, bounded northwesterly and 
northeasterly by land now or late of 
Rossi, southeasterly by Laundry brook, 
southwesterly by Ferrer street, being 
section 12. block 4C, lot ( 1 ) -19 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $4.60 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About 4176 square 
feet of land, bounded northwesterly, 
northeasterly and southeasterly by 
land now or late of Rossi, southwester- 
ly by Ferrer street, being section 12. 
block 4C, lot (1)-18 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$3.68 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About 5555 square feet 
of laud, bounded northwesterly, north- 
easterly, easterly and southeasterly by 
land now or late of Rossi, southwester- 
lv by Ferrer street, being section 12, 
block 4C, lot (1)-17 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$3.68 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About 5536 square feet 
of land, and building, bounded north- 
westerly by land now or late of Rossi, I 
northeasterly by land now or late of J 
Flanagan, southeasterly by land now 
or late of Rossi, southwesterly by Fer- 
rer street, being section 12, block 4C, 
lot (1)-16 of Assessors’ Plans. $7.36 
Tiie above lot is Registered Land. 
Marv Rossi. About 5524 square feet 
of lund. bounded northeasterly by land 
now or late of Flanagan, southeasterly 
by land now or late of Rossi, south- 
westerly by Ferrer street, northwester- 
ly by lund now or lute of DeLuco, be- 
ing section 12, block 4C, lot ( 1 ) -15 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $3.68 

The ubove lot is Registered Lund. 
Mary Rossi. About 5097 square feet 
of lund, bounded northeasterly by Fer- 
rer street, southeasterly and south- 
westerly by land now or late of Rossi, 
northwesterly by lund now or late of 
DeLuco. being section 12. block 4C. 
lot (1)14 of Assessors' Plans. $3.68 
The ubove lot is Registered Land. 


Mary Rossi. About 2 acres. 20,880 
square feet of land, bounded south- 
westerly by Adams street, northwester- 
ly by land now or late of Hayes 
and DeLuco, northerly and northeast- 
ly by land now’ or late of Flanagan, 
easterly and southeasterly by land 
now or late of City of Newton, being 
section 12, block 4A. lot 2 of Assessors’ 
Plans. Duplicate Betterment Appor- 
tionment and Interest thereon. $10.36 
The above lot is Registered Land. 
Nicola and Arcangiola Zeolla. About 
6012 square feet of land, and build- 
ing, bounded northeasterly by land 
now or late of Sajiro. southeasterly by 
land now or late of Farrell, southwest- 
erly by Chapel street, northwesterly by 
land now or late of McNamara, being 
section 12. block 1. lot 21 of Assessors' 
Plans. Bal. $24.92 

John H. Clifford. About 8430 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by Cali- 
fornia street, easterly by land now’ or 
late, of Champagne and Morris, south- 
erly by land now or late of Burns, 
westerly by land now or late of Trudo 
and Fisher, being section 11, block 7. 
lot 2 of Assessors’ Plans. $17.69 

Johanna Dolan, City of Newton Tax 
Title, supposed present ow’ner Grace 
Caruso. About 680 square feet of land, 
bounded northerly by land now or late 
of Sheridan, southeasterly by towm of 
Watertown boundary line, westerly by 
land now’ or late of Roman Catholic 
Archbishop of Boston, being section 11, 
block 12. lot 17 of Assesors’ Plans. 

$.92 

Charles A. Glover. About 9522 
square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northerly by land now’ or late 
of Veno, easterly by Dalbv street, 
southerly by land now or late of City 
of Newton, westerly by land now or 
late of Devlin, being section 11. block 
6. lot 7 of Assessors’ Plans. $58.28 
Edward O. Howard. About 16.010 
square feet of land, bounded northeast- 
erly by land now or late of Sbordone. 
Tedesco, and Forknall. southeasterly 
by land now or late of McNamara, 
southwesterly by Chapel street, north- 
westerly by land now or late of Fork- 
nall, being section 12, block 1, lot 23 
of Assessors’ Plans. $14.72 

The above lot is Registered Land. 

WARD 1, PRECINCT 2. 

Lillian G. Budding. About 4514 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by land now or late 
of Fredey, easterly by land qx>w or late 
of Dw-yer. southerly by Washington 
street, westerly by land now or late of 
Powers, being section 13. block 7, lot 
7A of Assessors’ Plans. $139.50 

Thomas Leo Dwyer and Ruth M. 
Dwyer. About 7773 square feet of land 
and building, bounded northerly by 
land now’ or late of Aucoin. easterly 
by Tbornton street, southerly by 
Washington street, westerly by land 
now or late of Bent, being section 13, 
block 6, lot 11 and 11A of Assessors’ 
Plans. $511.04 

Mary Elizabeth Grant. About 7200 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by Boyd street, 
easterly by land now or late of Trum- 
ble, southerly by land now or late of 
McDonald, westerly by land now or 
late of Hopkinson. being section 12, 
block 8. lot 2 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$57.72 

Catherine B. Munro. About 2900 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by land now’ or late 
of Deutschle, easterly by land now or 
late of Ela, southerly by land now or 
late of Wilson, westerly by Oakland 
street, being section 14, block 7, lot 7 
of Assessors’ Plans. $42.44 

Horace W. Orr. Supposed present 
owner Harry P. Chadw’ick. About 
14,047 square feet of land, bounded 
northerly, easterly and southerly by 
land now’ or late of Morrell, westerly 
by East Side Parkway being section 
15, block 5, lot 14 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$23.24 

Mary Rossi. About 6638 square feet 
of land, bounded northeasterly by land 
now or late of Dorsey, southeasterly 
by Jackson road, southwesterly and 

northwesterly by land now or late of 
Rossi, being section 12, block 4B, lot 
( 1 ) -2 of Assesors’ Plans. $11.05 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About 5736 square feet 
of land, bounded northwesterly and 

northeasterly by laud now or late of 
Rossi, southeasterly by Jackson road, 
southwesterly by Adams street, being 
section 12, block 4B, lot ( 1) -3 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $15.15 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About 5287 square feet 
of land, bounded northeasterly and 

southeasterly by land now or late of 
Rossi, southwesterly by Adams street, 
northwesterly by Laundry Brook, be- 
ing section 12, block 4B, lot (l)-5 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $13.14 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary Rossi. About 5210 square feet 
of land, bounded northeasterly by 

Ferrer street, southeasterly by land 
now or late of Dorsey and Rossi, 
southwesterly by land now’ or late 
of Rossi, northwesterly by Laum 
dry Brook, being section 12, block 4B, 
lot ( 1 > -4 of Assessors’ Plans. $5.52 
The above lot is Registered Land'. 
Mary Rossi. About 6834 square feet 
of land, bounded northerly by land 

now or late of Rossi, easterly by Jack- 
son road, southwesterly by Ferrer 
street, northwesterly by Laundry 
Brook, being section 12, block 4D, lot 
(l)-20 of Assessors’ Plans. $18.30 
The above lot is Registered Lund. 
Mary Rossi. About 550 square feet 
of land, bounded easterly by Jackson 
road, southerly by land now or late 
of Rossi, northwesterly by Laundry 
Brook, being section 12, block 41). lot 
( 1 ) -21 A of Assessors’ Plans. $2.42 
• The above lot is Registered Land. 

Mary Rossi. About 40,200 square 
feet of land, bounded southerly and 
southwesterly by Adams street, north- 
westerly by land now or late of City 
of Newton, easterly and northeasterly | 
by Juckson road, southeasterly by 
Juckson road and Washington street, 
being section 12, block 4B, lot L of 
Assessors’ Plans. Duplicate Better- 
ment Apportionment and Interest 
thereon. $4.44 

The above lot is Registered Lund. 
Antoinettu Rufo. Supposed present 
owner Ida M. Hodsdon. About 9435 
square feet of lund und building, 
bounded northerly by land now or lute 
of Juques und Becker, eusterly by 
Salisbury road, southerly by laud now 
or late of Davis, westerly by land now 
or lute of Campbell, being suction 15, 
block 5, lot 3 of Assesors' Pluns. 

$88.67 


I^aura Davy Sibley. About 14.400 
square foet of land and building, 
bounded, northerly by Bennington 
street, easterly and southerly by land 
now or late of Litchfield, westerly by 
land now or late of Riley, being sec- 
tion 14, block 10, lot 5, of Assessors’ 
PJIans. $88.80 

Peter A. Tevnan. About 2673 square 
feet of land and building, bounded 
northerly by land now or late of Smith, 
easterly by land now or late of Wood- 
ward, southerly by Wlnthrop avenue, 
westerly by land now’ or late of 
Guthrie, being section 14, block 4. lot 
10 of Assessors’ Plans. $20.24 

Harriet H. Waterman About 10,- 
348 square feet of land, bounded 
northwesterly, northeasterly and south- 
easterly by land now or late of Water- 
man. southwesterly by Fairmont ave- 
nue. being section 15, block 1, lot 8A 
of Assessors’ Plans. $32.88 

WARD 2, PRECINCT 1 

John V. Cavanaugh. About 4500 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by Court street, 
easterly by land now’ or late of Ford, 
southerly by land now’ or late of Lam- 
ond, westerly by land now’ or late of 
Claflin. being section 22, block 22. lot 
9 of Assessors’ Plans. $47.47 

Mary E. Hyde. Supposed present 
owner Harriet C. Dennis. About 8160 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by land now’ or late of Washburn. 
Waugh. Claflin, Cavanaugh. Ford. Lyon 
and Moorhead, easterly by Court street, 
southerly by land now or late of Far- 
well. westerly by land now or late of 
Beecher, being section 22, block 22, 
lot 12A of Assessors' Plans. $9.95 
Arthur L. Stanek. Supposed present 
owner Waltham Co-operative Bank. 
About 5000 square feet of land, bound- 
ed northeasterly by Woodrow’ avenue, 
southeasterly by land now or late of 
McMahon, southwesterly by land now 
or late of Tenney, northwesterly by 
land now or late of Fox and Currier, 
being section 21. block 2. lot 34 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $5.52 

Elizabeth F. Strout. Dev. About 
6531 square feet of land and building, 
hounded northerly by land now or late 
of Burns, easterly by Lowell avenue, 
southerly by land now or late of John- 
son, westerly by land now or late of 
Savage, being section 22, block 5A, 
lot 37 of Assessors’ Plans. $62.46 

Aaron Adelman. About 5508 square 
feet of land, bounded northeasterly by 
Colonial avenue, southeasterly, south- 
westerly and northwesterly by land 
now or late of Adelman. being section 
21. block 3A, lot 78 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $2.76 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Aaron Adelman. Supposed present 
owner Carrie M. Dillingham. About 
4829 square feet of land, bounded 
northwesterly, northeasterly and 
southeasterly by land now or late of 
Adelman, southwesterly by Colonial 
avenue, being section 21. block 3B. lot 
92 of Assesors’ Plans. $2.76 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Aaron Adelman. About 7012 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
Parkway road, easterly and north- 
easterly by land now or late of Par- 
ker. southeasterly by California street, 
southwesterly by land now or late of 
Gibson, westerly by land now or late 
of Adelman, being section 21. block 
4H, lot 100 of Assessors’ Plans. $8.86 
Aaron Adelman. About 5684 square 
feet of land, bounded northeasterly 
by land now or late of Gibson, south- 
easterly by California street, south- 
westerly. northwesterly and northerly 
by land now or late of Adelman, being 
section 21, block 4H, lot 98 of Asses- 
sors’ Plans. $7.94 

The Foster Realty Co. About 16090 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by land now or late of Higgins, east- 
erly by land now or late of Higgins 
and Sampson, southerly by Washing- 
ton street, westerly by land now or 
late of The Foster Realty Co., being 
section 22, block 5, lot 3 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $68.39 

The Foster Realty Co. About 18230 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
erly by land now or late of Higgins, 
easterly by land now or late of The 
Foster Realty Co., southerly by Wash- 
ington street, westerly by Walker 
street, being section 22, block 5, lot 4 
of Assessors’ Plans. $82.15 

Catherine A. Girtzig. 5000 square 
feet of land, bounded northeasterly by 
Adams street, southeasterly by land 
now or late of Barnes, southwesterly 
by land now or late of Hendry, north- 
westerly by land now or late of 
Waugh, being section 21, block 3. lot 
55 of Assessors’ Plans. $3.68 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
John MacDonald. About 3991 

square feet of land and building, 
bounded northeasterly by Crafts 
street, southeasterly by land now or 
late of MacDonald, southwesterly by 
land now or late of Cabot, northwest- 
erly by land now or late of Rowell, 
being section 21, block 10, lot (1)-D 
of Assessors’ Plans. $53.26 

John MacDonald. About 5683 

square feet of land and building, 
bounded northeasterly by Crafts 
street, southeasterly by land now or 
late of MacDonald, southwesterly by 
land now or late of Cabot, northwest- 
erly by land now or late of MacDon- 
ald. being section 21, block 10. lot 
(1)-C of Assessors’ Plans. $80.92 

John MacDonald. About 10116 

square feet of land, bounded north- 

easterly by Crafts street, southeast- 
erly by Watertown street, southwest- 
erly and northwesterly by land now 
or late of MacDonald, being section 
21, block 10, lot (1)-A of Assessors' 
Plans. $51.94 

John MacDonald. About 8218 square 
feet of land and building, bounded 
southeasterly by Watertown street, 
southwesterly by land now or late of 
Cabot, northwesterly and northeaster- 
i ly by land now or late of MacDonald, 
being section 21, block 10, lot (1)-B 
of Assessors’ Plans. $86.59 

WARD 2, PRECINCT 2 

John T. Burns. About 2600 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
land now or late of Allen, southeast- 
erly by Upland road, southwesterly 
by Pheasant road, being section 23,. 
block 13F, lot 6 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$138.84 

Llewellyn E. Huston. About 3600 
square feet of laud, bounded north- 
erly by land now or late of lluston, 
easterly by land now or late of Pond, 
southerly by land now or late of Trot- 
ter, westerly by Bridges avenue; being 
section 23, block 3, lot 31 of Asses- 
sors' Plans. $1.84 


Llewellyn E. Huston. About 3600 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by land now or late of Schultz and 
Rooney, easterly by land now or late 
of Chapin, southerly by land now or 
late of Huston, westerly by Bridges 
avenue, being ‘Section 23, block 3, lot 
30 of Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

Frances A. Keyes. About 9763 square 
feet of land anil building, bounded 
northerly by land now or late of Rol- 
lins and Strout. easterly by Walnut 
place, southerly by land now or late 
of Wood, westerly by land now or late 
Cole and Tainter. being section 26, 
block 4, lot 2 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$92.12 

Michael McMullen. Supposed pres- 
ent owner Michael and S. Lillian Mc- 
Mullen. About 7166 square feet of 
land and building, bounded northerly 
by land now or late of Bryan, east- 
erly by Morton street, southerly by 
land now or late of Jordan, westerly 
by land now or late of Roys and Trot- 
ter, being section 23, block 18, lot 2 
of Assessors’ Plans. $85.00 

Matthew J. Sheridan. About 10,058 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by Norwood ave- 
nue, easterly by Bridges avenue, 
southerly by land now or late of Fla- 
herty, westerly by land now or late 
of Sheridan, being section 23, block 
3A, lot 5 of Assessors’ Plans. $46.00 
Walter Braxton. About 3817 square 
feet of land and building, bounded 
northerly by land now or late of 
Hardy, easterly by land now or late 
of Pillion, southerly by land now or 
late of Maguire, westerly by Munroe 
street, being section 23, block 2. lot 
.29 of Assessors’ Plans. $13.09 

William Henry Harris.’ About 8520 
square feet of land, bounded easterly 
by Walnut street, southerly and west- 
erly by land now or late of Harris, 
northwesterly by Lakeview avenue, 
being section 24, block 1, lot 1 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $41.64 

William Henry Harris. About 7720 
square feet of land, bounded easterly 
by Walnut street, southerly, westerly 
and northerly by land now or late of 
Harris, being section 24, block 1, lot 
2 of Assessors’ Plans. $38.90 

William Henry Harris. About 8450 
square feet of land, bounded easterly 
by Walnut street, southerly by Com- 
monwealth avenue, westerly and 
northerly by land now or late of Har- 
ris, being section 24, block 1, lot 3 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $50.92 

William Henry Harris. About 6370 
square feet of land, bounded easterly, 
southerly and westerly by land now 
or late of Harris, northwesterly by 
Lakeview avenue, being section 24, 
block 1, lot 4 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$25.76 

William Henry Harris. About 8040 
square feet of land, bounded southerly 
by Commonwealth avenue, westerly, 
northerly and easterly by land now or 
late of Harris, being section 24, block 

I, lot 5 of Assessors’ Plans. $39.20 
William Henry Harris. About 

II, 360 square feet of land, bounded 

northwesterly by Lakeview avenue, 
easterly by land now or late of Harris, 
southerly by Commonwealth avenue, 
westerly by land now or late of Sweet, 
being section 24, block 1, lot 6 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $39.20 

George Clarendon Hodges. About 
15650 square feet of land and build- 
ing, bounded northerly by Austin 
street, easterly by land now or late of 
Hodges, southerly by land now or late 
of Woodward, westerly by Allston 
street, being section 25, block 7, lot 
4 of Assessors’ Plans. $142.92 

George Clarendon Hodges. About 
28,728 square feet of land, bounded 
northerly by Austin street, easterly 
by land now or late of Allen, south- 
easterly by Mt. Vernon street, west- 
erly by land now or late of Woodward 
and Hodges, being section 25, block 7. 
lot 4A of Assessors’ Plans. $71.17 
Henry Bigelow Williams Dev. About 
7890 square feet of land, bounded 
northerly, easterly and southerly by 
land now or late of Williams, westerly 
by Ixjwell avenue, being section 24, 
block 2, lot (7) -47 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$11.00 

Henry Bigelow Williams Dev. About 
7020 square feet of land, bounded 
northerly, easterly and southerly by 
land now or late of Williams, west- 
erly by Lowell avenue, being section 
24, block 2, Jot (7) -46 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $11.00 

Henry Bigelow Williams Dev. About 
7180 square feet of land, bounded 
northerly by land now or late of 
Sweet, easterly by land now or late 
of Williams, southerly by land now or 
late of Murray, westerly by Lowell 
avenue, being section 24, block 2, lot 
(7) -35 of Assessors’ Plans. $14.68 

WARD 2, PRECINCT 3 
Antonio Anneso. About 3987 square 
feet of land and building, bounded 
northeasterly by land now or late of 
Napolitano, southeasterly by land now 
or late of Del Grosso, southwesterly 
by Hawthorn street, northwesterly by 
land now or late of Anneso, being sec- 
tion 20, block 10F, lot (lA)-47 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $26.38 

John Bibbo. About 5500 square feet 
of land und building, bounded north- 
easterly by Chapel street, southeast- 
erly by land now or late of McCor- 
mick, southwesterly by land now or 
late of Whelan, northwesterly by land 
now or late of Nute, being section 20, 
block 3, lot 22 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$46.92 

Michael Cavanaugh. About 9042 
square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northeasterly by West street, 
southeasterly by Middle street, south- 
easterly and northeasterly by land 
now or late of Cavanaugh, southwest- 
erly by land now or late of Sweeney 
and Desimone, northwesterly by land 
now or lute of Muscia, being section 
20, block 4, lot 39 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$110.17 

Gulseppe Colletti, Antonio Magni, 
Antonette Magni. Supposed present 
owner George A. Richards. About 
2042 square feet of lund und building, 
bounded northeasterly by land now 
or late of Salvucci, southeasterly by 
Murphy court, southwesterly by land 
now or late of Colletti, northwesterly 
by lund now or late of D’Angelo, be- 
ing section 20, block 10F, lot (1A)-41A 
of Assessors’ Plans. Bal. $18.48 

Michael C. Napolitano and Clemente 
Iodice. About 25,567 square feet of 
land and buildings, bounded north- 
easterly by Adams street, south- 
easterly by land now or late of Es- 
posito, southwesterly by land now or 
late of Del Grosso and. Anneso, north- 
westerly by land now or late of Feu- 
gan, northeasterly and northwesterly 
by land now or Into of Mazzolu, being 


soctlon 20, block 10F, lot 17 of Asses- 
sors’ Plans. Bal. $50.69 

Emeline A. Newcomb. About 20,000 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northeasterly by Ashmont 
avenue and land now or late of Nolan, 
southeasterly by land now or late of 
Foley and Malloy, southwesterly by 
land now or late of Lothrop and Ash- 
mont avenue, northwesterly by land 
now or late of Judkins, being section 
20, block 10A, lot 1 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $36.80 

Julius Pass. About 10,913 square 
feet of land and* buildings, bounded 
northeasterly by land now or late of 
Shrier and Delaney, southeasterly by 
Middle street, southwesterly by West 
street, northwesterly by land now or 
late of Fall, being section 20, block 
2, lot 10 of Assessors’ Plans. 

Bal. $82.33 

Nellie T. Barry. About 30,459 
square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northeasterly and southeast- 
erly by land now or late of Brackett, 
southwesterly by Crafts street, north- 
westerly by land now or late of Dona- 
hue, being section 20, block 5, lot 9 
of Assessors’ Plans. $147.02 

William H. Kenah. About 5500 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by Chapel street, southeast- 
erly by land now or late of Nute, 
southwesterly by land now or late of 
Antonelli, northwesterly by land now 
or late of Collins, being section 20, 
block 3, lot 20 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$7.36 

WARD 3, PRECINCT 1 

Charles I. Bucknam. About 20,000 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by Cheese Cake 
brook, easterly by Kempton place, 
southerly by land now or late of Fur- 
bush, westerly by land now or late of 
Hussey, Hunt and Bucknam, being 
section 30, block 7, lot 8 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $414.63 

Gertrude A. Dolan. About 8680 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by land now or 
late of Fiske, easterly by land now or 
late of Roche and Nelson, southerly 
by River street, westerly by land now 
or late of Cain, being section 32, 
block 4, lot 8 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$48.52 

Timothy F. Fahey. About 21,450 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by Adams street, 
easterly by land now or late of Cate, 
southerly by William street and land 
now or late of Mague, westerly by 
Tolman street, being section 33, 
block 2, lot 18 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$51.52 

Amy H. Greenwood. About 6750 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northeasterly, southeasterly 
and southwesterly by land now or late 
of Matteson, southeasterly by land 
now or late of Nordheim, southwesterly 
by Harding street, northwesterly by 
land now or late of Chase, being sec- 
tion 31, block 8, lot 167 and 168 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. Bal. $39.36 

Mary L. Kent. About 5300 square 
feet of land and building, bounded 
northwesterly and northerly by land 
now or late of Hession, easterly by 
Oak avenue, southerly by land now or 
late of Eaton, westerly by land now 
or late of Gammons, being section 34, 
block 7, lot 32 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$55.44 

Middlesex & Boston Street Railway 
Company. About 29,760 square feet of 
land and building, bounded northerly 
by Gerard court, easterly by land now 
or late of Gammons, Moynihan and 
Batstone, southerly by Washington 
street, westerly by Armory street, be- 
ing section 30, block 7A, lot 3 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $245.20 

Middlesex & Boston Street Railway 
Company. About 25,009 square feet of 
land and building, bounded northerly 
by Cheese Cake brook, easterly by 
Armory street, southerly by land now 
or late of Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, westerly by land now or late 
of Clark, being section 30, block 7, 
lot 1 of Assessors’ Plans. $107.08 
Annie Walsh. About 43,640 square 
feet of land and building, bounded 
northeasterly by land now or late of 
Troy, southeasterly by land now or 
late of MacNee and Kilroy, southwest- 
erly by land now or late of Condrin 
and Troy, northwesterly by Smith ave- 
nue. being section 33, block 1C, lot 30 
of Assessors’ Plans. $70.33 

Margaret I. Barnicle. Supposed 
present owner Marion E. Burns. About 
455 square feet of land, bounded east- 
erly by land now or late of Thomas, 
southerly by Laurel street, northwest- 
erly by the City of Waltham boundary 
line, being section 33, block 8, lot 5 
of Assessors’ Plans. $.92 

Walter Brodrick. About 7360 square 
feet of land, bounded northeasterly by 
land now or late of Wilbur, southeast- 
erly by Harding street, southwesterly 
by Taft avenue, northwesterly- by land 
now or late of Fiola, being section 31, 
block 9, lot 81-82-83 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $6.44 

Boyd A. Dakin. About 3394 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
Underwood avenue, easterly by land 
now or late of Robbins, southerly by 
land now or late of Smith, westerly by 
land now or “late of Haskell, being sec- 
tion 33, block 3B, lot 11 of Assessors’ 
Plans. „ $3.68 

The above lot is Registered Land. 
Mary C. Forbes. About 2 acres, 
37,950 square feet of land, bounded 
northeasterly by Harding street, 
southeasterly by Reservation for a 
drain, southwesterly by land now or 
late of Perkins, Weir, Ilazelhurst ave- 
nue and land now or late of Wilbur, 
northw'esterly by land now or late of 
Reynolds, being section 31, block 12, 
lot 1 of Assessors’ Plans. $18.40 
Clyde L. Fraser. Supposed present 
owner Harry P. Chadwick. About 
3200 square feet of land, bounded 
northerly by land now or late of 
Herlihy, easterly by Wildwood avenue, 
southerly by land now or late of 
Boyd, westerly by land now or late 
of Randall, being section 31, block 4A, 
lot 22 of Assessors’ Pluns. $5.80 

Clyde L. Fraser. Supposed present 
owner Harry P. Chadwick. Abbut 
3200 squure feet of land, bounded 
northerly by land now or late of Boyd, 
easterly by Wildwood avenue, south- 
erly by land now or late of Boyd, 
westerly by land now or late of Run- 
dall. being section 31, block 4A, lot 
23 of Assessors’ Plans. $4.60 

Clyde L. Fraser. Supposed present 
owner Harry P. Chadwick. About 3200 
square foet of lund, bounded norther- 
ly by land now or late of Boyd, east- 
erly by Wildwood avenue, southerly 
by lund now or lute of Boyd, westorly 


by land now or late of Randall, being 

section 31, block 4A, lot 24 of Asses- 
sors’ Plans. $4.60 

Clyde L. Fraser. Supposed present 
owner Harry P. Chadwick. About 
3200 square feet of land, bounded 
northerly by lnnd now or late of 
Boyd, easterly by Wildwood avenue, 
southerly by land now or late of 
Boyd, westerly by lnnd now or late of 
Randall, being section 31, block 4A 
lot 25 of Assessors’ Plans. $4.60 

Clyde L. Fraser. Supposed present 
owner Harry P. Chadwick. About 
3200 square feet of land, bounded 
northerly by land now or late of Boyd, 
easterly by Wildwood avenue, south- 
erly by land now or late of Des- 
mond, westerly by land now or late of 
Flannery, being section 31, block 4A, 
lot 26 of Assessors’ Plans. $4.60 
Julia E. Fuller. About 3549 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
land now or late of McDewell, easterly 
by Russell rofCd, southerly by land 
now or late of Martin, westerly by 
.land now or late of Fitzpatrick, being 
section 33, block 4, lot 21 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $1.84 

Jennie B. Furbush. About 24,244 
square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northerly by land now or late 
of Bucknam, easterly by Kempton 
place, southerly by Washington street, 
westerly by land now or late of Tal- 
bot and Hussey, being section 30, 
block 7, lot 9 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$89.26 

Jennie B. Furbush. About 9519 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by Watertown 
street, easterly by land now or late of 
Furbush, southerly by land now or 
late of Seeton, westerly by land now 
or late of Barrett, being section 30, 
block 7, lot 18 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$83.27 

Jennie B. Furbush. About 11,279 
square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northerly by Watertown 
street, easterly by land now or late of 
Cate, southerly by Cheese Cake brook, 
westerly by land now or late of Seeton 
and Furbush, being section 30, block 
7, lot 19 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$26.72 

Jennie B. Furbush. About 7452 
square feet of land, bounded norther- 
ly by land now or late of Palmer, 
easterly by land now or late of Spen- 
cer, southerly by Adella avenue, 
westerly by Orchard avenue, being 
section 31, block 3B, lot 8A of Asses- 
sors’ Plans. $9.44 

A portion of the above lot is Regis- 
tered Land. 

John E. HefTernan. About 6010 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
erly by Warwick road, easterly by land 
now or late of MacDonald, southerly 
by land now or late of Wilbur, west- 
erly by land now. or late of Ramee, be- 
ing section 31, biock4, lot 93 of Asses- 
sors’ Plans. $5.20 

John E. Heffernan. About 5699 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by Warwick road, easterly by land 
now or late of Bearisto, southerly by 
land now or late of Wilbur, westerly 
by land now or late of MacDonald, 
being section 31, block 4, lot 95 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $4.60 

Ida M. Hodsdon. Supposed present 
owner Frank L. Blood, Trustee. About 
41,616 square feet of land, bounded 
northeasterly by land now or late of 
Rice, southeasterly by land now or 
I late of Hargedon, southwesterly by 
Derby street, northwesterly by Tol- 
man street, being section 33, block. 6, 
lot 12 'of Assessors’ Plans. $49.05 
Dana B. Jefferson. About 4250 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by land now or late of Holly, 
southeasterly by land now or late of 
Griffith, southwesterly by River street, 
northwesterly by land now or late of 
Sullivan, being section 33, block 2A, 
lot 19 of Assessors’ Plans. $10.26 
Mary E. MacDonald. About 6165 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by Warwick road, easterly by land 
now or late of Heffernan, southerly 
by land now or late of Wilbur, west- 
erly by land now or late of Heffernan, 
being section 31, block 4, lot 94 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $5.20 

Mary E. Macdonough. About 5400 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by land now or late 
of Salem Savings Bank, easterly by 
Adena road, southerly by land now or 
late of Salem Savings Bank, westerly 
by land now or late o£, Howard, being 
section 32, block 3A, lot 27 of Asses- 
sors’ Plans. $107.01 

John F. McDonald, City of Newton 
Tax Title. About 2997 square feet of 
land, bounded northerly by land now 
or late of Romkey, easterdly by land 
now or late of PomSs, southerly by 
Adams Avenue, westerly by land now 
or late of McDonald, being section 33, 
block 1H, lot 22 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$2.76 

John F. McDonald, City of Newton 
Tax Title. About 3046 square feet of 
land, bounded northerly by land now 
or late of Newell, easterly by land 
now or late of McDonald, southerly by 
Adams avenue, westerly by land now 
or late of Egan, being section 33, 
block 1H, lot 21 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$2.76 

George A. Neal. About 6852 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
land now or late of Mague, south- 
easterly by Thomas street, southwest- 
erly and southeasterly by land now or 
late of Gannon, southwesterly by 
Mague place, northwesterly and south- 
westerly by land now or late of Per- 
sico, northwesterly by Mague avenue, 
being section 33, block 1A, lot 2 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $5.52 

George A. Neal. About 1 acre, 
26,977 square feet of land and 
buildings, bounded northerly by West- 
land avenue, easterly by land now or 
late of MacNee. southerly by Thomas 
street, southwesterly by land now or 
late of Mague, northwesterly by 
Mague avenue, being section 33, block 
1A, lot 3 of Assessors’ Plans. $89.28 
Gertrude Perlmutter. About 5100 
square feet of lund and building, 
bounded northerly by the City of Wal- 
tham boundary line, northeasterly by 
land now or late of Connearney, 
southeasterly by North street, south- 
westerly by land now or late of Duffy 
and Beley, being section 31, block 5A, 
lot 2 of Assessors’ Pluns. 

balance $62.79 
Joseph S. Rogers. About 334 squure 
feet or land, bounded northerly by 
luiul now or lute of Sulom Savings 
Bank, easterly by Adena road, south- 
erly by North Gate Park, westerly by 
lund now or late of Howurd, being 
section 32, block 3A, lot 29 of Asses- 
sors' Pluns. $1.50 


square reel or ianu, oounuea nortnorly 
by Adams avenue, easterly by land 
now or late of Bishop, southerly by 
land now or lato of Schulz, westerly 
by land now or late of Allen, iboin^ 
section 33, block ID, lots 26-26 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $3.68 

William S. Sparrow! About 7500 

square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by land now or late of Lord, 
southeasterly by land now or late ot 
Hackett, southwesterly by land notf’ 
or late of De Young, northwesterly 
by James street, being section 33, 

block 2A, lot 24 of Assessors' Plans. 

$3.80 

William S. Sparrow. About 3750 

square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by land now or late of Can- 
niff, southeasterly by land now or late 
of Hackett, southwesterly by land 
now or late of Lord, northwesterly by 
James street, being section 33, block 
2A, lot 26 of Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 
William S. Sparrow. About 3685 

square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by George street, southeast- 
erly by land now or late of Foye, 
southwesterly by land now or late of 
Hackett, northwesterly by land now 
or late of Dretler, being section 33, 
block 2A, lot 33 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$1.52 

William S. Sparrow. About 10,017 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by George St., and land now 
or late of Mague. southeasterly by 
land now or late of Mague, southwest- 
erly by land now or late of Hackett, 
northwesterly by land now or late of 
McKillop, being section 33, block 2A 
lot 36 of Assessors’ Plans. $4.56 

J. W. Wilbur Company, Incorpor J 
ated. Supposed present owner Gladys 
G. Patriquin. About 3360 square feel 
of land, bounded northeasterly by 
Harding street, southeasterly by land 
now or late of Carruthers, southwest- 
erly by land now or late of Wilbur, 
northwesterly by land now or late of 
Jasset, being section 31, block 9, lot 
88 of Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

WARD 3, PRECINCT 2 

Hannah S. Barry, Heirs. About 
12,200 square feet of land and build- 
ing, bounded northeasterly and south- 
easterly by land now or .late of Nu- 
gent, southwesterly by land now or 
late of Carter, northwesterly by Curve 
street, being section 36, block 7, lot 
4 of Assessors’ Plans. Balance $10.6 
Madeline P. Burnett. About 12,702 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by land now or 
late of Inman, easterly by Perkins 
street, southerly by land now or lat~ 
of White, westerly by land now or 
late of Ritchie, being section 36, block 
5, lot 6 of Assessors’ Plans. $91.02 
Emma P. Chesley. About 23591 
square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northerly by land now or lat 
of Healey, easterly by land now or 
late of Linnell, southerly by Auburn 
street, westerly by Curve street, being 
section 36, block 7, lot 11 of Asses- 
sors’ Plans. $134.90 

Emma P. Chesley. About 2376 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by land now or late of Met 
rill, southeasterly by Washington 
street, southwesterly by land now 
or late of Peters, northwesterly 
land now or late of Merrill, being sec- 
tion 36, block 6F, lot 2 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $4.73 

Dora W. McKissock. About 18,891 
square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northerly by land now or lat 
of Peabody, easterly by land now o 
late of Avery, southerly by Sew 
all street, westerly by land no" 
or late of Whidden, northerly an' 
westerly by land now or late of Bui 
lard, being section 37, block 1, lot 9 
of Assessors’ Plans. $209.4 

Eva M. Smith. About 6003 squar 
feet of land and building, bounde 
northerly by land now or late o 
Fowle, easterly by land now or lat' 
of Downbs, southerly by Greenoug 
street, westerly by land now’ or lat 
of Carroll, being section 36, block 6E 
lot 11 of Assessors’ Plans. $47.4 
Harry P. Chadwick. About 625"’ 
square feet of land and building 
bounded northerly by land now p 
late of Merrill, easterly by land no 
or late of Zirhut and Chesley, south 
erly by land now or late of Merrill 
westerly by Gilbert street, being sec 
tion 36, block 6F, lot 21 of Assessors 
Plans. $35.4 

Helen S. Tucker. About 15821 squas 
feet of land, bounded northerly by Ian- 
now or late of Weeks, southeasterly 
by Howland road, southwesterly b 
land now or late of Tucker, being sec 
tion 38, block 2A, lot (6) -19 of As 
sessors’ Plans. $9.8 

Helen S. Tucker. About 29, 6r 
square feet of land, bounded nortlierl 
by land now or late of Weeks, north 
easterly by land now or late of Tuck 
er, southeasterly by Howland road 
southwesterly by land now or late o 
Tucker, westerly by land now or lat 
of Pulsifer, being section 38, bloc # 
2A, lot (5) -20 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$16.5 

Helen S. Tucker. About 28,514 
squaro feet of land, bounded north 
easterly by land now or late of Tuck 
er, southeasterly by Howland roa' 
southwesterly by land now or late o 
Tucker, westerly by land now or lat 
of Pulsifer, being section 38, block 2i\. 
lot (5) -21 of Assessors’ Plans. $16.5 
Helen S. Tucker. About 20,36 
square feet of land, bounded north 
easterly by land now or late of Tuck 
er, southeasterly by Howiland road 
southwesterly by land now or late o 
Tucker, westerly by land now or lut<^ 
of Pulsifer, being section 38, block 2A; 
lot (5)-22 of Assessors’ Plans. $50. 6q 
Helen S. Tucker. About 15,72C 
squaro feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by land now or late of Tuck- 
er, southeasterly by Howland road 
southwesterly by land now or late 
Campbell, westerly by land now oil 
lato or Pulsifer, being section 38 
block 2A, lot (5) -23 of Assessor^] 
Plans. $74.2 

WARD 4, PRECINCT 1. 
Maurice W. Bowen, Heirs or Dev-I 
isees. Supposed present owner Wu^ 
ter J. Cormey. About 6622 square fee 
of lund und buildings, bounded south 
westerly, northwesterly and north 
eusterly by land now or late of M. 

B. Street Railway Co., southeaster! 
by Charles street, being section 42 
block 4, lot 6 of Assessors’ PIuiul. 

$70. iK 

(Continued on Page 11) 


Til K 1SKWT0N GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1919. 


COLLECTOR'S NOTICE 
(Continued from Page 10) 
Daniel M. Chandler. About 4332 
Isquare feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by land now or 
late of Brocklesby, easterly by land 
Tiow or late of Kearney, southerly by 
Webster street, westerly by land now 
pr late of Chandler, being section 40, 
pock 3, lot 28 of Assessors’ Plans. 
, Balance $12.41 

F\ VV. Fletcher & Company, Incor- 
porated. Supposed present owner Liz- 
zie R. Fletcher. About 14,053 square 
feet of land and buildings, bounded 
portheasterly by land now or late of 
Fletcher & Buss, southeasterly by 
land now or late of Buss, southwester- 
ly nd northwesterly by land now or 
late of Fletcher, being section 42, 
plock 7, lot 16 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$53.60 

F. W. Fletcher & Company, Incor 
jorated. Supposed present owner Liz 
de R. Fletcher. About 11,370 square 
'eet of land, bounded northeasterly by 
and now or late of Moore, southeast- 
erly by land now or late of Buss, 
southwesterly by land now or late of 
uetcher, northwesterly by Charles 
Street, being section 42, block 7, lot 17 
pf Assessors’ Plans. $12.63 

F. W. Fletcher & Company, Incor- 

I sorated. Supposed present owner Liz- 
;ie R. Fletcher. About 30,755 square 
eet of land, bounded northeasterly by 
and now or late of Fletcher and Buss, 
loutheasterly by land now or late of 
A. R. R. Co., southwesterly by 
|and now or late of Estabrook, north- 
westerly by Charles street, northeast- 
erly by land now or late of Moore, 
porthwesterly by land now or late of 
doore and Morton, being section 42, 
)lock 7, lot 12 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$18.85 

Middlesex & Boston St. Ry. Co. 
Vbout 64,207 square feet of land and 
mildings, bounded northwesterly and 
lortheasterly by land now or late of 
'lorumibega Park Co., southeasterly by 
Commonwealth avenue, southwesterly 
>y land now or late of Commonwealth 
>f Massachusetts, being section 42, 
dock 1, lot 26 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$661.97 

Middlesex & Boston St. Ry. Co. 
jVtoout 18,800 square feet of land, 
jounded northerly |)y land now or late 
>f Smith, Coleman and Coughlin, east- 
erly by Bourne street, southerly toy 
and now or late of McLaughlin, west- 
erly by land now or late of M. & B. 
street Railway Co., being section 42, 
dock IB, lot 7 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$31.66. 

Middlesex & Boston St. Ry. Co. 
Kbout 2 acres, 27,823 square feet of 
and and buildings, bounded north- 
sasterly by land now or late of Smith, 
(gsterly by land now or late of y. & 
i. Street Railway Co. and McLaugh- 
in, northerly by land now or late of 
lcLaughlin, easterly by land now or 
ate of Delaney, southerly by land now 
>r late of Fitzpatrick, easterly by land 
low* or late of Fitzpatrick, Langley 
nd Bennett, southerly by Auburn 
/reet. westerly by land now or late of 
ll. & B. Street Railway Co., northwest- 
erly by Commonwealth avenue, being 
lection 42, block IB, lot 14 of Asses- 
|ors’ Plans. $745.54 

Middlesex & Boston St. Ry. Co. 
I^bout 4 acres, 2440 square feet of 
and and building, bounded easterly by 
nd now or late of M. & B. Street 
kailway Co., southerly by Auburn 
|treet, northwesterly by Common- 
fealth avenue, being section 42, block 
B, lot 15 of Assessors’ Plans. $381.23 
I Middlesex & Boston St. Ry. Co. 
|tbout 145,808 square feet of land, 
founded southwesterly by Pigeon Hill 
|oad, northwesterly by land now or 
ate of Pratt, Pigeon and Davis, north- 

[ Cly by Auburn street, southeasterly 
y Charles street, southwesterly, 
Qutheasterly and northeasterly by 
and now or late of Bowen, southeast- 
rly by Charles street, southwesterly 
y land now or late of White, south- 
asterly by land now or late of White, 
Istabrook, Paone, Fontaine and 
Jinckley, northeasterly by land now 
r late of Hinckley, southeasterly by 
Charles street, southwesterly and 
outheasterly by land now or late of 
lomer, northeasterly by land now or 
ate of Homer, southeasterly and 
ortheasterly by land now or late of 
*ratt, southeasterly by Riverside road, 
eing section 42, block 4, lot 5 of As- 
essors’ Plans. $228.97 

1 Norumbega Park Company. About 
J acres, 42,100 square feet of land and 
uildings, bounded northerly by 
’harles River, easterly by land now or 
ate of Commonwealth of Massachu- 
etts and Norumbega Park Co., south 
rly by Commonwealth avenue, south 
westerly and southeasterly by land 
iow or late of M. & B. Street Railway 
!o., westerly by Charles River, being 
ection 42, block 1, lot 27 of Assessors’' 
Mans. $2,523.39 

Norumbega Park Company. About 
5,400 square feet of land, bounded 
(irtherly by land now or late of Nor- 
imbega Park Co., easterly by land 
iow or late of Osgood, southerly by 
lommon wealth avenue, westerly by 
and now or late of Norumbega Park 
being section 42, block 1, lot 25 
|f Assessors’ Plans. $37.78 

* Norumbega Park Company. About 
lacres, 4510 square feet of land and 
uildings, bounded northeasterly by 
liver Path, easterly by Islington road 
outherly by land now or late of Whit- 
tig, City of Newton, Woodbine street 
and now or late of Osgood and Nor- 
rtibega Park Co., westerly by land 
ow or late of Norumbega Park Co., 
brtherly, westerly and easterly by 
and now or late of Commonwealth 
f Massachusetts, being section 42, 
lock 1, lot 11 of Assessors’ Plans. 

( 

Charles H. Osgood. About 19,925 
quare feet of land and buildings] 
ounded westerly and northerly by 
and now or late of Norumbega Park 
o., easterly by Woodbine street, 
outherly by land now or late of Os- 
ood, being section 42, block 1, lot 23 
f Assessors’ Plans. $123.20 

^.Charles H. Osgood. About 12,300 
quare feet of land, bounded norther- 
f by land now or late of OHgood, east- 
rly by Woodbine street, southwest- 
rly by Commonwealth avenue, west- 
rly by land now or late of Norum- 
ega Park Co., being section 42, block 
, lot 24 of Assessors’ Plans. $31.76 
Lorace M. Robbins. Iboul 8000 
|uare faal of land and building, 

outvied northerly by land now or late 

Pottei . easti rlj by land now or 

|ite of Snow, southerly by laud now 
late of Potter, westerly i>> Rook 
|ood terrace, being section 42, block 
lot 18A of Assessors’ Plans. $46.99 


Margaret. N. Ross. About 8433 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by land now or lato 
of Goodwin, easterly by Common- 
wealth avenue, southerly by land now 
or late of Butler, westerly by land 
now or late of Wood and Wentworth, 
being section 43, block 3C, lot 18 of 
Assessors’ Plans. * Bal. $61.18 
Katherine B* W. Sullivan. Sup- 
posed present owner James L. Hanni- 
fy. About 7108 square feet of land 
and building, bounded northerly by 
land now or late of Squire, north- 
easterly by Washburn avenue, south- 
erly by Newell road, westerly by land 
now or late of Sullivan, being sec- 
tion 40, block 6E, lot 15 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $113.75 

Katherine B. W. Sullivan. Sup- 
posed present owner James L. Hanni- 
fy. About 5720 square feet of land, 
bounded northerly by land now or 
late of Squire, easterly by land now 
or late of Sullivan, "Southerly by New- 
ell road, westerly by land now or 
late of Clapp, being section 40, block 


11 


George L. Willey. About 6667 

square feet of land, bounded norther 
ly by land now or late of Bond, east- 
erly by land now or late of W411ey, 
southerly by land now or late of B 
& A. R. R. Co., westerly by land now 
or late or Haigh, being section 44, 
block 14, lot 6 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$7.08 

George L. Willey. About 6666 

square feet of land, bounded norther- 
ly by land now or late of Bond, east- 
erly by land now or late of Willey 
southerly by land now or late of B 
& A. R. R. Co., westerly by land now 
or late of Willey, being section 44, 
block 14, lot 8 of Assessors’ Plans 

$2.76 

George L. Willey. About 6667 

square feet of land, bounded norther 
ly and easterly by land now or late of. 
Bond, southerly by land now or late 
of B. & A. R. R. Co., westerly by land 
now or late of Willey, being section 
44, block 14, lot 10. of Assessors’ Plans. 

$4.60 

Elizabeth Bell. About 9797 square 
feet of land and buildings, bounded 
northerly by land now or late of Hale- 
wood and Hadlock, easterly by Lex- 
ington street, southerly by land now 
or late*of Coffin, westerly by land now 
or late of Brookman, being section 41, 
block 3, lot 20 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$102.60 

Harry P. Chadwick. Supposed 
present owner Grace I. Drew, ^About 
18,995 square feet of land and build- 
ing, bounded northeasterly by land 
now or late of Goodrich and Ansley, 
southeasterly by land now or late of 
Parker, southwesterly by land now or 
late of Miller, northwesterly by Cen- 
tral street, being section 44, block 3C 
lot 4 of Assessors’ Plans. $129.80 
William G. Cruckshank. About 105 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by land now or late of James 
southeasterly by land now or late of 
McMahon, Ryan and Gaw, southwest 
erly by land now or late of Gaw, 
northwesterly by Prairie avenue, be- 
ing section 40, block 3, lot 3A of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $ .92 

John J. Delaney. Supposed present 
owner Charles H. Cooke. About 4939 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by land now or late of Delaney, east- 
erly by land now or late of Noone, 
southerly by Auburndale avenue, 
westerly by Grant street, being sec- 
tion 40, block 5G, lot 2 of Assessors' 
Plans. $11.00 

John J. Delaney. Supposed present 
owner, Charles H. Cooke. About 5570 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by land now or late of Connelly, east- 
erly by land now or late of Johnson, 
southerly by land now or late of 
Noone and Delaney, westerly by Grant 
street, being section 40, block 5G, lot 

3 of Assessors’ Plans. $8.74 

John J. Delaney. Supposed present 

owner, Charles H. Cooke. About 4931 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by Newell road, easterly by land now 
or late of The Lowell Associates of 
Waltham, southerly by land now or 
late of Connelly, westerly by Grant 
street, being section 40, block 5G, lot 
5 of Assessors’ Plans. $11.41 

John J. Delaney. Supposed present 
owner, Charles H. Cooke. About 4953 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by Newell road, easterly by Grant 
street, southerly and westerly by land 
now or late of Delaney, being section 
40, block 6, lot 3 of Assessors’ Plans. 

John J. 'Delaney. Supposed present 
owner Charles H. Cooke. About 5482 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by land now or late of Delaney, east- 
erly by Grant street, southerly by land 
now or late of Delaney, westerly by 
King street and land now or late of 
Jackson, being section 40, block 6, lot 

4 of Assessors’ Plans. $12.93 

John J. Delaney. Supposed present 

owner, Charles H. Cooke. About 4939 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by land now or late of Delaney, east- 
erly by Grant street, southerly by Au- 
burndale avenue, westerly by land 
now or late of Bourne, being section 
40, block 6, lot 6 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$9.22 

John J. Delaney. Supposed present 
owner, Charles H. Cooke. About 6193 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by Newell road, southeasterly 
by Grant street, southwesterly by 
land now or late of Delaney, north- 
westerly by land now or late of Vussa- 
lotti, being section 40, block 6, lot 3 
of Assessors’ Plans. Duplicate Bet- 
terment Apportionment and Interest 
thereon. $3.83 

John A. Donovan. About 2891 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by land now or late of Esta- 
brook, southeasterly by a passageway, 
southwesterly by land now or lato of 
Donovan, northwesterly by land now 
or late of Fitzpatrick, being section 42, 
block 7, lot 3 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$1.96 

John A. Donovan. About 2891 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by land now or late of Dono- 
van, southeasterly by a passageway, 
southwesterly by land now or lato o’ 
Donovan, northwesterly by land now 
or lato of Hartnett and Fitzpatrick, be- 
ing section 42, block 7, lot 4 of Asses- 
sors’ Plans. $1.81 

John A. Donovan. About 3000 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
westerly and northeasterly by land 
now or late of Donovan, southeaster- 
ly by a passageway, southwesterly by 
Newlaud street, being section 42. 
block 7, lot 5 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$ 8,11 

John A. Donovan. About 3000 
square foot of lund, bounded north- 
easterly and southeasterly by lund 


now or late of Donovan, southwester 
ly by Newland street, northwesterly 
by land now or late of Hartnett, 
being section 42, block 7, lot 6 of As 
sensors’ Plans. $8.11 

Arthur P. French. About 1500 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by land now or late of Em- 
erson, southeasterly by Hawthorne 
avenue, southwesterly by land now 
or late of Tracy, northwesterly by 
land now or late of Haskell, being 
section 44, block 14A, lot 22 of Asses- 
sors’ Plans. $ 3.09 

Arthur P. French. About 3000 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by land now or late of Tracy, 
southeasterly by Hawthorne avenue, 
southwesterly by land now or late of 
Eager, northwesterly by land now or 
lnte of Haskell, being section 44, block 
14A, lot 24 of Assessors’ Plans. $3.68 
Mary D. B. Hooper. Supposed 
present owner Edna S. Willcutt. 
About 8136 square feet of land and 
building, bounded northerly by land 
now or late of Johnson, easterly by 


_ , . - - - . ... ' iiuw ui unis ui juiinsuii, easterly uy 

5E, lot 16 of Assessors Plans. $14.11 land now or late of Durell, southerly 

fl nnrorn I. XJL7 ill ott A Kn,,t ntmn ... . . 


by land now or late of Pemberton, 
westerly by Commonwealth avenue, 
being section 43, block 3D, lot 12 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $148.42 

Andrew C. Kain. About 5730 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
land now or late of Hapgood, east- 
erly by Gambler street, southerly by 
land now or late of Kain, Roeder and 
Allen, westerly by land now or late of 
Allen, being section 40, block 6D, lot 
5 of Assessors’ Plans. $2.76 

Andrew C. Kain. About 4154 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
land now or late of Kain, easterly by 
Gambier street, southerly by Auburn- 
dale avenue, westerly by land now 
or late of Roeder, being section 40, 
block 5, lot 4 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$4.88 

James F. and Walter B. Rector. 
About 1 acre, 1040 square’ feet of land, 
bounded northeasterly by land now 
or late of Costello, southeasterly by 
Lexington street, southwesterly, 
southeasterly and northeasterly by 
land now or late of Rector, southeast- 
erly by Lexington street, southwest- 
erly by land now or late of Smith, 
northwesterly by flowed meadow, be- 
ing section 41, block 1, lot 7 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $29.53 

Robert F. Sanderson. About 1 
acre, 3404 square feet of land, bound- 
ed northerly by land now or late of 
Corey and Dennett, easterly by land 
now or late of Heckman and Foss, 
southerly by Woodland road, westerly 
by land now or late of Chaplin, 
Chandler and Fuller, being section 43, 
block 3A, lot 7 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$75.60 

Henry A. C. Schulz. About 5585 
square feet of land, bounded norther- 
ly by land now or late of Gowell, east- 
erly by land now or late of Donovan, 
southerly by Sharon avenue, westerly 
by Weir street, being section 43, block 
2A, lot 8 of Assessors’ Plans. $10.08 
Henry A. C. Schulz. About 6641 
square feet of land, bounded norther- 
ly by land now or late of Gowell. east- 
erly by land now or late of Nielson, 
southerly and easterly by land now or 
late of Donovan, southerly by land 
now or late of Gowell., westerly by 
Weir street, being section 43, block 
2A. lot 9 of Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 
Henry A. C. Schulz. About 6716 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by land now or late of Lucas, easterly 
by land now or late of Nielson, south- 
erly by land now or late of Gowell. 
westerly by Weir street, being section 
43, block 2A, lot 10 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $1.84 

Elizabeth Schwartz. About 33,610 
square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northerly by land now or late 
of B. & A. R. R. Co., easterly by land 
now or late of Hall and Melody, 
southerly by Auburn street, westerly 
by land now or late of Burbank, being 
section 43, block 4, lot 12 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $434.20 

WARD 4, PRECINCT 2 
Isabella Jamieson. Supposed pres- 
ent owner. Nils S. Eng. About 10,987 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by Beacon street, easterly by Agawam 
road, southerly and westerly by land 
now or late of Jamieson, being section 
47, block 4, lot 309 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$26.07 

Isabella Jamieson. Supposed pres- 
ent owner Nils S. Eng. About 9190 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by land now or late of Jamieson, east- 
erly by Agawam road, southerly by 
land now or late of Shales, westerly 
by land now or late of Leonard, being 
section 47, block 4, lot 308 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $14.26 

Annie M. Kelley, City of Newton Tax 
Title. Supposed present owner, Walter 
H. Kelley, City of Newton Tax Title. 
About 5150 square feet of land, bound- 
ed northeasterly by land now or late 
of O’Rourke, southeasterly by land 
now or late of Leland. southwesterly 
by Neshobe road, northwesterly by 
land now or late of O’Rourke, being 
section 47, block 3, lot 299A of Asses- 
sors’ Plans. $4.88 

William Kenney. Tr. About 11,750 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by Waban avenue, easterly by land 
now or late of JJarron, southeasterly 
by land now or fate of Winslow, south- 
westerly by East Quinobequin road, 
westerly by land now or late of Win- 
slow, being section 47, block 6, lot 637 
of Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

John H. O’Rourke. Supposed pres- 
ent. owner, Walter H. Kelley. About 
10.787 square feet of land, bounded 
northeasterly by land now or late of 
O’Rourke, southeasterly by land now 
or late of Kelley, southwesterly by 
Neshobe road, northwesterly by Wash- 
ington street, being section 47, block 3, 
lot 299 of Assessors’ Plans. $15.19 
ouise K. Wood. Supposed present 
owner Nellie G. Kimball. About 
15,700 square feet of land, bounded 
northerly by Beacon street, easterly 
by Varick road, southerly by land now 
or late of Murphy, westerly by land 
now or late of Parsons, being section 
47, block 5, lot 321 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$42.74 

The ubove lot is Registered Land. 

WARD 5. PRECINCT 1 

Donato Di Giorgio und Nelli Di Gior- 
gio. About 3686 square feet of land 
and building .bounded northerly by 
land now or late of Holmes, easterly by 
land now or late of Sullivan, southerly 
by Winter street, westerly by Spring 
street, being section 51. block 5. lot 
5 of Assessors’ Plans. Bulunce $ .29 
Edward M. Feeley. About 5400 
square feet of land ami building, 
bounded northeasterly by laud now or 


late of B. & A. R. R. Co., southeasterly 
by land now or late of Cozens, south- 
westerly by Canterbury road, north- 
westerly by land now or late of Cas- 
well, being section 50, block 2, lot 10 
of Assessors’ Plans. Balance $37.66 
James P. Hagerty, Heirs. About 

16,500 square feet, of land and build- 
ings, bounded northerly by land now 
or late of Bakeman nnd Everett, east- 
erly, southerly and easterly by land 
now or late of Everett, southerly by 
land now or late of Ryle, westerly by 
Chestnut street, being section 51, block 
6, lot 19 of Assessors’ Plans. $97.76 
Jane E. Mahoney, Heirs. About 

36,527 square feet of land and build- 
ings, bounded northeasterly by land 
now or late of Horsfall and McLaugh- 
lin, northwesterly and northeasterly by 
land now or late of Mahoney, south- 
easterly by Chandler place, southerly 
by land now or ihte of Holmes, west- 
erly and southwesterly by Wetherell 
street, northwesterly by Elliot street, 
being section 52. block 16, lot 17 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $112.50 

Jane E. Mahoney, Heirs. About 9700 
square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northerly by land now or late 
of Lester, easterly by land now or late 
of Billings, southerly by land now or 
late of B. & A. R. R. Co., westerly by 
Mechanic street, being section 52, block 
16, lot 2 of Assessors’ Plans. $49.68 
Jeremiah J. Mahoney. Supposed 
present owner Jeremiah J. Mahoney. 
Heirs. About 10,400 square feet of 
land and buildings, bounded north- 
easterly and southerly by land now or 
late of Masten and Wells, westerly by 
land now or late of N. Y.. N. H., and 
H. R. R. Co., being section 52, block 
11, lot 12 of Assessors’ Plans. $39.56 
Jeremiah J. Mahoney. Supposed 
present ow’ner, Jeremiah J. Mahoney. 
Heirs. About 36,948 square feet of 
land, bounded northerly by Osslpee 
road,*easterly by land now or late of 
Ferson. southerly by land now or late 
of N. Y.. N. H.. and H. R. R. Co., west- 
erly by Linden street, northerly and 
westerly by land now or late of Earle, 
being section 52, block 15A, lot 2 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $22.51 

Jeremiah J. Mahoney. Supposed 
present owner. Jeremiah J. Mahoney. 
Heirs. About 5000 square feet of land, 
bounded northerly by Elliot terrace, 
easterly by Chandler place, southerly 
by land now or late of Mahoney, west- 
erly by land now or late of McLaugh- 
lin, being section 52, block 16, lot 22 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $5.52 

Jeremiah J. Mahoney. Supposed 
present owner. Jgremiah J. Mahoney. 
Heirs. About 6670 square feet of land 
and building, bounded northerly by 
land now or late of Mahoney, easterly 
toy Chandler place, southerly, easterly 
and southerly by land now or late of 
Mahoney, westerly by land now or late 
of McLaughlin, being section 52, block 
16. lot 23 of Assessors’ Plans. $22.08 
Jeremiah J. Mahoney. Supposed 

present owner, Jeremiah J. Mahoney. 
Heirs. About 3240 square feet of land 
and building, bounded northeasterly 
by land now or late of Holmes, south- 
easterly by Wetherell street, south- 
westerly by land now or late of Ma- 
honey. westerly by land now or late 
of Gahar, being section 52, block 18. 

lot 9 of Assessors’ Plans. $30.36 

Jeremiah J. Mahoney. Supposed 

nresent owner. Jeremiah J. Mahoney. 
Heirs. About 24S6 square feet of land, 
bounded northeasterly by land now* or 
late of Mahoney, southeasterly and 
southerly by Wetherell street, westerly 
by land now or late of Barrows and 
Gahan, being section 52, block 18. lot 
10 of Assessors’ Plans. $1.S4 

Dora B. Marcv. About 43,500 square 
feet of land nnd buildings, bounded 
northerly by Chestnut street, easterly 
by land now or late of Strombom. 
southerly by land now or late of N, Y.. 
N. H. and H. R. R. Co., westerly and 
northwesterly by land now’ or late of 
Marcy, being section 52, block 7. lot 5 
of Assessors’ Plans. $39.32 

George L. Marcy. About 6 acres. 
2660 square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northeasterly by Chestnut 
street, easterly and northeasterly bv 
land now or late of Marcev. southeast- 
erly by land now or late of N. Y.. N. H. 

& H. R. R. Co., southwesterly by 
Charles River, northw’esterly by land 
now or late of Marcey, being section 
52, block 7, lot 4 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$211.82 

George L. Marcy. About 6 acres. 
19,600 square feet of land, bounded 
northeasterly by Chestnut street, 
southeasterly by land now or late of 
Marcy, southwesterly by Charles 
River, northwesterly by land now or 
late of City of Newton, bejrg section 
52, block 7, lot 3 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$106.76 

Winnie M. McAleer. About 7465 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by land now or late of Jones, easterly 
by land now or late of Mason, south- 
erly by Champa street, westerly by 
land now or late 8f Duvall, being sec- 
tion 51, block 10, lot 20 of Assessors' 
Plans. $9.32 

Daniel S. Shea. About 5000 square 
feet of land and building, bounded 
northerly by Wetherell street, east- 
erly by land now or late of Pettee. 
southerly by land now or late of 
Buckley, westerly by Elliott street, 
being section 52, block 18, lot 20 of 
Assessors’ Plans. Balance $35.09 

Alice L. Sullivan. Supposed pres- 
ent owner Harry P. Chadwick. About 
7750 square feet of land, bounded 
northeasterly by High street, easterly 
by land now or late of Temperley. 
southerly by Elliot street, westerly by 
Sullivan avenue and land now or late 
of Crowley, being section 51, block 6. 
lot 12 of Assessors’ Plans. $9.14 

Harry P. Chadwick. About 5675 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by land now or late of 
Jones, easterly by land now or late 
of Billings, southerly by Champa 
street, westerly by land now or late 
of Slamin, being section 51, block 
10. lot 15 of Assessors’ Plans. $7.60 
Harry P. Chadwick. About 5615 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by Champa street, south- 
easterly by land now or late of Mar- 
tin, southwesterly by land now or 
late of Duloy, northwesterly by lund 
now or late of Hunting, being sec- 
tion 51, block 10A, lot 12 of Assessors' 
Plans. $7.48 

Ellen F. Keefe. Heirs. Supposed 
present owner Harry P. Chadwick. 
About 6530 square feet of land and 
building, bounded northeasterly by 


WARD 5, PRECINCT 2 
Henry A. Brown. About 3500 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by Jaconnet street, easterly by land 
now or late of Paul and Sullivan, 
southerly by land now or late of 
Masten and Wells, westerly by land 
now or late of Milward, being section 
53, block 13, lot 26 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$1.84 

Catherine E. Cannon. About 5444 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly and easterly by 
land now or late of Phillips, south- 
erly by Cannon street, westerly by 
Dedham street, being section 55, block 
1, lot 25 of Assessors’ Plans. $23.92 
Corp E. Collins. About 8400 square 
feet of land and building, bounded 
northeasterly by land now or late of 
Collins, southeasterly by land now or 
late of Sharpe, southwesterly by land 
now or late of Farnsworth, northwest- 
erly by Carver road, being section 56, 
block 36, lot 7 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$110.88 

Cora E. Collins. About 8400 square 
feet of land, bounded northeasterly by 
land now or late of Stone, southeast- 
erly by land now or late of Mason, 
southwesterly by land now or late of 
Collins, northwesterly by Carver road, 
being section 56, block 36, lot 8 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $23.16 

Edgar M. Day. About 5800 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by land 
now’ or late of Ludlam, easterly by 
land now or late of Loud, southerly 
by Carver road, westerly by land now 
or late of Loud, being section 56, block 
32B, lot (8 J -14 of Assessors’ Plans. 

Bal. $16.18 

Eva G. Douglas. Supposed present 
owner Emma C. Perkins. About 12,- 
255 square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northerly by land now or late 
of McMullin, easterly by Woodward 
street, southerly by Carver ro«.d 
westerly by land now or late of Nye, 
being section 56, block 32C, lot (9)-34- 
35 of Assessors’ Plans. ' $216.35 

Delia A. Faherty. About 23,050 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by land now or 
late of Sullivan aqd Coburn, easterly 
by Winchester street, southerly by 
land now or late of Melia and O’Dris- 
coll. westerly by land now or late of 
Sullivan, being section 53, block 5. lot 
10 of Assessors’ Plans. $57.62 

Josephine Fountain. About 2 
acres, 8350 square feet of land, 
bounded northerly by land now or late 
of Knight and White, easterly by land 
now or late of McHugh, northerly by 
a passagew’ay, easterly by land now’ or 
late of Fountain, southerly by land 
now or late of Green, westerly by land 
now’ or late of Knight, being section 

55, block 1, lot 12 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$24.64 

Josephine Fountain. About 18,240 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by a passageway, 
easterly by Parker street, southerly by 
land now or late of Green, westerly by 
land now’ or late of Fountain, being 
section 55, block 1, lot 13 of Assessors' 
Plans. $33.12 

Mabel K. Holmes. About 6674 
square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northeasterly by Rockledge 
road, southeasterly by land now- 
late of Gately, southwesterly by land 
now’ or late of Rogers, northwesterly 
by land now or late of Raye. being 
section 55, block 9. lot 5 of Assessors' 
Plans. $167.45 

William S. Jackson. About 25.46S 
square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northeasterly by land now or 
late of Thompson, southeasterly by 
Hartford street, southerly by Bovlston 
street, w’esterly, southerly and wester- 
ly by land now’ or late of Brackett, 
northw-esterly by land now or late of 
Sw’an and Mattson, being section 56. 
block 22, lot 21 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$176.25 

Caroline Emery Leonard. About 
6969 square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by land now’ or late 
of Sw’eeney, easterly by land now’ or 
late of Early, southerly by Forest 
street, westerly by Columbus street, 
being section 56, block 12, lot 12 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $107.35 

Florence E. McGourty. About 1 
acre, 29.120 square feet of land and 
buildings, bounded northerly, north- 
easterly and northerly by land now or 
late of McGourty. northerly by land 
now’ or late of Mills, northeasterly by 
land now’ or late of Hurley, south- 
easterly by land now’ or late of Burke, 
southerly by land now’ or late of 
Burke and Linn, westerly by Parker 
street, being section 54, block 6. lot 
36 of Assessors’ Plans. $66.96 

Florence E. McGourty. About 2 
acres. 25.5S4 square feet of land, 
bounded northeasterly by land now* or 
late of Mills, southerly, southwesterly 
and southerly by land now or late of 
McGourty, westerly by Parker street, 
being section 54, block 6, lot 37 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $20.96 

Carl F. Monk. Supposed present 
ow’ner, Seth Lee. About 8400 square 
feet of land and building, bounded 
northerly by Carver road, easterly by 
Dickerman road, southerly by land 
now’ or late of Steur. westerly by land 
now or late of Tange, being section 

56. block 32, lot (8)-20 of Assessors' 

Plans. $126.97 

"Stephen J. O’Brien. About 3750 
square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northerly by land now or late 
of Russell, easterly by High street, 
southerly by land now or late of Mc- 
Isaacs, westerly by land now or late 
of Strugstad, being section 53. block 
8, lot 2 of Assessors’ Plans. $40. 4S 

Sadie M. Ray. About 15.270 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
land now or late of Ritchie, easterly 
by Walnut street, southerly by land 
now or late of Waterhouse, westerly 
by land now or late of Lane and Beck, 
being section 56. block 11, lot 5 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $37.96 

Joseph S. Russo. About 2 acres. 
22,880 square feet of land and build- 
ings, bounded northeasterly by land 
now or late of Adelman. easterly by 
land now or late of Knight, southerly 
by land now or late of Cannon, west- 
trlj by Dedham itreet, being section 
55. block 1. lot 2S of Assessors' Plans. 

$58.88 

Patrick Sullivan, Devisees. Sup- 
posed present owner Dennis \\. Sulli- 
vun. About 10.926 square feet of land 
and building, bounded northeasterly 
by Rockland street, southeasterly by 
land now or lute of Sullivan, south- 


Timothy C. Sullivan, Devisees. 
About 43,560 square feet of land, 
bounded northeasterly by Beacon 
street, southeasterly by, land now or 
late of Newton Home for Aged People, 
southwesterly by land now or late of 
Frost, northwesterly by land now or 
late of Speare, being section 56, block 
48, lot 12 of Assessors’ Plans. $6.98 
Mary A. Thompson. Supposed pres- 
ent owner Thomas F. Grace. About 
4550 square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northerly by land now or late 
of Clark, easterly by Winchester 
street, southerly and northwesterly by 
land now or late of Quimby, being 
section 53, block 5, lot 6 of Assessors 
Plans. $49.68 

George L. Willey. About 2500 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by land now or late of Mc- 
Isaacs, southeasterly by High street 
southwesterly by land now or late of 
Winchester, northwesterly by land now 
or late of Webster, being section 53 
block 8, lot 4 of Assessors’ Plans 

$1.84 

Harry P. Chadwick. About 5 acres, 
33.800 square feet of land, bounded 
northeasterly by land now or late 
of Kingman, southerly by land now or 
late of King, westerly by land now or 
late of Dwight, northwesterly by land 
now or late of Bacon, being section 
56. block 48, lot 27 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$11.04 

John M. Cooke. About 6436 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly and 
no theasterly by land now or late of 
Graham, southeasterly by Terrace 
avenue, southwesterly by land now or 
late of Faherty. being section 56, 
block 49. lot 20A of Assessors’ Plans. 

$3.68 

Greta M. Crowe. About 3655 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
Walnut place, easterly by land now or 
late of Crowe, southeasterly by land 
now or late of Burke, southwesterly 
by Walnut street, being section 55, 
block 1A, lot 8 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$4.60 

Greta M. Crowe. About 3285 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
Walnut place, easterly by land now or 
late of Galvin, southerly by land now 
or late of Burke, westerly by land now 
or late of Crow’e. being section 55. 
block 1A. lot 9 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$4.60 

Adolph I. Dinner, Trustee. About 
6256 square feet of land, bounded 
northerly by land now or late of Din- 
ner and Clark, easterly by land now 
or late of Allen, southerly by Walnut 
place, southwesterly by Walnut street, 
being section 55. block IB, lot 6 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $9.20 

Adolph I. Dinner. Trustee. About 
1818 square feet of land, bounded 
northerly by Bovlston street, easterly 
and southerly by land now- or late of 
Dinner, southwesterly by Walnut 
§treet, being section 55. block IB. lot 
7 of Assessors’ Plans. $3.85 

Adolph I. Dinner. Trustee. About 
2000 square feet of land, bounded 
northerly by Bovlston street, easterly 
by land now or late of Clark, souther- 
ly and westerly by land now or late of 
Dinner, being section 55, block IB, lot 
S of Assessors' Plans. $3.SS 

Climina H. Drake. About 9 acres, 
13.S00 square feet of land and build- 
ings. bounded northerly, northwester- 
ly and northeasterly by land now or 
late of Kennard. southeasterly by land 
now or late of Janse. w’esterly by 
Dudley road, being section 54. block 
4, lot 6 of Assessors’ Plans. $103.04 
Alfred. E. Long. Supposed present 
ow’ner Ernestine Robitcheek. Mortga- 
gee in Possession. About 5S61 square 
reet of land and building, bounded 
southwesterly. northwesterly and 
northeasterly by land now* or late of 
Butler, southeasterly by Elliot street 
being section 53. block 2, lot (4)-12 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $78.20 

Alfred. E. Long. Supposed present 
owner Ernestine Robitcheek. Mortga- 
gee in Possession. About 4388 square 
feet of land and building, bounded 
southwesterly, northwesterly and 
northeasterly by land now or late of 
Butler, southeasterly by Elliot street, 
being section 53. block 2, lot (41-10 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $77.28 

Alfred. E. Long. Supposed present 
owner Ernestine Robitcheek. Mortga- 
gee in Possession. About 9163 square 
feet of land and building, bounded 
northerly, northeasterly, southeasterly 
and southerly by land now* or late of 
Butler, westerly by Circuit avenue, be- 
ing section 53, block 2. lot (41-7 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $80.96 

Alfred. E. Long. Supposed present 
ow’ner Ernestine Robitcheek. Mortga- 
gee in Possession. About S592 square 
feet of land 'and building, bounded 
northerly, northeasterly and southerly 
by land now or late of Butler, wester- 
ly by Circuit avenue, fcfeing section 53. 
block 2. lot (4)-S of Assessors’ Plans. 

$S0.96 

George A. Neal. About 8453 square 
feet of land, bounded northeasterly by 
Alden street, southeasterly by land now 
or late of Mague, southwesterly by Co- 
chit uate aqueduct, northwesterly by 
Winslow toad, being section 56. block 
40. lot IS of Assessors' Plans. $2.76 
George a. Neal. About 6818 square- 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
Alden street, easterly by land now or 
late of Mague. southerly by Cocliituate 
aqueduct, westerly by land now or late 
of Mague. being section 56, block 40. 
lot 19 of Assessors’ Plans. $l.S4 

George A. Neal. About 7496 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
Alden street, easterly by land now* or 
late of Mague. southerly by Cochituat 


by Beethoven avenue, being section 56, 
block 42, lot 22 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$1.84 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet, of land, bounded northerly by land 
now or late of Frost, easterly and 
southerly by land now or late of Bai- 
ley, westerly by Beethoven avenue, 
being section 56. block 42. lot. 32 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 7672 square 
feet of land, hounded northerly by 
Beacon street, easterly and southerly 
by land now or late of Frost, westerly 
by land now or late of Bailey, being 
section 56. block 42, lot 36 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $5.18 

George A. Neal. About 7914 square 
feet of land, hounded northerlv by 
land now or late of Bailey, easterly by 
Winslow road, southerly and westerly 
by land now or late of Mague. being 
section 56. block 42, lot 54 of Assessors' 
Plans. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded westerly and 
northerly by land now or late of 
Mague. easterly by Winslow road, 
southerly by land now or late of 
Mague. being section 56, block 42. lot 
55 of Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land bounded northerly by 
land now or late of Mague. easterly by 
Winslow road, southerly by land now 
or late of Frost, westerly by land now 
or late of Riley, being section 56, block 
42. lot 56 of Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 
George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of Hand, bounded northerly by 
land now or late of Frost, easterly by 
Winslow- road, southerly by land now 
or late of Bailey, westerly by land now 
or late of Connors, being section 36, 
block 42, lot 64 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$3.68 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
land now or late of Mague, easterly 
and southerly by land now or late of 
Bailey, westerly by Winslow road, 
being section 56, block 44. lot 24 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly and 
easterly by land now or late of Bai- 
ley. southerly by land now or late of 
Mague. westerly by Winslow road, 
being section 56, block 44, lot 25 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 8211 square 
feet of land, bounded westerly and 
northerly by land now* or late of 
Mague. easterly by land now or late 
of Atlas Film Corporation, southerly 
by George street, being section 56. 
block 45A. lot 1 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$1.S4 

George A. Neal. ‘About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded westerly, north- 
erly and easterly by land now or late 
of Mague. southerly by George street, 
being section 56, block 45A. lot 2 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded westerly, north- 
erly and easterly by land now* Or late 
of Mague. southerly by George street, 
being section 56. block 45 A. lot 3 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded westerly, north- 
erly and easterly by land now or late 
of Mague. southerly by George street, 
being section 56. block 45 A. lot 4 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly and 
easterly by land now* or late of Mague. 
southerly by George street, westerly 
by Vaughn avenue, being section 56. 
block 45A. lot 5 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$1.S4 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly, east- 
erly and southerly by land now* or late 
of Mague. westerly by Vaughn avenue, 
being section 56. block 45 A. lot 6 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly, east- 
erly and southerly by land now* or late 
of Mague. w’esterly by Vaughn avenue, 
being section 56. block 45 A. lot 7 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $1.S4 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly, east- 
erly and southerly by land now or late 
of Mague. westerly by Vaughn avenue, 
being section 56. block 45A. lot S of 

Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly, east- 
erly and southerly by land now or late 
of Mague. westerly by Vaughn avenue, 
being section 56. block 45A. lot 9 of 

Assessors’ Plans. S1.S4 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by Wil- 
ber street, easterly and southerly by 
land now or late of Mague. westerly 
by Vaughn avenue, being section 56, 
block 45A. lot 10 of Assessors’ Plans. 

. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by Wil- 
ber street, easterly, southerly and west- 
erly by land now or late of Mague. 
being section 56. block 45A. lot 11 of 
Assessors’ Plans $1.S4 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by Wil- 
ber street, easterly, southerly and west- 
erly by land now or late of Mague. 
being section 56. block 45A, lot 12 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

George A Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by Wil- 
ber street, easterly, southerly and west- 
erly by land now or late of Mague. 
being section 56. block 45A. lot 13 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 7725 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by Wil- 
I her street, easterly and northerly by 


feet of land, bounded 


Alden street, easterly by land now or j ‘ 
late of Mague. southerly by Cochituatel 
aqueduct, westerly by land now or late 


tion 56. block 45 A. 


George A. Neal. 


lot 14 of Assessors’ 
$1.84 

About 5671 square 


aqueuuci. wesurij u> lauu uu * ui of | an d. bounded northerly by Wil* 

o Mague. being section on. block 40 lot her stree , gaaterlv by lan, I now or laie 
-1 of Assessors I Ians. * ' i of Mague. southeasterly by land now 

o'. T /, or late ot Atlas Him <Vn,omtio... 


feet of land, bounded northerly by A1 
den street, easterly by land now or late 
of Mague. southerly by Coohltuate 
aqueduct, westerly by land now or late 
of Mague, being seetiou 56, block 40. 


land now or late of CUesley, south- | westerly by land now or late of O’ 


westerly and westerly by Ellis street 
being section 51, block 2, lot 2 of As- 
sessors’ Plan. $18.40 


Brien, northwesterly by High street, 
being section 53, bloek 12, lot 22 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $46.92 


lot 22 of Assessors’ Plans. 


southerly and westerly by lund now or 
late of Slague. heing section 56. bloek 
45A, lot 15 of Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 
George A. Neal About 5169 square 


George A. Neal. About S150 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by Al- 
den street, easterly by land now or 
late of Bailey, southerly by Cochit uate 
aqueduct, westerly by lund uow or lute 
of Mague, being section 56, block 40. 
lot 23 of Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 9214 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
laud now or late of Bailey, easterly by 
luud uow or late of Mague, southerly 
by laud uow or late of Riley, westerly 


jl S4 (eet of land, bounded northerly by Wil- 


ber street, southeasterly by land now 
or late of Atlas Film Corporation, 
westerly by land uow or late of Mague. 
being section 56, block 45A, lot 16 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 7916 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
luud now or lute of Mague, southeast- 
erly by land now or late of Tucker, 
westerly by Vaughn avenue, being sec- 
tion 56. block 46, lot 17 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $184 

(Continued on Puge 14) 


12 


TIIK NEWTON GRAPHIC, FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1910. 


COLLECTOR'S NOTICE 

(Continued from Page 15) 
Souren O. Yardume. About 2500 
squnre feet of land, bounded northerly 
by land now or late of Kellogg, east- 
erly by land now or late of Sarkisinn. 
southerly by Boylston street, westerly 
by land now or late of Tevrizian, being 
section 55. block 7, lot 20 A of Asses- 
sors* Plans. $5.35 

WARD 5. PRECINCT 3 

Orpha May Barnard. About 0778 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northerly by Woodward 
street, easterly by Chestnut street, 
southerly by land now or late of Ste- 
phen. westerly by land now or late of 
Parent, being section 57, block 2. lot 
27 of Assessors’ Plans. $156.02 

Jessie G. Gould. About 50,677 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
Beacon street, easterly by land now 
or late of Waters and Cornish, south- 
erly by Neholden road, westerly nml 
southerly by land now or late of Maz- 
zur. westerly by land now or late of 
Jones, being section 5S. block 11, lot 
2 of Assessors’ Plans. $75.68 

Jessie G. Gould. About 109,324 
square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northerly by Beacon street, 
easterly by land now or late of Bes- 
sey. southerly and southwesterly by 
Neholden road, westerly by land now 
or late of Gould, northerly and west- 
erly by land now or late of Hunt, be- 
ing section 58, block 12, lot 6 of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $335.99. 

Jessie G. Gould. About 1 acre. 87S0 
square feet of land, bounded northerly 
by land now or late of Buttrick. Horn, 
Lamb and Hunt, easterly by land now 
or late of Gould, southerly by Xehoid- 
en road, westerly by land now or late 
of Chadbourne, being section 58. block 
12. lot 5 of Assessors’ Plans. $133.37 
Jessie G. Gould. About 4 acres, 
120.360 square feet of land, bounded 
northerly by land now' or late of O’- 
Brien. Morris, Rivinius and Gilmore, 
westerly and northwesterly by land 
now or late of Gilmore, northeasterly 
by land now or late of Webster and 
Burnett, southeasterly and northeast- 
erly by land now or late of Burnett, 
southerly by Waban avenue, south- 
westerly by land now’ or late of Dutch, 
northwesterly by land now’ or late of 
Dutch. Griffin. Know’les and O’Brien, 
being section 58. block 14, lots 1 and 
2 of Assessors’ Plans. $83.28 

Jessie G. Gould. About 2 acres. 
37.104 square feet of land, bounded 
northerly and westerly by land now’ or 
late of Willis, northerly by land now’ 
or late of Willis and Shaw, easterly 
by land now or late of City of New’ton, 
Loud, end of Rokeby road, land now 
or late of Brow’n. City of Newton, and 
Bond, southeasterly by Quinobequin 
road, westerly by land now’ or late of 
Congdon and end of Rokeby road, be- 
ing section 58. block 20, lots 9 and 20 
of Assessors’ Plans. $25.76 

Jessie G. Gould. About 9 acres, 8800 
square feet of land, bounded north- 
easterly by land now or late of Rein- 
hardt. southeasterly by land now or 
late of Gould, southerly by Quinobe- 
quin road, westerly by land now or 
late of Cram, northwesterly by land 
now or late of MacDonald and Moore, 
southwesterly by l.and now or late of 
Moore, westerly by Crofton road, 
northeasterly by land now or late of 
Schirmer. Wright and Knights, north- 
westerly by land now’ or late of 
Knights, westerly by land now’ or late 
of Knights. Kimball and McKinney, 
northwesterly and westerly by land 
now’ or late of Fisher, northerly and 
westerly by land now or late of Ray- 
ner. northwesterly by Waban avenue, 
being section 58. block 20B, lot 29 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $98.80 

Jessie G. Gould. About S acres. 
38.732 square feet of land, bounded 
northeasterly by land now or late of 
Reinhardt, easterly by land now or 
late of Moses, end of Annaw’an road, 
and land now* or late of Sawrtelle, 
northerly by land now’ or late of Saw- 
telle, southeasterly by end of Wylore 
road, and land now or late of Sanborn, 
end of Edgefield road, land now’ or 
late of McArthur. Field, Gibbs, Rich. 
City of Newton and Field, southerly by 
Waban avenue, westerly by land now’ 
or late of Gould, being section 58, 
block 20B, lot 42 of Assessors’ Plans. 

$77.44 

Laura M. Holmes. Supposed pres- 
ent owner, Frances L and Harry M. 
Came. About 9200 square feet of land 
and building, bounded northwesterly 
by land now or late of Johnson, east- 
erly by land now or late of Gerrity. 
southerly by Carlton and Kelveden 
roads, being section 58, block 7. lot 
410 of Assessors’ Plans. $167.18 

Bertha H. Jeffersort. About 35.079 
square feet of land and buildings, 
bounded northerly by Beacon street, 
easterly by land now or late of Cook 
and Chadbourne, southerly by land 
now or late of Webster and Cornish, 
westerly bv land now or late of Gould, 
being section 58, block 11, lot 3 of As- 
sessors’ Plans $216.54 

Edith V. Lauib. About 22,500 square 
feet of land and building, bounded 
northerly by Beacon street, easterly 
by land now or late of Jiunt, souther- 
ly by land now or late of Gould, west- 
erly by land now’ or late of Horn, be- 
ing section 58. block 12, lot 5A of As- 
sessors’ Plans. $138.64 

Emily E. Mague. About 13,582 
square feet of land and building, 
bounded northeasterly, southeasterly 
and southwesterly by land now’ or late 
of Mague, northwesterly by Washing- 
ton street, being section 57, block 13J, 
lot 11 of Assessors’ Plans. $133.18 
Lydia A. Crafts. About 6496 square 
feet of land, bounded northeasterly by 
Pontiac road, southeasterly by Stet- 
son Way, southwesterly by land now 
or late of City of Newton, northwest- 
erly by land now or late of Crafts, be- 
ing section 58, block 17 A, lot 09 of 
Assessors' Plans. $2.76 

Lydia A. Crafts. About 3138 square 
feet of land, bounded northeasterly 

by Pontiac road, southeasterly by land 
now or late of Crafts, southwesterly 
by land now or lute of City of Newton, 
noi thvn ei tei ly by land no w oi late ol 
Koenig, being section 58, block 17 A. 
lot 7U of Assessors’ Plans. $ 92 

Julia E. Fuller. About 8220 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 

land now or late of Young, easterly 
by land now or latu of Wells, south- 
erly by Quinobequin road, westerly 

by land now or late of Fuller, being 
section 58, block 20, lot 24 of Asses- 
sors’ Plans. $1.84 

Julia E. Fuller. About 5400 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 

land now or late of Young*, easterly 
by land now or lute of Fuller, south- 


erly by Quinobequin road, westerly 
by land now orjate of Fuller, being 
section 58. bloctf 20, lot 25 of Asses- 
sors’ Plans. $2.76 

Julia E. Fuller. About 5340 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
land now or late of Young, easterly 
by land now or late of Fuller, south- 
erly by Quinobequin road, westerly 
by land now or late of Fuller, being 
section 58, block 20, lot 26 of Asses- 
sors* Plans. $2.76 

Julia E. Fuller. About 5140 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by- 
land now or late of Young, easterly 
by land now or late of Fuller, south- 
erly by Quinobequin road, westerly by 
land now or late of Eberth, being sec- 
tion 6S. block 20, lot 27 of Assessors’ 
Plans. |2.76 

Peter Hughes. About 4356 square 
feet of land, bounded northeasterly 
by land now or late of Congdon. south- 
easterly by land now or late of Gibb, 
southwesterly by Dwinda road, north- 
westerly by Cobb place, being section 
58. block 17A, lot 61 of Assessors’ 
Plans. $2.76 

George A. Neal. About 7500 square 
feet of *land. bounded northerly, east- 
erly and southerly by land now or late 
of Frost, westerly by Allen avenue, 
being section 57, block 11. lot 10 of 
Assessors’ Plans. $1.84 

George A. Neal. About 8S91 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
Beacon street, easterly by land now 
or late of Mague. southerly by land 
now or late of Brown, westerly by 
land now or late of Thompson, being 
section 57, block 11, lot 16 of Asses- 
sors’ Plans. $4.26 

George A. Neal. About 8947 square 
feet of land, bounded northerly by 
Beacon street, easterly and southerly 
by land now or lat